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Full text of "Athlete, The"






;!^^i in: il-i:' ^' 






Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/athletethe196263unse 




High Schoot Athlete 



duPONT MANUAL HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION — 1962 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Ass't Coach Ellington, Mgr. Gardner, Owens, 
Bray, Coomer, Logan, Pfeffer, Mgr. Waggoner, Coach Skeeters. Second Row: 
Perry, Sego, Haynes, Hewlett, Nally, Beauchamp, Mumford, Robinson, Miner. 
Third Row: Zollinger, Stokes, Denzik, Woosley, Farmer, Grant, Bohanon, Smith, 
Clark, Shuck. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

AUGUST- 13B2 




Kentucky High School Track Meet 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 18-19, 1962 

duPont Manual High School Track Team--K. H. S. A. A. Champion 1962 




Row: Coach Whelan. Schildknecht, Mullins. Carter. Snow. Br 
I Row: Reed, Waters, Wood, Reynolds, Lekoff, Lindstedt, Law,50i 
Pherson, Green, Moore, Ass't. Coach Harper. Third Row : Dulin, Torch, Barger, P. Thrashe 
Puckett, Russman, Bryant, White, Stevens, Driscoll, Winston. Berry, Beatty, J. Thrasher. 



Hubbard, Durham, 



100 Yard Dash— 

1. Moore-Manual 

2. Sisson-Central 

3. Arthur-Ashland 

4. Dawson-Cov. Holmes 

5. Thomas-Lex. Dunbar 

Time- 



-9.9 



Moore tied the old state record of 9.9 

220 Yard Dash— 

1. Moore-Manual 

2. Sisson-Central 

3. Dawson-Cov. Holmes 

4. Ballard-Owensboro 

5. Arthur-Ashland 

Time— 22.2 

440 Yard Dash— 

1. Dawson-Cov. Holmes 

2. Moss-Hen. Douglass 

3. Arthur-Ashland 

4. Jewell-Shawnee 

5. Holder-Franklin Lincoln 

Time— 50.7 

880 Yard Run— 

1. Gallagher-Lex. Catholic 

2. Vetter-St, Xavier 

3. Sears-Somerset 

4. Wise-FortKnox 

5. Lapham-Bellevue 

Time— 2:00.5 

Gallagher set a new state record of 1 :54.6 



Mile Run — 

1. Gallag-her-Lex. Catholic 

2. Sears- Somerset 

3. Miller-Somerset 

4. Vetter-St. Xavier 

5. Lapham-Bellevue 

Time— 4:25.4 

Gallagher set a new state record of 4 :25.4 

120 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Beatty-Lafayette 

2. Moss-Hen. Douglass 

3. Breinich-Highlands 

4. Mullins-Manual 

5. Hammonds-Cov. Holmes 

Time— 14.3 

state record of 14.2 in 

180 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Beatty-Lafayette 

2. Smith-Seneca 

3. Wilder-Atherton 

4. Dix-Calloway Co. 

5. Brei.-.ich-Highlands 

Time— 20,2 

880 Yard Relay— 

1. Manual 

2. Central 

3. Owensboro 

4. Trinity 

5. Lafayette 



Mile Relay — 

1. Manual 

2. Hen. Douglass 

3. Atherton 

4. Fairdale 

5. Newport 



Time— 3:29.1 



Shot Put— 

1. Toye-Lafayette 

2. Seale-Valley 

3. Troutman- Valley 

4. Reif-Highlands 

5. Carter-Manual 

Distance— 50' IVz" 

Discus — 

1. Howes-Owensboro 

2. Toye-Lafayette 

3. Smith-Henderson 

4. McEwen-Butler 

5. Troutman-Valley 

Distance — 145' 2" 



preli] 



ary heat. 



Time— 1:30.8 



Broad Jump — 

1. Bacon-Manual 

2. Moore-Manual 

3. Trotter-Daviess Co. 

4. Rose-Pad. Tilghman 

5. Phillips-Henderson Co. 

Distance — 21' 
(Continued on Page Four) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL: XXV— NO. 1 



AUGUST, 1962 



$1.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

Loiusville, Kentucky, July 9, 19G2 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Lexingrton, Kentucky 
Dear Mr. Sanford: 

Pursuant to instructions received, we have made an audit 
of the books and records of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION for the period of one year, be- 
ffinnine July 1. 1961. and ending June 30, 1962. In addition, 
we have prepared and attached hereto, statements of the 
Receipts and Disbursements, which in our opinion, reflect the 
true financial condition of the Association as of June 30, 1962. 
The cash funds on Hand and U. S. Savings Bonds Accounts 
were found to be correct and verified by letter from your 
depositories. 

We find the records presented to us for the purpose of audit 
to be in agreement and in good condition. 

Respectfully submitted, 
JOHNSON-FOWLER & COMPANY 
By Huet L. Johnson 
202 Fincastle Building 
Louisville 2, Kentucky 
Certified Public Accountant 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 1961, TO JUNE 30, 1962 
STATEMENT OF 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in checking Account July 1, 1961 $ 32,576.37 

Annual Dues: 427 m $3.00 $ 1,281.00 

Officials* Dues: 

Football: 462 m $3,00 1,386.00 

Basketball: 1300 (« $3.00 3,900.00 

Reciprocity Officials: 

Footbball: 47 «i> $1.00 47.00 

Basketball: 42 @ $1.00 42.00 

Officials' Fines: 37 w $5.00 185.00 

Redeposits (Bad Checks made good) 21.00 

Advertising in Magazine 1,455.00 

Sale of Publications 308.85 

Ticket Sales-Annual Meeting 381.00 

Interest Received from Government Bonds 1,326.00 
Interest Received from 1st Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 400.00 

Interest Received from Union Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 400.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 

Tournament Account 104,268.70 

Refunds 552.58 

Receipts-State Baseball Tournament 825.50 

Football Playoffs : 

A & AA Ticket Sales 5,490.00 

AAA Profit 1,521.79 

AAA Football Game State Tax 120.46 

A & AA Program Profit 215.78 

A & AA Program State Tax 6.38 

Receipts-State Track Meet 661.00 $124,795.04 

$157,371.41 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 4,393.60 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal. $12,000) 8,775.52 

Expense-Commissioner's Office 475.98 

Ass't Commissioner's Salary (Base SaL 10,000) 7,810.94 

Travel Expense — Ass't Commissioner 991.49 

Clerical Help 6,061.89 

Janitor Service 935.94 

Postage 1,996.75 

Office Supplies 600.05 

Janitor Supplies 63.32 

Purchase of New Equipment 684.91 

Insurance 509.71 

Equipment Repairs & Sci-vice Contracts 551.37 

Building Repairs 64.60 

Utilities 1,012.15 

Telephone and Telegraph 1,375.15 

Fidelity Bonds 44.20 

Printing 2,667.75 

Appropriation to Kentucky Coaches Charity Ass'n__ 500.00 



Appropriation to K.A.P.O.S 

Purchase of National Federation Publicatii 
to National Federation Meetings- 
Federation Dues 

— NSGWS 



Delegat 
Nationa 
Girls E 
Rental 

Audit 

Bad Checks 

Miscellaneous Disbursements 

Meals — Annual Banquet 

Speaker — Annual Banquet 

Taxes and Withholdings: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld 

Social Security 

City Income Tax Withheld — 
State Income Tax Withheid _ 
Hospitalization Withheld ___ 
Retirement Fund Withheld _ 
Sales and Use Tax 



4,638.80 
1,187.80 
465.83 
666.01 
234.00 
900.00 
576.35 



Insuranc 
Magazin 



Ma 
Officials' D 



Subsidy 



200.00 

2,456.37 

3,836.94 

119.75 

300.00 

408.00 

50.00 

30.00 

102.68 

1.954.43 

50.00 



8.668.79 
10,033.25 



and Expenses-Clinics 
Printing and Miscellaneous Expense 

Schools for Officials 

Expenses-Regional Basketball 



Clii 



Officials' Emblems 



State Com 
Trophies a 
Officials 
Mileage ai 

(State 



mittee Expense 

nd Medals (State Meets) 

(State Meets) 

id Local Entertainment 
Meets) 



1,177.02 

97.98 

1,409.20 



355.32 

548.97 
181.70 



Golf: 



902.75 
910.12 
79.00 



857.52 

1,805.76 

173.87 



Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 

Trophies and Awards 

Miscellaneous Expenses 

Tennis: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 

Trophies and Balls 

Expenses-Tournament Managers — 

Track: 

Regional Expense 318.47 

Trophies and Medals 1,736.35 

State Committee Expense 805.49 

Officials 771.30 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 7,159.62 

New Equipment 

State Clinic 

Baseball: 

Refunds on District Tournament 

Deficits ___ 

Trophies and Medals 

Refunds on Regional Tournament 

Deficits 

Baseballs (State Tournament) 

Transportation (State Tournament) 

Meals (State Tournament) 

Ticket Sellers and Takers 

(State Tournament) 

Lodging (State Tournament) 

Scorer (State Tournament) 

Umpires (State Tournament) 

Expenses — Ass't Manager 

(State Tournament) 

State Clinic 

Grounds Men (State Tournament) 

K. H. S. A. A. Retirement Fund 

Cross Country: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Meet) 

Trophies and Awards 

Expenses — Regional Meets 

Expenses — State Meet 

Football Playoffs: 

Printing 



44.40 
94.40 


10,930.03 


2,315.02 
2,034.87 




354.84 

86.52 

597.60 

1,0^2.00 




50.00 
500.00 

25.00 
240.00 




62.00 
130.21 
35.00 


7,463.06 




3,600.00 


806.10 

644.31 

8.69 

125.75 


1,584.85 



(Continued on Page Three) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



August, 1962 



VOL. XXV— NO. 1 



MALE HIGH'S CHAMPIONSHIP RIFLE TEAM 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63) Georgetown 

Vice-President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64) Harlan 

Directors— Ralph C. Dorsev (1962-66) Horse Cave; Preston Hal- 
land (1961-65) Murray; Don R. Rawlings (1961-65) Danville; 
Foster J. Sanders (1962-66) Louisville; Oran C. Teater (1960-64) 
Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

2*ow tne Commissioned s Ufflce 

Football Clinics 

The 1962 clinics for football officials will 
be conducted by Athletic Director Edgar 
McNabb, Assistant Principal of the Beech- 
wood High School, South Fort Mitchell. Mr. 
McNabb has been the K. H. S. A. A. repre- 
sentative on the National Federation Foot- 
ball Committee for several years. The dates 
and sites of the clinics are as follows : August 
13, Ashland, 8:00 P.M.; August 14, Pikeville, 
8:00 P.M.; August 15, Pineville, 8:00 P.M.; 
August 20, Bowling Green, 8 :00 P.M. ; Aug- 
ust 21, Mayfield, 8:00 P.M.; August 22, Hen- 
derson, 8:00 P.M.; August 27, Newport, 8:0-0 
P.M. ; August 28, Lexington, 8 :00 P.M. ; Aug- 
ust 29, Louisville, 8:00 P.M. 

Registration of Officials 

Football and basketball officials previous- 
ly registered have received their renewal ap- 
plication cards for the 1962-63 school year. 
One hundred eighty-six officials failed to file 
their 1961-62 reports on or before the dead- 
line set by the Board of Control for the sub- 
mitting of reports, and it was necessary to 
impose fines on these officials who failed to 
comply with Association rules. It is an Assoc- 
iation requirement that each registered of- 
ficial attend the clinic in the sport in which 
he is registered. Four football officials and 
fifty-three basketball officials were suspend- 
ed in 1961-62 for failure to attend clinics. 



New Officers 



On July 28, 1962, the Board of Control 
was to elect a new President and Vice-Presi- 
dent. The magazine deadline was prior to 
this date. Write-ups of the new officers will 
appear in the September issue of the ATH- 
LETE. 




(Left to 
Willhoite, Stai 
Berry, Coach, 



Football Classes and Regions 

The football classes and regions for 1962, 
as determined recently by the K.H.S.A.A. 
Board of Control, are as follows : 
Class AAA 

Region I — Atherton, Central, DeSales, du- 
Pont Manual, Male, Shawnee, St. Xavier, 
Trinity. 

Region II — District 1: Butler, Fairdale, 
Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, Valley, 
Western ; District 2 : Durrett, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, Seneca, Waggener, Westport. 
Class AA 

Region I — District 1 : Bowling Green, 
Caldwell County, Christian County, Franklin- 
Simpson, Hopkinsville, Mayfield, Paducah, 
Warren County; District 2: Crittenden 
County, Daviess County, Henderson, Hen- 
derson County, Madisonville, Owensboro, 
Owensboro Catholic. 

Region II — Bryan Station, Clark County, 
Danville, Dunbar (Lexington), Elizabeth- 
town, Fort Knox, Franklin County, Henry 
Clay, K.M.I., Lafayette, LaRue County, 
Madison, Oldham County, St. Joseph, Shelby 
County, Somerset. 

Region III — Ashland, Boone County, 
Boyd County, Campbell County, Dixie 
Heights, Fleming County, Highlands, Hol- 
mes, Louisa, McKell, Newport, Newport 
Catholic, Rowan County, Russell, Wurtland. 

Region IV — District 1: Bell County, 
Corbin, Cumberland, Evarts, Hall, Hazel 
Green, Knox Central,Middlesboro ; District 
2: Belfry, Fleming-Neon, Hazard, Jenkins, 
Leslie County, M. C. Napier, Prestonsburg, 
Wheelwrig'ht, Whitesburg. 
Class A 

Region I — Attucks, Douglass (Hender- 
son), Douglass (Murray), Fort Campbell, 
Fulton, High Street, Lincoln (Franklin), 
Lincoln (Paducah), Morganfield, Murray, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



Page Three 



Providence, Russellville, Sturgis, Trigg 
County. 

Region II — Anderson, Aquinas, Bards- 
town, Bate, Bishop David Memorial, Berea, 
Campbellsville, Eminence, Frankfort, Greens- 
burg, Geoi'getown, Glasgow, Harrodsburg, 
Jessamine County, Lancaster, Lebanon, 
Lincoln Institute, Louisville Country Day, 
Mercer County, Metcalfe County, Old Ken- 
tucky Home, Shelbyville, Shepherdsville, 
Springfield, Stanford, Tompkinsville, Ver- 
sailles. 

Region III — Beechwood, Bellevue, Bour- 
bon County, Carlisle, Carrollton, Catletts- 
burg, Dayton, DuBois, Elkhorn City, Harri- 
son Coun'ty, Irvine, Lloyd, Ludlow, M.M.I. , 
Mt. Sterling, Morgan County, Paintsville, 
Paris, Pikeville, Raceland, Western (Paris). 

Region IV — District 1 : Barbourville, 
Lily, London, Lynn Camp, Pineville, Wil- 
liamsburg ; District 2 : Buckhorn, Dike 
Combs, East Main (Lynch), Harlan, Loyall, 
Rosenwald (Harlan), Wallins, West Main 
(Lynch). 

FRANKFORT GOLF TEAM WINS 




(Left to Right) : Coach Lykins, Wainscott, Pulliam. Con- 
way, and Long of the Frankfort High School; (Inset) Spragens 
of the Lebanon High School, individual champion. 

The Frankfort High School won the 1962 State High School 
Golf Tournament, held at the Fort Knox Lindsey Golf Course 
on May 22-23. with a score of 626. The Waggener High School 
was second with 626. Other team scores were: K. M. I., 629; 
Atherton, 634 ; Scottsville, 642 ; Paintsville, 644 ; St. Xavier, 
644 ; Lebanon, 651 ; Bowling Green College, 654 ; Trinity, 655 ; 
Lafayette, 661 ; Clark County, 666 ; Dixie Heights, 670 ; Warren 
County, 687 ; Country Day, 688 ; Owensboro Catholic, 691 ; Bowl- 
ing Green, 700 ; Oldham County, 703 ; and Shawnee, 739. The 
tournament was managed by Athletic Director John W. Hackett 
of the Fort Knox High School. 

Rob Spragens of the Lebanon High School, was the indi- 
vidual champion. He tied at 145 with Joe Lenahan of Trinity, 
and won the title on the extra hole. A year ago Spragens and 
Lenahan played off for second place in the K. H. S. A. A. 
Tournament, and Lenahan won. 

Individual scores of some of the tournament leaders were 
as follows ; 

145 — Spragens (Lebanon) ; Lenahan (Trinity) 

148— Acree (Waggener) 

149— Williamson (Dixie Heights) 

150 — Potter (Atherton) ; Danahy (K. M. I.) 

152— Conway (Frankfort) ; Mullen (Tilghman) ; Wainscott 
(Frankfort) 

153 — Auge (Beechwood) ; Meek (Paintsville) ; Johnson 
(Pleasure Ridge) 

154— Willoughby (Scottsville) 

155 — Doll (Good Shepherd) ; McDermott (K. M. I.) 

156 — Adams (Berea) ; Stinnett (Owensboro) ; Long (Frank- 
fort) 

157— Smith (Lafayette) ; Sickles (Scottsville) ; Leibson 
(Atherton) 

158 — Olyniec (St. Joseph) ; Shinkle (Eastern) Acree (Wag- 



gener) ; Gilbert (College) ; Meek (Paintsville) ; Thomas (Tilgh- 
man) 

159 — Criswell (Paris) ; Steers (Franklin-Simpson) ; Mussel- 
man (St. Xavier) : Kreutz (Lafayette) ; Rogers (K.M.I.) 

160 — Burrice (Waggener) ; Luxon (Madison) : McQueen 
(Lafayette) ; Leishman (Waggener) ; Kirkland (Owensboro) ; 
Gosney (St. Xavier). 

AUDIT 

(Continued from Page One) 

Trophies and Awards 782.10 

Transportation 645.00 

Lodging 486.00 

Meals 1.197.00 

Officials 260.00 

Ticket SeSlers, Takers & Guards.. 118.00 

Miscellaneous 70.00 

P. A. Announcer & Scoreboard 30.00 

Regional Deficits 536.74 

Insurance 47.83 

Footballs 71.89 

Statisticians 40.36 

Incidental Expenses — Board Grants 800.00 5,166.59 

Rifle Marksmanship: 

Mileage and Local Entertainment 

(State Tournament) 277.24 

Trophies and Awards 30.75 

Miscellaneous expenses 33.14 

Officials (State Tournament) 36.40 377.53 

Total Disbursements $112,948.83 

Receipts $157,371,41 

Disbursements 112,948.83 

Cash Balance $ 44,422.58 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement. June 30, 1962 $ 44,893.04 

Less Outstanding Checks: 

No. 540 $ .30.00 

No. 883 21.00 

No. 888 30.00 

No. 899 83.05 

No. 900 19.50 

No. 901 116.97 

No. 902 169.94 470.46 

True Bank Balance June 30, 1962 S 44,422.58 

FUNDS ON HAND: 

Cash Balance — First Security National 

Bank & Trust Co $ 44,422.58 

U. S. Savings Bonds (Value June 30, 

1962) 48,436.30 

Savings Account — 1st Fed. Savings & 

Loan Ass'n 10,000.00 

Savings Account — Union Fed. 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 10,000.00 

Total Funds on Hand, June 30, 1962 $112,858.88 

Estimated Value of K.H.S.A.A. Building 

and Equipment $ 98,943.00 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
1962 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales $144,033.25 

Profit on Program 1,824.06 

Radio Fees 2,470.00 

Redeposits 96.00 $148,423.31 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing 1,138.41 

Trophies and Awards 670.65 

Postage 200.00 

Insurance 639.40 

8,000.00 

1,478.26 

4,148.76 

5,498.43 

9,000.00 

60.00 

1,743.52 

480.00 

240.00 



Incidental Expense — (16) Teams 

Transportation 

Lodging 

Meals 

Coliseum Rental 

Organist 

Officials' Fees and Expenses 

Scorers and Timers 

Shot Chart Keepers and Statisticians 

Ticket Sellers, Ticket Takers and 

Guards 

Public Address Announcers 

Telephone and Telegraph 

Films 

Towel Service 

Miscellaneous Expense Tour. Mgr 

Honoraruims and Expenses — Ass't 

Tour. Managers 

State Sales Tax 

Detective Service 

Bad Checks 

Transfer of Funds — Amount Tn 

K.H.S.A.A. 



4,438.50 
180.00 

54.42 
350.00 
105.00 

59.95 

923.42 
4.201.89 
448.00 
96.00 $ 44,154.61 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



Thirtieth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 

Shawnee Park, Louisville, May 14-15, 1962 
SINGLES 



Cooper-St. Xavier 


Cooper 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

- Cooper 
6-0 : 6-1 




Bye 


SEMI- 




Miller 






Harralson 
6-3; 6-4 




Bye 


Cooper 


Harralson 
6-2 ; 6-1 






FINALS 


Gatewood-Central 


McConnell 
9-7; 6-2 




Harralson-Owensboro 






Bishop 
6-2 ; 6-0 






MeConnel! 

(forfeit) 




Wilder-Danville 


Cooper 


Hamilton 
6-2 : 6-4 




6-1 ; 6-1 




Hamilton-Trinity 






Greensberg-Harrodsburg 




McConnell 
6-1: 6-1 








McConnell-Eastern 


Evans 
6-0; 6-2 




Rock-LaRue Co. 


Gauspohl 








Gauspohl-BellevTie 








Bye 


Simms 




Evans 








Evans-Berea 


Simms 
6-3; 6-0 


Schad 


Bye 


Simms 


6-4 ; 3-6 ; 6-4 


Simms-Bellevue 




Bye 






Matos 
6-2: 6-3 








Schnelle-Highlands 


Wade ■ 
6-2; 6-2 




Matos-K.M.I. 




Wade 
6-3 : 6-3 












Wade-Lafayette 


Schad 
6-1 : 6-2 


Schad 
6-0 : 6-0 










Barr 

6-1; 6-1 








Farmer- Henderson 


Garth 

6-3; 4-6; 6-3 




Barr-University 




Garth 
6-0 ; 6-1 








Garth-Waggener 






Ayers-Warren Co. 






Schuhmann 
6-2; 6-1 




Barnes-Hopkinsville 


Schad 
6-0; 6-0 






Hawes 








Hawes-Owensboro 






Bye 




Schad-St. Xavier 


Schad 








Bye 





TRACK MEET 

( Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
High Jump — 

1. Beatty-Lafayette 

2. Muddy-Hancock Co. 

3. Monarch-Pleasure Ridge Pk. 

4. Scharber-Daviess Co. 
4. Myers-Highlands 

4. Garr-Somerset 

Height: 6' %" 
Pole Vault— 

1. Wehrung-Daviess Co. 

2. Ramsey-Harlan Rosenwald 

3. Scharber-Daviess Co. 
3. French-Port Knox 

5. Beyersdoerfer-Highlands 
5. Hill-Henry Clay 

5. James-Franklin Simpson 
5. McCuiston-Calloway Co. 
5. Funderburk-Greensburg 
5. Barnett-Murray 



5. Masden-Boone Co. 
5. Spurlock-Lafayette 

Height: 12' 3V4" 

Wehrang set a new state record of 12' ZV4.'* 

TOTAL POINTS 

Manual 49 

Lafayette 30% 

Central 16 

Henderson Douglass 16 

Owensboro 14 

Daviess County 12'/2 

Holmes 12 

Lexington Catholic 12 

Somerset 11 

Atherton 9 

Valley 8 

Highlands IVi 

Ashland 7 

St. Xavier 6 

Fort Knox 4'/2 

Fairdale 4 



Hancock County 4 

Harlan Rosenwald 4 

Seneca 4 

Trinity 4 

Henderson City 3 

Pleasure Ridge Park 3 

Calloway County 2'/4 

Bellevue 2 

Butler 2 

Newport 2 

Shawnee 2 

Tilghman 2 

Lexington Dunbar 1 

Franklin Lincoln 1 

Henderson County 1 

Boone County y^ 

Franklin Simpson V4 

Greensburg i/J 

Henry Clay '/g 

Murray 14 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

Sports Center, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 
June 6 - 7, 1962 



Owensboro (2) 


Owensboro (3) 


Owensboro (1) 








Ashland (0) 


Bowling Green (1) 




Bowling Green (13) 


Manual (4) 




Livingston Central (5) 


Manual (6) 


Manual - 
Champion 


Maniial (3) 
Newport Cath. (0) 




Madison Central (3) 




Madison Central (2) 






Somerset (1) 













Third Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament For Girls 

Shawnee Park, Louisville, May 11-12, 1962 

SINGLES 



Sullivan-Waggener 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

Sullivan 
6-1; 6-2 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

Sullivan 
6-0; 6-3 




Nelson-Franklin Co. 
Squires- Greensburg 


FINALS 


Rodmam 
6-1; 6-3 




Schey 
6-4; 6-4 




Rodman-FranHin Co. 




Steilberg 
6-0; 6-1 


Sullivan 




11-9; 6-1 


Steilberg-Presentation 


Stafford 
6-3; 4-6; 7-5 


Furgerson-Hopkinsville 


Schey 
6-2; 6-3 




Schey-Southern 


Simmons 
6-3; 6-0 


Gephart-Presentation 


Simmons 
6-0; 6-1 




Simmons-Collegiate 






Nolan 
6-4; 6-2 




Schey-Southern 


Stafford 
6-1; 6-0 






Stafford 
6-3; 6-0 




Stafford-Waggener 








Davis-Henderson 


Thoney 
6-2; 6-0 








Thoney-Bellevue 






Wyan-Hazel Green 







Sullivan 
6-2; 6-2 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



The Flying Dutchman 

The Dutchman spent three days in the 
mountains this summer helping the City of 
Hazard set up a recreation program. In that 
City lives a Kentuckian who is in a class all 
by himself. Reference is made to Willie 
Dawahare, Mayor of the town. 

Mayor Dawahare loves kids and wants a 
wholesome recreation program launched. 
His enthusiasm caused him to sound like 
Coach Ed Diddle at the Hazard's Lion's Club 
where Governor Bert Combs and Carlos 
Oakley were honored guests. Mayor Willie 
introduced The Flying Dutchman in this 
manner, "Gentlemen, here is the greatest 
Recreation Consultant we could find who 
would come to Hazard and do this job for 
nothing!" 

Carlos Oakley, now the Chief of the State 
Welfare Department, gave many years of 
service on the Board of Control of the K. H. 
S. A. A. Carlos was a fine quarterback at 
Western when the Dutchman was playing 
there several decades ago. His father used to 
say that he invested $5,000.00 in a college 
education for Carlos and all he got was a 
quarterback. Nobody laughed at this joke in 
Hazard — but if you think about it a while, it 
is funny. I think. 

Roy Eversole, Paul Wright, and Jim 
Caudill were there. Jim said that Paul wrote 
the introduction for the energetic Mayor. 
This occasion took the Dutchman back to the 
year of 1930 when he was introduced as 
Coach of Memorial High School by the Chair- 
man of the School Board as follows: "Tax- 
payers, that little fellow sitting on the end 
is the Coach. That's the best we could do on 
the money you gave us!" 

Willie Dawahare is the first winner of the 
Corn Cob Pipe of Honor for this season be- 
cause of his unselfish service to the youth of 
his City. Every Kid we passed waved or yell- 
ed to him. You would think he was the daddy 
of them all. 

In Hazard stands a beautiful school. It 
will long be a monument to a great Ken- 
tuckian. His name is Roy G. Eversole. Few 
men attain the stature of Roy Eversole. He 
has detei-mination, a quiet dignity, leader- 
ship, and a love for people. It is a credit to 
this mountain City that it has immortalized 
his achievements with this useful monument 
during his time. Roy is a former member of 
the K. H. S. A. A. Board of Control. 

Hazard's football Coach, Paul Wright, is 
moving over to Louisa while Goebel Ritter, 
the Basketball mentor, has been lured to 
Whitesburg. Incidentally, Goebel will be one 




Mayor Dawahare 

of the sixteen Regional Representatives at 
the School for Basketball Officials in Lexing- 
ton this month. When you are in Hazard, 
visit Jim Caudill. Jim's beautiful home is 
high on the mountain by LaCitadelle, over- 
looking Hazard. 

Sports are a "Way of Life" in the Ken- 
tucky mountains. At a round table "Bull 
Session" on top of that high peak, everybody 
agreed that to have a good sports program 
there must be good officiating. To have good 
officiating a sound training program must 
be offered. The K. H. S. A. A. has one of the 
finest training programs for sports officials 
in the Nation. You are invited to attend the 
School for Basketball Officials in Lexington 
on August 12 and 13. The place is the 
Phoenix Hotel. 

Indiana's Commissioner Colonel L. V. 
Phillips has retired. The new Commissioner 
of the Indiana High School Athletic Assoc- 
iation is the popular and highly-respected 
Phil Eskew, formerly of Huntington. Because 
of his national influence, Kentucky's Com- 
missioner affectionately gave Colonel Phil- 
lips the name, "Kingfish." "The Hoosier" 
Athletic Chief promptly dubbed Ted Sanford 
"Andy" and Joe Billy Mansfield "Lightning." 
This "Grand Order of The Kingfish" caused 
a citation to be presented to Colonel Phillips 
at an honor luncheon in Indianapolis in July. 
It was a grand occasion for a "Grand Guy." 

A telephone call has just come in from 
Irby Hummer of Hodgenville, wanting the 
Dutchman to come to the "Birthplace of 
Lincoln" to lay out a golf course for the town. 
Irby says his group wants the best Recrea- 
tion Consultant available for nothing. 

Here we go again, Willie! 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



Page Seven 



TENNIS DOUBLES— BOYS 



St Xavier 


QUARTER- 
FINALS 

St. Xavier 


SEMI- 
FINALS 

St. Xavier 
6-1; 6-1 






FINALS 


Bye 


Harlan 
6-3; 6-0 






Warren Co. 


University 
6-4; 6-4 






St. Xavier 


Harlan 


Trinity 

7-5; 2-6; 6-2 


6-1; 6-1 


DeSales 


Bellevue 
8-6; 6-3 




Trinity 


University 




University 


Eastern 
6-0; 6-3 




Bye 


Eastern 
6-1; 6-2 


Eastern 




Owensboro 


Highlands 
6-0; 6-2 


Highlands 
LaRue Co. 


Bellevue 
6-1; 6-1 


Hopkinsville 
6-3; 6-4 


Hopkinsville 
M. M. L 
Bellevue 




Bellevue 








Bye 







St. Xavier 
6-3; 6-2 



Schools' Ratings on Basketball Officials 



The following ratings were received on basketball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1961-62. The numbers 
following each name represent respectively the number of 
Excellent, Good, Fair, and Poor ratings given to the official. 

Abell, James A., 2-6-3-1 ; Abernathy, George R., 4-18-8-0 ; 
Adams, Troy E., 3-6-1-2 ; Adams, William M., 4-1-4-0 ; Adkins, 
Raymond C, 27-12-3-1 ; Adkins, V/endell L., 1-9-2-0 ; Akins, 
Charlie, 1-24-1-1 : Akridge, Dean, 10-9-3-2 ; Albright, Gerald F., 
0-2-1-1; Alexander, Donald, 0-3-1-1: Alexander, Rex, 13-23-1-0; 
Alford, William C., 2-2-0-2 ; Allen. Ed L., 2-2-3-0 ; Allen, Harry 
G., 0-1-0-0 ; Allen James D., 1-0-0-0 ; Allen, James W., 0-0-0-1 ; 
Allen, Lowry R., 10-28-6-3 ; Allen, Nelson Robert, 41-25-7-9 ; 
Alley, Joe, 1-0-0-0 ; Almon, James H., 0-12-5-0 ; Andere, Raleigh 
A., 6-5-0-0 ; Arnold, Kenneth, 66-28-3-3 ; Ayers, Henry, 2-5-2-0 ; 

Back, Bill, 9-4-1-1 ; Baird, Bill, 4-0-0-0 ; Baker, James E., 
7-20-1-1 : Baker, Joe R., 0-1-0-0 ; Baker, Robert M., Jr., 3-10- 
6-0 ; Ball, Delbert, 4-7-3-1 ; Ballaban, Thomas, 4-7-3-1 ; Ballard, 
Jack H., 14-13-0-2 ; Ballard, Shirley, 0-2-1-0 ; Ballinger, Richard 
L., 2-6-2-4 ; Bankemper, Thomas, 6-10-0-0 ; Barker, Bob R., 
5-8-2-1 ; Barker, Walter D., 5-8-1-2 ; Barlow, Bill B., 3-3-2-1 ; 
Barlow, Bill R., 4-8-1-3 ; Barton, Walter, 0-4-1-0 ; Baskin, 
Sylvester, 0-13-2-0 ; Bates, Gardner, Jr.. 17-15-4-2 ; Baughn, 
E. L., 8-27-4-2 ; Beasley, Amon E., 0-0-5-0 ; Beasley, Donald, 
0-0-1-0 ; Bell, Clarence T., 4-12-0-0 ; Bell, Henry B., 0-1-0-2 ; 
Bell, Jimmy D., 0-5-5-2 ; Benedict, Johnny, 10-7-0-0 ; Bennett, 
Bert A., 0-1-1-0 ; Bennett, Gene, 5-6-1-1 ; Bentley, James, 1-0-8-1 ; 
Benzinger, Joseph, Jr., 0-0-1-0 ; Beringer, William F., 2-4-0-0 ; 
Bero, James J., 1-1-1-0 ; Berry, William, 1-1-0-0 ; Bibb, William 
C, 14-17-1-2 ; Bickers, Homer G., 3-16-6-0 ; Black, Amos, 0-6-2-1 ; 
Blackburn, Viley O., 3-9-2-1 ; Blankenship, Zeb, 0-1-1-0 ; Blevins, 
Boone, Jr., 3-11-3-0; Bocook, Earl, 2-0-0-0; Bocook, George 
Allen, 3-1-1-0 ; Boehm, Robert "Ted", 4-10-3-2 ; Bohan, James 
J., 0-0-2-0 : Boone, E. Winton, 2-3-4-3 ; Borden, W. B. "Jack", 
3-24-5-0; Bowlin, Bob, 15-6-1-0; Bowman, Earl G. "Dick", 
8-12-0-2 ; Boyles, Paul E., 20-9-6-3 ; Bradshaw, Bill, 4-19-7-0 ; 
Bradshaw, Frank, 3-3-2-0 ; Branaman, Bill, Jr., 28-29-6-2 ; 
Braughler, David L., 4-10-1-0 ; Breeden, W. Charles, 0-4-0-0 ; 
Brewer, Randell, 9-5-3-0 ; Brichler, Joe A., 4-9-3-0 ; Bridges, 
Bennie E. 28-19-3-0 ; Briscoe, Hubert. 1-0-0-0 ; Brizendine, 
Vic, 24-31-10-4 ; Brown, E. C, 7-24-2-4 ; Brown, J. Carlton, 
8-29-3-2; Brown, James A., 2-5-0-0; Brown, James W., 19-22- 



4-3 ; Brown, John W. "Scoop", 17-10-0-1 ; Brown, Leonard C, 
0-1-1-0 ; Brown, Paul, 4-6-1-0 ; Brown, Thomas, 1-6-1-1 ; Brown- 
ing, Earl, 7-9-1-1 ; Browning, William H., 0-0-1-0 ; Brueck, 
Joe C, Jr., 0-0-0-2; Brugh. Walter J., 7-16-3-3; Brummett, 
Joseph W., 15-13-3-0 ; Bruner, Jack C, 38-20-2-1 ; Buchanan, 
David R., 1-1-0-0 ; Buis, Nathaniel, 19-25-0-6 ; Bunnell, Kenneth 
L., 0-18-1-0 ; Burchett. Lanier S., 6-12-2-1 ; Burke, Harry R., 
0-4-0-0 ; Burkett, Garvis, 0-2-1-0 ; Butcher, Clifford, 1-1-0-1 ; 
Butcher, Granville "Bo", 10-15-2-4 ; Butler, Donald A., 0-1-0-1 ; 
Butler Jack, 1-0-0-0 ; Butner, Billy M., 5-2-0-0 ; 

Cain, Ronnie, 0-6-2-0 ; Caldwell, James, 6-13-4-0 ; Camp- 
bell, French, 10-19-7-8; Campbell, John, Jr., 16-12-0-4; Canter, 
John, 3-6-0-1 ; Cantrell, Hubert, 0-2-0-1 ; Caple, Harold, 3-1-1-0 ; 
Carpenter, Leonard F., 3-9-1-1 ; Carroll, Joe E., 2-2-0-0 ; Cartee, 
Ralph, Jr., 16-10-2-1 ; Carter, Donald R., 0-2-1-0 ; Cash, Randall 
E., 1-9-2-2 ; Cassady, Charles W., 2-14-5-3 ; Cassady, Richard, 
0-0-0-1 ; Cassell, Curtis, 6-7-3-1 ; Caster, Boyd J., Jr., 1-0-0-0 ; 
Castle, Jack T., 0-1-0-0 ; Castle, Quentin, 0-7-3-4 ; Gates, Tommy, 
1-13-3-1 ; Gathers, Bob, 13-6-1-0 ; Cathey, Gene S., 7-37-9-5 ; 
Catlett, David L., 2-6-3-2; Cecil, John O., Jr., 0-4-4-2; 
Chafin, David L., 0-2-0-1 ; Chambers, William Virgil, 0-1-1-1 ; 
Chaney, Rex, 4-3-2-1 ; Chattin, Charles, 11-18-6-0 ; Choate, Glen, 
0-1-0-0 ; Clark. Owen B., 1-0-0-0 ; Clarke, Lt. Edward F., 
0-2-1-0 ; Cobb, Mike, 0-6-1-0 : Coleman, L. J. "Duke", 19-17-6-3 ; 
Collins, Hubert, 5-8-7-0 ; Collins, Keith, 6-0-0-0 : Collins, Larry, 
1-0-0-0 ; Combs, Keith A., 29-16-3-2 ; Combs, Roy Donald, 
1-4-4-1 ; Combs, W. Eugene, 4-7-6-2 ; Combs, William E., 
27-9-6-1 ; Conley, George D., 25-5-0-0 ; Conley, Orville D., 
4-2-6-0 ; Conley, Ted L., 6-19-9-2 ; Conley. Tom W., 0-0-1-1 ; 
Connell, Jerry L., 8-7-0-0 ; Conway, James M., 0-4-1-1 ; Cooper, 
Hewlett, 1-1-2-0 ; Cooper, John F., 0-0-1-0 ; Cooper, Warren, 
22-12-0-0; Corley, William H., 0-2-0-0; Cornett, Billy J., 0-2-0-0; 
Cornett, John M.. 4-3-1-1- ; Courtney, Walt, 1-2-2-1 : Cox 
Charles Glenn, 0-3-3-1 : Cox, Rufus A., 3-5-0-1 ; Cox, Ralph, 
0-3-1-0 ; Coyle, Ernest T., 1-2-2-1 ; Craft, Bill, 21-25-2-1 ; Crager, 
Bobby F., 4-4-5-4 ; Craig, John G., 0-1-0-0 ; Crawford. Donald 
Ray, 0-9-1-1 ; Crawford, Tom, 4-15-1-1 ; Creech. Harvey, 
0-3-1-0 ; Creech, Harvey J., 0-2-1-0 ; Creekmore, Ken, 0-7-1-2 ; 
Crutcher, James W., 17-26-2-3 ; Gulp, Ronald D., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Culp, Willard E., 3-12-1-3 ; Cummins, Albert, 11-14-8-0 ; Cum- 
mins, Curtis, 2-6-1-1 ; Cunningham, Julian, 7-12-1-0 ; Current, 
Ellis Ray, 1-17-5-2; 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



TENNIS DOUBLES— GIRLS 



QUARTEn- 
FINALS 



SEMI- 
FINALS 



FINALS 



Bye 



Henderson 



Murray 



Waggener 



Bye 



Somerset 



Highlands 



Shawnee 



Bye 



Lafayette 



Bye 



Franklin Co. 



Hopkinsville 



Bye 



Atherton 



Henderson 
(forfeit) 



Waggener 



Highlands 
3-6; 6-3; 7-5 



Shawnee 



Lafayette 



Franklin Co. 
6-2; 6-1 



Hopkinsville 



Atherton 
7-5; 6-2 



Highlands 
6-3; 8-6 



Atherton 
6-1; 6-3 



Shawnee 
6-4; 6-3 



Franklin Co. 
6-4; 6-4 



Shawnee 
6-4; 5-7; 6-1 



Atherton 
6-2; 6-2 



; R., l-n-3-0; 
0-3-0-4: Edelen, 



Dalton, Ray H., 1-9-5-1 ; Dame. L. J., 6-26-7-2 : Damico, 
Ernie, 0-0-0-1 : Daniels, Robert A., 1-0-0-4 ; Daugherty, L. B., 
0-10-3-3 : Davenport, Robert B.. 4-1G-8-0 ; Davis, Bunny, 5-10-2-0 ; 
Davis, Curtis, 0-9-0-1 : Davis, David Allen. 2-1-0-0 ; Davis, Don, 
6-12-1-1 : Davis. Harold T., 1-18-6-2 : Davis, Ralph E., 14-14-4-3 ; 
Davis, Ronnie, 0-1-1-0 : Davis, William P., 0-8-0-0 : Dawson, 
Alby, 0-1-0-0; Day, Bill E., 0-2-1-0; Deim. Martin F., 3-3-0-1; 
De Moisey, J. Fox, 13-25-0-1; Demunbrun, Murphy M., 3-11-3-0; 
Denekas, Raymond D.. 0-1-1-0 ; Denton, Charles, 2-3-0-1 ; De- 
Vary. Bill, 21-11-0-0; Dickerson. William B.. 1-0-0-0; DiMuzio, 
Robert, 8-18-4-0 ; Disken. Jim, 1-7-1-0 ; Dobson, Kenneth, 2- 
14-5-0; Dodson. Winston, 0-1-0-0; Doll. Louis E., 0-2-0-0; Dorsey, 
James, 1-4-4-0: Dotson. W. S., 0-6-1-0; Drake, Neal M., 1-0-0-0; 
Drake, Richard R., 25-37-4-0 ; Bartram, Draughn, 14-6-3-1 ; 
Driskell, Earl, Jr., 9-13-4-6: Driver, Bobby, 0-11-2-0; Duerson, 
William Robert, 10-25-4-2 : Duff, Birchel, 3-4-0-0 : Dunaway, 
Adrian, 1-3-0-0 ; Duncan, Earl S., 3-4-1-0 ; Duncan, James H., 
0-5-2-2; Durkin, Jack H, 11-25-1-0; D: 

Eades, Jim, 0-6-0-0 ; Eaton, James 1 
Ben R., 8-10-0-0; Edwards, Donald A., 12-12-3-0; Edwards 
Glenn, 2-1-0-0 ; Edwards. Lloyd, 0-0-2-0 ; Eldridge, James R. 
1-2-2-2 ; Elkins, R. Percy, 3-4-10-2 ; Ellington, James E.. 9-10 
4-0 ; Elliott, Carroll L., 17-34-7-2 : Elovitz. Carl. 2-7-1-0 
Embry, Dr.. Chalmer P.. 12-10-3-1 ; Ensslin. Charles W., 1-1 
0-0 ; Evans, James, 0-7-2-0 ; 

Fairchild, Kenton, 4-5-1-0; Fallon, Robert, 3-3-0-1; Fand 
rich, William. 0-3-3-1 : Farley, Jimmy, 0-3-1-1 ; Farmer, Johr 
Clay, 1-2-0-0; Farmer, Ralph, 5-11-7-1; Feher, A. J., 1-10-2-0 
Feix Al, 4-4-1-1 ; Ferrell. Doctor T.. 26-6-0-0 ; Ferrell. Jimmy 
0-0-2-0 : Fields, Jerry J., 5-9-8-3 ; Fields. Joe D.. 0-1-1-0 ; Figg, 
Charles Raymond. 0-1-0-0 ; Finley. Albert R.. 1-0-1-1 ; Fisher 
George D., 0-1-1-0; Flaugher. Allen, 9-11-1-1 ; Florence 
2-1-0-0 ; Floyd, Raymond, 0-0-2-0 ; Fly, Edward Lynn, 
Flynn, Robert D., 33-33-6-1 : Ford, Joe 2-23-2-0 ; Ford 
0-2-1-0 ; Foster, Berryman E., 13-10-0-2 ; Foster, J. W. 
Foster. William R.. 15-23-6-1 ; Fraley. Bill, 5-12-2-1 ; 
George. 12-8-4-1 ; Francis. Wendell. 0-4-2-1 ; Franklin 
4-11-1-2; Erasure, Lois E., 0-1-0-1; Frazer, Tom Roe, 
Freeman, John W., 1-0-0-0 ; Freese, Ollie, 2-9-7-2 : Fritz, Sher- 
man, 22-24-5-2 ; Frye, Gilbert Lee, 2-3-0-2 ; Fugate, E. Hugh, 



Darrell 
0-2-0-0 
Sid M. 
0-0-1-0 
Francis 
Robert, 
0-5-0-2 



5-4-0-2 ; Fuller, John R., Jr., 2-14-4-1 ; Furgerson, W. W.. 
0-24-6-0 ; Fuson, Shelvie. 1-7-0-0 ; Fyffe. Robert, 0-1-1-0 ; 

Gabbard, John B., 1-4-0-1 ; Gaddis, George M., 0-3-0-4 ; 
Gaither, Gene, 4-21-2-0 ; Gaither, Jack, 4-20-2-0 ; Gardner, 
Howard, 11-34-11-3; Geiser, Robert, 0-5-1-0; Gentry, Charles 
C, 2-1-1-1: Gerding, Jim, 0-1-0-0; Gettler. John F.. 3-22-3-1; 
Gibson, Fred W.. 9-37-13-4 ; Gilbert. Gerald L.. 15-20-3-4 ; Gill, 
Joe. 0-4-1-0 : Gillem, Gail W., 0-1-2-0 ; Gillespie, Robert C, 
4-16-6-0; Gilligan, Jack, 1-2-0-0; Girodano, Al, 10-19-1-0; Glays- 
brook, James, 0-3-2-0 ; Godbev, Truman, 1-1-0-0 ; Goff, Reathel, 
2-2-0-0; Coins, Herman, 3-7-1-0; Goley. Jim, 2-19-6-1; Golden, 
Billy Joe, 49-18-0-0; Golden, Laura Lou, 5-6-1-0; 
E., 9-19-9-5 : Goodall. Walter J.. 2-3-2-0 ; 
Gour, Robert A.. 18-47-9-2 ; Gourley, Harold E., 3-0-0-0 ; Cover, 
Robert J., 9-7-6-2 ; Grace, Charles K.. 3-1-1-0 ; Grace, H. E., 
Jr., 3-13-1-2 : Graham, James, 2-10-10-2 ; Gray, Raymond, 0-4-7- 
; Green, Walter, 25-17-1-4 ; Greer, Jim, 0-1-0-0 ; Griffith, Ed- 
win Dale, 0-3-0-0; Grigsby, Pete, Jr., 11-9-7-1; Grisham, Jesse 
R., 7-7-4-2 ; Grooms, Roger. 0-2-0-0 ; Gustafson, Al, Jr., 29-22- 
6-5; 

Haap, Virgil, 0-4-0-0; Hadden, Newell, P.. Jr.. 11-13-6-1 
Hafele, Charles Hargis, 0-2-0-0 ; Hagan, Joe '•Red", 17-23-1-1 
Hagedorn, Thomas, 10-12-5-1 : Hale, Don C, 17-7-3-4 ; Hale, 
John, 0-11-0-0; Hall, John R., 1-1-1-0; Hall, Mac, 1-1-0-0 
Hamilton, Steve. 2-2-2-1 ; Hammons. Norman, 5-22-4-0 ; Hand- 
Ian, Raymond L., 4-9-1-0 ; Hardin. Carl, 0-2-0-4 ; Hardin, Jack 
H,, 4-4-2-1 ; Hardin, William R.. 3-7-0-1 ; Hardy, J. Alvin, 0-1- 
0-0: Hargis, Bobby S., 15-27-1-0: Harper, Robie, Jr., 4-11-6-1; 
Harned, Vic, 7-11-2-1 ; Harrell, Bill D., 2-0-0-1 : Harris, Jack 
Q.. 6-9-0-1; Harris. Joe D.. 0-6-1-1; Harrison, Fred W., 5-0-1-0: 
Harvey, Bennie, 10-6-1-0 ; Harville, Robert, 8-17-4-2 ; Hatfield, 
Cecil E., 2-4-0-0 ; Hatler, Elton L., 0-0-1-0 : Hatter, Jack, 1-3- 
2-0 ; Hatter, William F., 0-2-1-0 ; Hayden, Samuel J.. 6-17-3-1 : 
Hayes, Douglas J., 0-2-3-3 ; Haynes, John, 4-6-4-2 ; Haynes, 
Ohlin, 0-1-1-0 : Heath. Lary D.. 2-2-0-0 : Heitzman, Warren E.. 
2-O-0-0 : Heldman, Dr. John, Jr., 2-0-0-0 ; Hendon, L. J.. 0-3-5-1 ; 
Hendricks, Dudley, 1-3-2-1 ; Henley, Jimmy L., 0-4-0-1 ; Hen- 
son, Tony, 2-19-0-1; Herold, Clarence E., 0-5-0-0; Hertzberger, 
Robert, 2-2-1-0 : Hewitt, R. T.. 25-36-1-0 ; Hicks, Floyd E., 
0-1-0-2; Hill. Earl F.. 6-11-8-2; Hill. Martin, 2-9-0-0: Hitch, 
Kenneth L.. 0-2-0-0 ; Hiten. John W., 8-20-1-0 ; Hitt, Billy D., 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



Page Nine 



MALE WINS RIFLE CHAMPIONSHIP 

Louisville Male High School won the first State Rifle 
Tournament sponsored by the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association. Eight teams participated in the championship, 
which was held at Millersburg Military Institute on May 5. 
1962. The tournament was managed by Capt. William G. Adams 
of M. M. I. 

Male, coached by Master Sgt. Robert O. Berry, finished 
with 1,870 out of a possible 2,000 points. Owensboro High 
School was runner-up with 1,849, and Ashland High School 
was third with 1,796. 

The individual champion was Givan of Male, with 388. 
Staib of Male was second with 384. Owensboro shooters occu- 
pied the third, fourth, and fifth spots in the tourney. Wissing 
was third with 378, the same score turned in by Shake, but 
Wissing made a higher score from standing position. Pyle was 
fifth with 373. 

Team and individual scores were as follows : 

Male (1870)— Staib, 384; Willhoite. 362; Givan, 388: Hodges, 
372 ; Vettiner, 364 ; 

Owensboro (1849) — Fears, 357; Smith, 363; Pyle, 373; 
Shake, 378 ; Wissing, 378 ; 

Ashland (1796)— Eaton, 364; Sammett. 359; Wright, 366; 
Pope, 352 ; Bullington, 355 ; 

Somerset (1719)— Hurst, 346; Goldenberg, 303; Nixon, 371; 
Stacey, 370; McPherson, 329; 

Bryan Station (1691) — T. Fee, 330; W. Zarrett, 356; S. Fee, 
339 ; King. 296 ; R. Zarrett, 370 ; 

Millersburg Military Institute (1672) — Kimbell, 327; Fortier, 
364 ; Larson, 337 ; Campbell, 315 ; Malone, 329 ; 

St. Joseph Prep (1214)— Massie, 200; Hines, 302; Glauber, 
252 ; Burnett, 207 ; Jefferson, 253 ; 

Western (634)— Huston, 89; Gritton, 115; Warford, 157; 
Taylor, 117 ; Mitchell, 156. 



0-1-0-0 ; Hobbs, Charles V., 3-19-6-0 ; Hobby, Bill, 2-9-3-0 ; 
Hodge, Fred, 3-3-1-0 ; Hoferer, Louis R., 6-9-0-0 ; Hoffeld, 
Bernie, 1-0-0-0 ; Hofstetter, Joe, 1-7-0-0 ; Holeman, Bill R., 
2-6-1-1 ; Holmes, Robert D., 0-0-6-0 ; Holt, Robert E.. 0-2-1-0 ; 
Holtzclaw, James R., 1-6-0-1 ; Hook, Burnley B., Jr., 3-20-1-0 ; 
Horton, Aldrich, 0-1-2-0 ; Horton, John, 2-13-1-1 ; Howard, 
Henry D., 2-0-0-1 ; Howell, Jerome, 1-5-3-1 ; Huber, Jerry, 
0-4-0-0; Hughes, Paul P., 0-4-0-0; Hughes, Robert E., 1-0-2-1; 
Huggins, Jim, 3-11-6-3 ; Hughes, Charles, 33-7-0-2 ; Huiet. F. 
"Whitey", 14-7-0-2; Hulsey, Donald, 0-3-1-1; Hummer, Irby, 
11-27-5-2 ; Hunley, Neil P., 8-8-1-0 ; Hurley, Robert, 2-4-2-0 ; 
Hutchinson, Jack T., 4-5-2-1 : Hutchens, Jim D., 1-2-2-2 ; Huter, 
Jim, 34-23-4-2 ; Hyatt, Bob, 19-17-11-7 ; Hyland. F. D., 0-1-0-0 ; 
Hynson, Fred R., 0-2-1-1 ; 

Idol, Billy Joe, 2-7-1-1; Inman, Briscoe, 40-18-3-0; Irwin. 
Charlie. 31-31-3-3 ; Isaacs, John F., 0-1-1-0 ; 

Jackson, Dennis M., 0-5-0-0 ; Jackson, Edward. 0-2-0-0 ; 
Jackson, Roy T., 0-3-0-1 ; Jahnigen, Robert, 0-1-0-0 ; James, 
Gene, 2-6-1-0 ; Jellison. Alvin C, 0-1-0-1 : Jenkins, James D., 
10-13-1-0; Jenkins, Kean, 19-33-4-4; Johnson, Gerry R., 0-1-0-0; 
Johnson. Jack D., 0-2-0-0; Johnson, James L.. 3-20-4-2; Johnson. 
James. M., 10-18-7-2; Johnson. Stanley W., Jr., 1-0-1-0; John- 
son, Vernon Lee. Jr.. 0-4-4-1 ; Johnson. Walter. 23-8-5-2 ; John- 
son. William Bernard, 8-16-3-2 ; Jones, Boyer, 23-8-3-2 ; Jones, 
Carson K., 0-10-5-1 ; Jones, Charles, Jr., 7-2-0-1 : Jones, Jimmy 
H.. 0-1-0-0; Jones, Paul. 7-4-1-1; Jones. Robert. 0-5-0-2; Jordan, 
A. Larry. 6-4-0-0 ; Jordan. Arthur, Jr., 4-24-7-2 ; Jordan, Ken, 
9-14-7-1 ; Junker, Edwin, 0-2-0-0 ; 

Kaler, Jerry Don, 0-1-0-0 ; Kappes, Keith R.. 0-0-1-1 ; 
Keeton. C. E.. 3-5-2-0 Kensler. Orville A., 1-11-1-3 ; Kercher, 
Norman, 5-17-2-3 ; Kerr, Warren R., 2-2-2-1 ; Key, Calvin, 
3-3-1-0; Kidd. Roy 10-16-4-1; Kilgore, Bob, 2-0-0-0; Kilgore, 
Roger, 0-1-0-0 ; Kilgore, Winston, 1-0-0-0 ; Kimmel, Jerry, 
29-34-5-4; King, Bob, 2-5-2-0; King, Dan, 16-36-3-0; King, 
James A., 22-33-7-0 ; King, Russell. 1-9-2-1 ; Kirkwood, Patrick, 
1-8-1-0 ; Kleinschmidt, Richard, 1-6-0-1 ; Knight, Bill, 27-28-6-0 ; 
Kremer, Joseph A., 0-5-4-2 ; Kuhl, Lawrence, 0-3-0-0 ; Kuster, 
William. 2-2-0-0 ; 

Lamb. Paul, 1-3-3-2 ; Lambert, Irvin, 1-9-2-0 ; Lambert. 
Kenneth L.. 0-1-0-0 ; Lance, Walter, 9-22-6-1 ; Landolt, Gene, 
6-23-4-2 ; Lanham, Durward, 3-2-2-0 ; Lankert, Norman E., 
2-11-1-0; Lashbrook, Harry Gene, 1-14-1-0; Laubheimer, Donald 
Travis. 12-6-4-2 ; Lawson, Leland, 7-0-1-2 ; Lawson, Rondall, 
0-1-1-0 ; Leahy, Patrick, 0-1-0-0 ; Lee, Arnold Joseph, 0-1-5-1 ; 
Lee, Charles J., 1-2-0-1 ; Lee, Douglas, 0-1-0-0 ; Lee, Robert L., 
18-17-2-1 ; Lee, William A., 1-1-0-0 ; LeQuire, Harold M., 4-7- 
0-1 ; Lewis Charles Odell, 0-0-1-0 ; Lewis, Donald, 0-1-0-0 ; 
Liles, Bill C, 0-12-2-0 ; Lindsey, Jack, 4-1-1-0 ; Little, Bernard, 
0-1-0-0 ; Little, James G., 1-0-0-0 ; Littlepage, Pryce B., 0-1-0-1 ; 
Lockard, Lee A., 0-1-0-0 ; Loney, Earl, 0-2-0-0 ; Long, Bill, 
6-15-2-1 ; Longenecker, David M., 9-13-4-2 ; Louden, Hubert C, 
8-10-3-0 ; Loudy, Kenneth, 8-6-0-0 ; Lowe, Eugene T.. 20-20-4-1 ; 
Lucas, Gene E., 23-15-6-1 ; Lusby, George, 0-3-2-1 ; Lyons, 
Charles S., 1-3-1-1 ; 

McAlister, Ronald D., 0-1-0-1 ; McAnelly, David F., 8-10- 
2-0 ; McBee, William K., 1-1-0-0 ; McBride, Donald R., 2-16-7-0 ; 
McCargo. Frank, 3-17-2-2 ; McCarter, Bobby, 3-3-0-0 ; McCauley, 
John E., 3-1-1-0 ; McClearn, Al, 0-5-1-1 ; McClellan. L. B.. Jr., 
7-21-6-4 ; McClure, William Scott, 39-16-1-1 ; McCormick, Lester 
E,, 0-1-1-0; McCowan, Connell, 6-12-5-0; McCoy, Hayse, 4-15-7-1; 
McDowell, Glenn D., 4-6-1-0 ; McGehee, Gordon. 2-14-0-1 ; Mc- 
Glasson, Galen. 0-5-1-0 ; McGlothlin, Leonard. 0-2-3-4 ; McGuire, 



STATE WINNERS IN GIRLS' TENNIS 




(Left to Right) : State tournament manager Margaret 
Sheegog; Cissy Gossman and Beazie Hobson of Atherton, state 
doubles championship team; (Inset) Pam Sallivan (Waggener), 
state singles champion. 



Jack. 0-0-2-0 ; McLean. Gordon. 1-2-0-0 ; McLeod, Robert N., 
3-9-0-0: McLin, Bruce. 6-9-1-0; McMillin, Larry L., 2-3-1-4- 
McMuUan, Cecil E., 0-2-0-0 : McPike, Ray S., Jr., 0-1-0-0 ; 

Macon, Allen Leon, 1-0-0-0 ; Maddox, Donald, 0-4-0-0 ; Madon, 
Robert Lee, 6-1-3-1 ; Mahan. Carle "Buddy", 26-27-2-1 ; Maines 
George E., 15-30-6-1 ; Mallory, David L., 1-2-3-1 ; Malone Donald 
E., 11-10-2-3: Manning, Conley, 2-3-1-0; Markert. Thomas. 
Jr.. 0-0-0-2 ; Marks, Edward W., 0-4-0-2 : Martin, Charlie, 0-2- 
2-0; Martin, Robert E., 2-1-2-2; Matthews, Dr., Lyie, 0-1-0-3; 
Mattingly Bernard, 0-8-0-2 ; Maxwell, Harry Edward, Jr.. 
0-0-1-0 ; Maxwell, James .. 1-0-0-0 ; May, E. B., Jr., 36-24-3-2 ; 
Maynard, Andrew J., 0-1-0-0 ; Mays, Ralph J., 15-8-1-2 ; Mayes, 
Edward. 4-14-5-0 : Meade. Foster "Sid". 47-23-6-8 ; Meadows. 
Marvin. 33-24-8-0 ; Meek, Walter, 0-2-0-0 ; Meiman, William 
A., 1-4-2-1 ; Melmige, Jim, 0-1-0-0 ; Meredith, Denny E. Jr., 
1-4-0-1 : Metcalf, Earl L., 16-25-6-0 : Meyer, Bud. 5-16-7-1 ; 
Middleton, Johnny, 1-2-0-2 ; Milbern, Daniel L., 3-6-0-1 ; Miles, 
Francis M.,0-3-2-1 ; Miller, Bob, 6-9-5-0 ; Miller, Jack. 2-14- 
0-0 : Miller. John Lee. 0-1-0-0 ; Miller. Kenneth H. 0-3-0-0 ; 
Miller. L. O., Jr., 3-7-2-0 ; Miller. Rex J.. 2-7-1-2 : Miller 
Rodney Don. 3-4-1-0; Miller. Roy J.. 0-11-3-1; Miller. Roy L.. 
2-7-2-8 ; Millerhaus. Bill. 0-4-0-1 : Mills. Gilbert James. 0-2-1-0 ; 
Miracle, Ed, 13-6-1-1: Moll, Francis B., 1-7-0-3; Monahan, Ed, 
1-4-2-0 : Montgomery. Gordon D.. 0-3-1-0 ; Moore, Arnold D.. 
0-0-1-0 : Moore, Hobert, 0-4-0-0 ; Moore, James E., 1-6-2-1 ; 
Moore, Robert, Jr., 1-19-4-4 ; Moore, Roy, Jr., 2-4-4-1 ; Morgan, 
Tom, 0-5-1-1 : Morgan, William W., 1-2-0-0 ; Morse, Richard 
K., 3-13-3-0; Moser, Emerson, 7-13-5-0; Moser, Rudy, 17-22-3-0; 
Moss, Julian. 2-15-2-0; Mouser, H. D., 3-9-0-2; Mudd, Ed, 13- 
20-3-10 : Mudd, Leon, 0-2-0-0 ; Mulligan, J. T., 4-4-4-0 ; Murphy, 
Donald, 2-2-0-1 ; Murrell. Allen Leslie, 7-33-8-6 : Musselman, 
Thomas, 0-1-1-0 ; Myers, Edward, B., 0-2-0-0 ; 

Napier, Walter, Jr., 0-1-0-0 : Nau, Bill, 16-11-4-1 : Neal. 
Gene. 21-21-8-1 ; Neal. James. 0-8-3-0 ; Nelson. Bernard L., 1-0- 
0-0 ; Nevil. Vernon E.. 0-0-0-3 ; Newman, Bill, 1-4-0-0 ; Newman, 
Luther G.. 7-8-2-0 ; Newsom, Lawrence. 2-10-2-2 ; Newsom, Mar- 
ley, 3-10-1-1 ; Newton, C. M., 18-11-2-0 ; Nie Allen F., 0-2-2-0 ; 
Nixon, James W., 11-19-5-0 ; Nord, Ed. 23-22-7-2 ; Nunn. Wesley 
L,. 0-0-1-0 ; 

Oldham. John H.. 0-10-1-2 : Oldham, Charles M., 0-4-1-0 ; 
Omer, Billy W., 5-5-0-1 ; O'Nan, Harold Lee, 2-5-1-2 ; Osborne, 
Homer L., 1-4-1-1; Osborne, Kenneth, 2-0-0-0; Overton, Frank, 
Jr„ 0-10-0-0 : Owens, Homer, 0-2-1-0 ; 

Pack, Ervin B., 0-0-0-1 ; Pack, James W.. 17-21-3-0 : 
Padgett, R. K.. 8-26-3-3 ; Palmer, Carl A., 1-0-1-0 : Palumbo, 
Arthur C, 0-1-0-0 : Pardue, Bob, 3-5-3-0 ; Park. J. M.. 0-25-8-4 ; 
Parker, Billy E., 21-13-2-0 ; Patrick, Ralph, 3-4-1-2 : Pearson. 
Bobby N.. 0-3-0-2 ; Patterson. Joe H.. 0-3-0-0 : Paulin. Al, 
2-2-0-0 : Payne, Gayle, 18-17-2-4 ; Payne, James L., 6-5-6-2 ; Peay, 
Curtis E., 12-21-5-3 ; Peden, Harlan, 1-12-2-0 ; Peeno, Harry R., 
0-0-2-1 ; Pelphrey, Jack, 0-3-1-0 ; Pennell, Donald G., 1-0-0-0 ; 
Penner, Merritt D., Jr., 0-1-0-0 ; Penrod, Joe B., 9-23-4-0 ; 
Pergrem, Nard, 32-11-0-0 ; Perkins, William E., 0-0-0-2 ; Perry, 
George B., 0-5-2-0 ; Perry. James E., 5-32-7-1 : Peters, Arthur 
0-0-1-0 ; Phelps, Mervil E., 0-1-0-0 ; Phelps, Ralph "Rudy", 
18-14-7-0 ; Phelps, Ray. 3-3-5-0 : Pike. Robert F., 7-13-3-1 ; 
Pogue, Ivan G., 7-16-3-2 ; Points, Charles, Jr., 0-2-1-0 ; Polly, 
Rex, 3-5-1-0 ; Porter, Albert Clark, 0-2-0-0 : Powell, Logan, 
3-11-7-3; Prather, Wilbur E., 0-1-0-0; Preece, Boyce, 0-2-0-0: 
Price. Charles. 2-2-2-1 ; Price, James E., 7-18-4-3 ; Prior, Lowell, 
2-7-2-2 : Pruden, Jim, 0-1-3-1 ; Pursifull, Cleophus, 19-14-1-0 ; 

Quillen, John T., 5-5-0-1 ; 

Radjunas, Stan, 3-7-1-1 ; Rainey, Jimmy, 20-15-7-2 ; Rakel, 
Bob, 1-0-0-0: Rail, Eugene, 0-0-1-0; Randolph, Don M., 3-12- 
0-1 : Rapier, Burl, 0-0-1-0 : Rapp, Bill, 9-7-3-1 ; Ratliff, Charles 
R. "Dick", 0-1-1-1 ; Rawlings, Charles, 1-2-1-0 ; Reece, Larry 
H., 0-2-0-0: Reed, Charles, R., 13-31-7-1: Reed, Gordon "Moe", 
10-19-2-1 ; Reed, William F., 0-4-0-3 ; Reinhardt, Jerry W., 0-2- 
0-0 : Reinhardt, Myron Stanley. 33-26-3-1 ; Renfro. John E., 
5-4-0-0 : Reschar, John V., 2-20-7-1 ; Rexroat, Jerry L., 19-12- 
6-3 ; Reynolds. Howard M., 0-2-0-0 ; Rhatigan, Alfred J., 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



ST. XAVIER'S CHAMPIONSHIP TENNIS TEAM 




(Left to Right) : State tournament manager Emmett Goran- 
flo; Mickey Schad, state singles cliampion; Jackie Cooper and 
Billy Spencer of the state championship doubles team. 



2-10-3-0: Rice, William. Jr., 0-0-0-4: Rice, Willard S., 0-12-2-1; 
Eichards. Dallas R., 1-0-0-0: Richardson. Charles E.. 7-5-2-1: 
Richal-dson, Joe M.. 2-1:5-2-1: Rickard, Bob, 3-4-1-3; Ricketts, 
Claude O., 13-27-4-1 : Rickman, Murrell, 0-0-6-0 : Riffe. James. 
6-10-2-0 ; Riggs, Morgan E., 0-0-1-0 ; Riggs. William T.. 0-1-1-1 ; 
Rison. Johnny B., 0-2-0-0; Ritter, Goebel, 17-.5-0-0 ; Rivlin, Jule, 
1-0-0-0 : Robbins. Burgess, 3-7-14-7 ; Roberts. Louis C. 0-1-0-0 ; 
Roberts, Ray M.. 0-1-0-0 ; Robinson. Don. 10-5-0-0 ; Roby. Joseph 
L., 2-14-3-2; Rodgers, David G., 9-11-4-1; Roeckers, Bernard, 
0-9-2-1 ; Rogers, Howard, 17-23-1-0 ; Roller. Otis C, 6-20-5-1 ; 
Rolph. Harold J., 12-6-0-0 ; Rose, Lee H., 1-0-0-1 ; Rose, Ronald, 
1-2-0-0 : Rose, Wally, 9-0-1-0 ; Rose, Walter, 0-0-1-0 ; Rothfuss, 
Richard, 1-6-3-0 : Rouse. Clyde L., 0-9-3-3 ; Rouse, W. L., Jr., 
0-1-1-0 : Roy. Charles D., 1-2-0-0 ; Rubarts. Leland G.. 2-27-5-2 ; 
Runyon. Tommy D., 0-1-0-0 : Rushing, Kenneth, 0-1-1-1 : Russell, 
Allen, 12-37-4-3 ; Russell, Eugene "Eudy", 2-7-0-1 ; Russell, Joe. 
21-21-9-4 ; 

St. Clair. Robebrt L., Jr., 14-15-1-1 ; Salyer, Gobel, 4-2-0-0 : 
Sams, Glenn, 1-2-3-0 ; Sanders, Mel, 14-24-5-4 ; Sang, Bob, 
6-3-0-0, Saturley, David, 0-1-0-0 ; Saucker, Sidney P., 0-1-1-0 ; 
Saylor, Needham, 1-0-0-0 ; Schad, James, O-S-O-O : Scharfenberger, 
Irv T., 0-7-1-0; Schlich, Paul E., 14-28-1-2; Schmitt, Paul E.. 
0-1-0-0 ; Schnebelt. Carl R., 2-1-0-0 ; Scott, Bill, 15-3-1-0 ; 
Scott. Clarence E., 1-2-0-0 ; Scott, Donald G., 0-0-1-0 ; Scott, 
Emmanuel H.. 0-1-1-1 ; Seale. John Daniel. 0-1-0-0 ; Seibert, 
Billy Ray. 0-0-1-0; Sellier. Ed, 1-0-0-0; Sellman, John B., 
0-0-0-1 ; Selvy, Curt, 31-24-3-2 ; Settle, Roy G., 10-33-3-1 ; Sexton. 
William L., 0-4-5-0; Shakelford. Roscoe, 12-5-0-0; Shaw, Earl, 
14-35-11-2; Shelton, Benny, 1-3-2-2; Sherrow, Curtis, 1-0-0-0; 
Sherrow, Winston G.. 3-10-3-1 ; Shewmaker. Wayne. 0-8-1-2 ; 
Showalter, John, 4-4-1-0; Shuck. Thomas, 7-15-6-2; Shumate, 
Fred R.. 1-1-0-0; Shumate. Robert, 1-.5-1-0; Siler. Clarence M. 
S-1-0-0 ; Simpson. Fred C, 1-3-1-0 ; Slucher. Kenneth W.. 1-9- 
1-3 : Small, William, Jr., 19-30-8-1 : Smith. David W., 8-25-5-2 ; 
Smith. Edgar J.. 5-15-6-2 : Smith. Eurnie H., Jr., 0-1-0-0 ; Smith, 
Wayne N., 37-29-2-3 : Smith, Willard N.. 40-21-1-4 ; Smith, 
William E.. 3-3-3-0; Sosh, LaRue. 10-1-0-0: Sosh, Nelson. 10-1- 
0-0 : South, William S.. 1-9-3-2 ; Spahr. David L., 0-10-4-2 ; 
Sparks, James T.. 0-5-1-0 : Spaulding, Stan. 2-2-0-0 ; Spencer, 
Irvin E., 16-36-12-0 : Spiceland, S. E.. 0-6-4-1 ; Spurlock, Ralph. 
2-2-0-0 : Stacy. Richie M.. 7-10-6-0 ; Stanfill. Robert S.. 7-2-2-3 ; 
Stearns, John, 0-5-2-1 : Steely, Stanley E., 8-2-0-0 ; Steenken, 
William R., 3-8-2-0 ; Stephens, Kenneth H., 3-4-2-0 ; Stephenson, 
Harry S., 15-14-1-1 ; Stephenson, Tommy H., 3-5-0-0 ; Stevens, 
Ale.\, 9-15-3-0 ; Stewart, Herbert T., 0-3-0-1 ; Stiff, Maurice, 
16-14-3-2 ; Stikeleather, Clyde, 2-10-2-0 ; Stines, Ray A., 7-10- 
6-0 ; Stinson, Charles L.. 1-6-2-0 ; Stith. Houston, 0-7-1-2 ; Stokes. 
Tommy G., 0-0-1-0: Stone, Doyle Clayton, 0-2-0-0: Strain. Richard 
P.. 0-13-2-2: Straub, Charles, Jr., 8-15-3-0: Strong, Arnett, 
27-19-4-1 : Stuart, Ronald, 0-2-0-0 ; Sturgill, Barkley 2-6-1-0 ; 
Suffill, Bob, 1-8-4-3 ; Sugg. Johnnie D., 2-3-0-1 ; Sullivan, Don 
C, 29-23-4-1 : Sumner, Harold C, 2-6-1-1 : Sutfin, Joe, 0-1-1-0 ; 
Sutton, Evans A., 0-3-1-0 ; 

Tackett, Harold, 1-3-1-2 : Tackett, Jay. 0-1-1-0 ; Tarlton, 
Thomas O., 0-2-0-0 ; Tarvin, Roger W., 2-1-1-0 ; Taylor. D. C, 
1-2-0-0 ; Taylor. Dennis H.. O-3-0-3 : Taylor, Edwin, 18-8-9-5 ; 
Taylor, Hal. 12-9-7-1 ;Taylor, Robert S., 6-12-2-1 ; Taylor, Rogers 
E., 17-31-10-1 : Tharpe, Robert, 0-7-1-1 ; Thoma, M. L., 15-22- 
3-2: Thomas, Charles, 3-15-7-0; Thomas, Frank M., 0-3-0-1; 
Thomas, Leo A.. 1-0-0-0 : Thompson. Arthur Lee, 4-1-2-1 : 
Thompson, Jack, 22-28-3-7 ; Thompson, Thomas A.. 3-0-0-0 : 
Timmons. Dwight C. 3-4-5-4 ; Tinsley, Earl, 2-10-1-1 ; Tinsley, 
Marion F.. 1-8-12-3; Todd. James L.. 0-8-0-0; Todd. Lonnie H. 
0-1-0-0; Toy, Eddie N., 2-4-0-0; Treas, Joe W., 0-6-3-1: Triplett, 
Herb, 2-5-0-1 ; Troutman, Doyle, 8-5-0-0 ; Trusty, Frank II, 
0-2-2-0; Tuck. Ochell L., 11-13-4-0; Tucker. Neal R.. 0-3-0-0; 
Tucker. Roscoe. Jr., 0-1-0-1 : Turner, Bruce, 0-0-1-0 ; Turner 
James W.. 1-3-0-1 ; 



Urlage. Richard, 1-0-0-0 : 

VanArsdall, Fred, 4-5-2-1; Vance, Earl G., 1-12-2-0; Van 
Meter, Kaye D., 0-6-2-0 ; Vannerson, Duke, 0-1-0-0 ; Vanover, 
Walter S., 1-3-0-0 ; VanSant, William E., 1-1-0-1 ; Van Winkle, 
Billy R., 2-10-6-0 ; VanSant. Jim. 3-5-0-0 ; Varble, William, 
9-24-3-1 ; Vermillion, Charles D., 6-10-2-0 ; Vescovi, Raymond 
B., 3-8-1-0: Vinson, Ray T., 11-8-3-1; Vipperman, Al , 0-2-0-0; 
Vowell, Darrell O., 0-1-0-0 ; 

Wagner, Marvin Ruby, 0-4-4-0 ; Waide, Harry D., 1-5-1-3 ; 
Walker, Paul R.. 9-8-2-1; Wallen. Howard W.. 5-11-1-1; Walls, 
Harry B., 0-6-1-2 ; Walters, Bob, 0-1-0-0 ; Walton, Roy, 2-4-2-1 ; 
Wanchic, Nicholas, 9-10-2-0 : Ward, Harold S.. 1-1-2-0 ; Ward, 
Jack, 9-24-5-1; Ward, Robert, 3-9-0-0; Warner, Marvin, 1-3-2-0; 
Warren, Kenneth A., 0-1-0-0 ; Wearren, Wade H.. 4-1-0-1 ; 
Weathers, Charles. Jr., 1-6-2-1 ; Weaver, Ray, 3-4-4-1 : Weaver, 
B. H., 6-30-4-0 ; Weber, John, 1-10-2-2 ; Webster, Paul, 0-1-2-1 ; 
Weisbrodt, Paul E.. 11-26-4-7; Wells. Milford. 21-14-6-1: West, 
Art F.. 4-4-1-1 ; Westerfield, Glenn, 6-16-1-2 ; Wettig, Clifford, 
0-1-0-0: Weyer, James. 0-1-0-0; Wheatley, Donald, 0-1-0-4; 
Whipple, Lloyd, 4-5-2-2 : White, David B.. 6-33-16-4 ; White. 
J. L., 3-4-4-0 : Wilham, Earl, 0-0-0-1 ; White, William Jason, 
0-4-0-0; Williams, Benny, 0-0-0-2; Williams, Bobby, 3-19-4-6; 
Williams. James. 3-3-1-1: Williams. Joe W.. 0-0-1-0; Williams, 
Paul Winston, 2-6-7-1 ; Williams. Roger. 24-17-0-0 ; Williams, 
Tom M., 0-2-0-0 ; Williams, H. Willie. 0-4-1-1 ; Willis, Donald A,. 
0-0-0-1 ; Willis, Robert A.. 0-2-0-0 ; Wilson, H. G., 3-4-2-1 ; 
Wilson, Jack R.. 16-18-3-2; Winchester, Roy L.. 33-42-7-4; 
Winfrey, Shelby, 30-26-3-2 ; Wingfield, Felix G.. 2-4-3-0 ; Wirtz, 
Howard A.. 4-9-3-0 : Wirtz, Leonard, 1-1-0-0 ; Wise, Billy V., 
19-21-0-2 ; Wise, Jack, 33-33-5-0 ; Withrow, Raymond, 2-10-2-0 : 
Withrow, Roy, 1-4-0-0 ; Wood, James W.. 0-5-0-1 ; Wood, H. 
Phillip, 0-1-0-0 : Woods, Gene, 0-24-4-3 ; Woodward, Billy, 0-0- 
2-0 ; Wright, Billy Joe, 2-6-0-2 ; Wright, H. W., Jr., 1-8-0-0 ; 
Wright, James Lloyd, 1-0-0-0 : Wright, John H., 0-1-0-0 ; Wright, 
Paul, 15-12-3-2 : Wrigley, Joseph, 1-3-0-0 ; 

Yancey, William T., 4-4-0-2 ; Yates, Howard C, 4-2-2-0 ; 
Yates, Virgil, 0-1-2-0 : Yeary, Bill, 2-3-2-3 : 

Zachem. Vincent, 27-11-4-1. 

Board Vacancy 

K.H.S.A.A. Director Robert P. Forsythe 
moved to Princeton, Kentucky, on July 1, and 
became Superintendent of Caldwell County 
Schools. Since Mr. Forsythe now holds an 
administrative position in Section 1, he is 
no longer eligible to represent Section 2, un- 
der the provisions of Article 4, Section 2-a, 
of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution. 

Mr. Forsythe's present term on the Board, 
had he remained a member, would have ex- 
pired on June 30, 1963. His replacement will 
therefore be elected to serve for the re- 
mainder of the 1962-63 K.H.S.A.A. year( July 
1-June 30). 

The Commissioner has notified principals 
in Section 2 that nominations for Board 
membership should be submitted to his of- 
fice not later than August 8. 

Medical Clinics 

A medical clinic sponsored .jointly by the 
U. K. Athletics Association, the K.H.S.A.A., 
and the Kentucky State Medical Association 
was scheduled to be held at the University 
of Kentucky on Saturday morning, August 
11. 

The K.H.S.A.A. and the Kentucky State 
Medical Association are also cooperating in 
conducting a series of additional medical 
clinics. The tentative dates and sites of these 
clinics are : Harlan, September 8 ; Bowling 
Green, September 15 ; Louisville, September 
22; Morehead, September 29; Murray, Octo- 
ber 6; Richmond, October 13. Additional in- 
formation concerning these clinics will be 
forthcoming. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



Page Eleven 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship K. H. S. A. A. 

Member Schools in Basketball, 1961-1962 



Adair County 

Adairville 

Allen County 

Alvaton 

Anderson County 

Annville Institute . 

Aquinas 



Ashland 

Atherton 

Attucks 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin Tracy 

Auxier 

Ballard Memorial 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bate 

Beaver Dam 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Benton 

Betsy Layne 

Bishop David 

Blaine 

Bloomfield 

Boone County 

Bourbon County _ 
Bowling Green __ 

Boyd County 

Bracken County _ 

Brossart 

Breathitt County 
Breckinridge Co. _ 
Breckinridge Tr. 

Bremen 

Bristow 

Brodhead 

Bryan Station 

Buckeye 

Buckhorn 

Bunche 

Burgin 



Bu 



nside 



Bush 

Butler 

Butler County 

Caldwell County 

Calhoun 

Calloway County 

Camargo 

Camp Dick Robinson 

Campbell County 

Campbellsville 

Caneyville 

Carlisle 

Carlisle County 

Carr Creek 

Carrollton 

Carter 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Centertown 

Central City 

Central 

Chandlers Chapel 

Charleston 

Christian County 

Clark County 

Clarkson 

Clay 

Clay County 

Clifty 

Clinton County 

College 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Covington Catholic _. 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden 

Cub Run 

Cuba 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County 

Cynthiana 

Dalton 



5 


7 


1 





5 


2 


12 


4 


11 


2 


16 


8 








26 


2 


6 




11 




11 




16 




10 




13 




5 




8 




8 




15 




14 




29 




9 




8 




18 




4 




19 




8 




6 




7 





4 





14 


5 


9 





15 


2 


10 


4 


13 


1 


7 





5 


4 


6 





7 


1 


17 


5 


14 


3 


8 


6 


13 


1 


13 


2 


5 


1 


4 


4 


7 


2 


9 





10 


4 


15 


2 


14 


3 


7 


6 


11 


10 


5 





9 


4 


8 


1 


23 


6 


5 





4 





3 


1 


5 


1 


4 





22 


2 


11 





11 


2 


9 


1 


3 


3 


11 


6 


23 


2 



OTHER SCHOOL 
OFFICIALS 

E I G I F I P 



CROWD 

G I F 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



County _ 
Springs 



Dixie H 
Dixon . 
Dorton 
Dotson 

Douglas: 

DeSales 

Drakesboro Com. 

Drakesboro Cons. 

Dunbar (Mayfield) __ 
Dunbar (Morganfield) 
Dunham 



(Henderson) 
(Lexington) 
(Murray) 



DuBois 

duPont Manual 

Durham 

Durrett 

Earlington 

East Benham 

East Main 

Eastern 

Edmonson County _ 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Cath. 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Estill County 

Eubank 

Evarts 

Ezel 

Fairdale 

Fairview 

Falmouth 

Fancy Farm 

Farmington 

Feds Creek 

Ferguson 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Flaherty 

Flat Gap 

Fleming County 

Fleming-Neon 

Fordsville 

Forkland 

Fort Knox 

Foundation 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin Simpson __. 

Frederick-Fraize 

Fredericktown 

Fredonia 

Fulton 

Fulton County 

Gallatin County 

Gamaliel 

Garrett 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Glendale 

Good Shepherd 

Graham 

Grant County 

Greensburg 

Greenup 



lie 



Guthr 

Hall 

Hancock County 
Han 



Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hazard 

Hazel Green (E. Bemstadt) 

Hazel Green 

Heath 

Hellier 

Henderson County 

Henderson 

Henderson Settlement 

Clay 

County 

County 



Henr 



Hickn 

High Street 

Highland 

Hindman 











OTHER 


SCHOOL 
















COACH 




OFFICIALS 






CROWD 






TEAM 


E 1 G 


F 


P 


E 1 G 


F 


>' 


E 


G 


F 


P 


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G 


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1 


47 


7 


1 





45 


8 


1 


1 


46 


6 


2 


7 


4 


2 


2 


58 


6 


1 





51 


10 


2 


1 


66 


6 


1 


8 


15 


3 


7 


49 


18 


1 





39 


24 


4 


1 


47 


17 


3 


4 


8 


5 





58 


14 


3 





50 


23 


2 


1 


56 


15 


5 


4 


9 








37 


10 








35 


17 





1 


36 


14 


1 


8 


15 


2 





29 


11 


4 


1 


21 


17 


7 





24 


17 


2 


3 


17 


7 


2 


63 


21 


3 





53 


26 


6 


2 


53 


29 


4 





18 


8 


16 


32 


19 


6 


6 


16 


21 


11 


14 


21 


17 


15 





14 


4 


1 


47 


10 


1 





35 


14 


7 


2 


41 


10 


6 


7 


12 


12 


3 


40 


16 


8 





32 


20 


10 


1 


32 


19 


11 


(1 


14 


2 


4 


34 


15 


1 





28 


18 


1 


3 


28 


19 


1 


5 


14 


1 


1 


27 


12 








20 


17 


2 


1 


19 


18 


3 


1 


14 


8 


1 


6 


16 


1 





5 


15 


3 


1 


2 


13 


8 


3 


15 


3 





35 


11 


2 





30 


17 


3 


1 


33 


17 





1 


15 


4 


1 


63 


10 


2 





55 


14 


7 


5 


67 


22 


2 


2 


6 


2 


2 


24 


7 


1 





20 


5 


3 


3 


23 


7 





5 


7 


2 


1 


25 


8 





« 


25 


10 








23 


13 


1 


6 


5 


1 


6 


25 


12 








23 


9 





5 


17 


14 


1 


9 


2 








36 


4 








33 


6 


1 





31 


9 


1 


5 


8 


1 


1 


41 


12 


1 


1 


38 


16 





1 


41 


12 


1 


9 


14 


1 


1 


42 


12 








34 


18 


3 





37 


17 


1 


4 


23 


2 





28 


21 








25 


23 


1 





24 


2b 





4 


8 


3 


2 


29 


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1 


23 


13 


1 





22 


13 


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51 


16 








50 


18 


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18 


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36 


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22 


29 





1 


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29 


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28 


17 


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1 


39 


6 





1 


35 


9 


1 





33 


11 


1 


2 


16 


2 


2 


28 


12 


2 





19 


20 





3 


22 


16 


1 


8 


7 








40 


5 








35 


9 


1 





37 


7 





7 


3 







33 


6 





2 


23 


10 


2 


6 


35 


6 





R 


2 







38 


5 


1 





29 


10 


5 





29 


11 


4 


9 


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2 


34 


17 


2 


1 


33 


15 


6 


1 


28 


20 


6 


4 


2 







33 


3 








32 


7 








31 


6 





8 


10 







33 


16 


1 





26 


22 


4 





29 


16 


6 


8 


6 







30 


2 


1 





29 


6 








21 


12 


1 


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6 







35 


8 


2 





38 


7 


1 





38 


6 


2 


3 


13 







54 


5 








47 


11 








46 


13 





2 


11 




4 


55 


6 


2 





41 


17 


2 


4 


28 


18 


12 


7 


18 







35 


19 


1 





24 


26 


3 


1 


26 


26 


7 


1 


7 







47 


6 








40 


13 





1 


38 


13 


3 





19 







26 


10 








21 


16 


1 





20 


19 


2 


7 


1 







38 


1 








34 


3 


2 





32 


5 


1 


2 


10 







59 


13 


1 





52 


18 


2 


1 


63 


lb 


4 


8 


6 




- 4 


47 


3 








42 


7 


1 





39 


9 


2 


2 


14 




1 


40 


9 


1 


1 


29 


17 


4 


1 


35 


15 


1 


9 


6 







27 


9 








24 


11 


1 





21 


13 





h 


17 




7 


42 


11 


1 





34 


17 


3 





33 


15 


5 


4 


13 







B4 


9 


3 





60 


14 


1 





60 


12 


3 


4 


5 




2 


31 


5 


1 





24 


13 


1 


1 


30 


4 


1 


7 


9 




2 


36 


10 


2 


1 


28 


14 


6 


3 


32 


9 


6 


4 


8 




1 


36 


7 





1 


28 


12 


2 


2 


30 


12 





K 


8 







35 


2 


2 





30 


9 








32 


7 





.1 


7 




1 


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9 








9 


11 


1 





11 


8 


2 


S 


9 







49 


5 








49 


6 








49 


b 





R 


14 




3 


45 


15 


1 





44 


12 


4 


1 


44 


11 


4 


3 


7 







33 


7 


1 





24 


15 


1 





26 


12 


3 


9 


4 




1 


31 


5 





1 


24 


11 


1 





24 


10 


2 





8 







30 


7 








29 


10 


1 





27 


12 


1 


2 


5 







38 


9 


2 





29 


18 


5 





28 


19 


1 


X 


1 







38 


1 








31 


3 


2 


1 


32 


7 





4 


7 




1 


34 


6 








31 


9 








33 


9 





1 


21 




2 


34 


18 





3 


25 


26 


1 


4 


32 


18 


3 


9 


10 







35 


4 








28 


9 


1 





27 


9 


3 


1 


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3 


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12 


1 


2 


28 


10 


3 


2 


29 


8 


4 


(I 


6 







32 


4 


1 





41 


6 


1 





37 


7 





1) 


5 




3 


42 


5 


1 


1 


40 


8 





1 


39 


9 





4 


12 




3 


37 


10 


2 





41 


12 


2 





41 


11 


2 


4 


9 




1 


27 


6 








23 


9 


2 





21 


12 


2 


.■? 


13 




3 


42 


9 








31 


9 


8 


5 


30 


lb 


6 


9 


20 







52 


18 








33 


35 


3 





38 


25 


7 





8 




1 


42 


6 


2 


1 


35 


9 


4 


5 


39 


9 


4 


3 


6 







60 


2 








49 


9 


1 





46 


12 


1 


2 


11 




3 


56 


3 


1 





41 


14 


4 


1 


41 


13 


3 


(1 


4 







30 


4 








23 


9 


1 


1 


26 


6 


3 


1 


5 




4 


22 


7 






16 


10 


5 





21 


4 


3 


7 


8 




3 


47 


12 


1 





37 


19 


2 


2 


43 


12 


3 


9 


9 


11 


6 


21 


22 


2 





12 


22 


9 


2 


15 


21 


5 


I 


11 







39 


14 





2 


34 


19 


3 





37 


13 


5 


8 


6 




1 


52 


5 


2 





49 


6 


2 


2 


49 


6 


3 


7 


7 





1 


30 


4 








26 


6 


1 


1 


28 


5 


2 


3 


12 








50 


4 








45 


9 


1 





44 


10 


1 


4 


6 


3 


1 


36 


5 


2 





28 


12 


1 


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33 


8 


1 


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14 


6 





60 


20 


2 





65 


21 


4 


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55 


25 


3 


(1 


3 








22 


1 








21 


2 








21 


2 





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12 


2 





62 


3 


1 





41 


12 


2 


1 


30 


14 


3 


fi 


5 


3 


1 


26 


7 


2 





19 


11 


5 





21 


10 


3 





7 


2 


4 


58 


1 





3 


49 


9 


1 


2 


49 


8 


1 


9 


14 


5 


4 


60 


8 


4 





43 


15 


3 


1 


42 


15 


3 


8 


1 


3 





40 


1 








37 


4 








35 


4 


3 


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7 








55 


1 








66 


5 








65 


6 





1 


16 


3 


3 


46 


10 


1 


2 


39 


19 


1 


2 


40 


41 





II 


11 


6 


6 


32 


14 


2 


4 


28 


14 


8 


2 


27 


21 


3 


V 


11 


1 


2 


27 


10 





2 


23 


12 


2 


2 


20 


14 


2 


4 


26 


4 





53 


24 


2 





41 


36 


2 





43 


34 


5 


2 


7 








32 


7 








30 


8 


1 





30 


9 






THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



Page Thirteen 



Lincoln 
Lincoln 
Lincoln 



Hiseville 

Hitchins 

Holmes 

Holy Cross 

Holy Family 

Holy Name 

Hopkinsville 

Horse Branch 

Howevalley 

Hughes Kirk 

Hustonville 

Inez 

Irvine 

Irvingi;on 

Jackson 

Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Johns Creek 

Junction City 

J. W. Million 

Kingdom Come 

Knott County 

Knox Central 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 

LaRue County 

Leatherwood 

Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County 

Leitchfield 

Leslie County 

Letcher 

Lewis County 

Lewisburg 

Lexington Catholic 

Liberty 

Lily 

Lincoln (Franklin) 

(Middlesboro) 

(Padueah) 

(Stanford) 

Institute 

Livermore 

Livingston Central 

Livingston 

Lloyd 

London 

Lone Jack 

Lone Oak 

Louisa 

Louisville Country-Day _ 

Lowes 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

Lynnvale 

Lyon County 

McCreary County 

McDowell 

McKee 

McKell 

McKinney 

Mackville 

Madison Central 

Madison 

Madisonville 

M. C. Napier 

Male 

Martin 

Mason 

Mason County 

Mayfield 

Maysville 

Maytown 

Meade County 

Meade Memorial 

Memorial (Hardyville) _. 
Memorial (Waynesburg) 

Menifee County 

Mercer County 

Metcalfe County 

Middleburg 

Middlesborough 

Millersburg Mili. Ins. 

Midway 

Montgomery County 

Monticello 

Morgan County 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg Central 

Mullins 

Munfordsville 

Murray College High 









OTHER 


SCHOOL 
















COACH 




OFFICIALS 






CROWD 






TEAM 


G 


f 


f 


E G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


F 1 


9 


5 





30 


6 








26 


7 


2 


1 


22 


9 


4 


13 


1 





42 


8 


3 





31 


12 


8 


2 


33 


18 


2 


17 








67 


24 





(1 


67 


30 


2 


2 


64 


27 


2 


13 


5 


2 


35 


14 


3 





23 


21 


5 


2 


27 


23 


1 


17 


3 


3 


55 


15 





1 


53 


16 


1 


1 


55 


15 


1 


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5 





87 


9 








73 


17 


6 





70 


14 


10 


5 


4 


1 


31 


7 


2 


1 


28 


9 


3 


1 


29 


9 


2 


8 


3 


3 


33 


9 


2 


2 


26 


14 


3 


3 


30 


9 


6 


8 


1 


2 


39 


3 


1 


1 


28 


13 


3 





30 


12 


2 


10 


3 


3 


36 


7 


5 





33 


7 


4 


5 


34 


10 


2 


15 


2 


3 


35 


9 


2 


1 


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13 


2 


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16 


2 


7 


1 





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2 


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9 


1 





44 


7 


1 


4 








32 


2 





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30 


2 








29 


3 





12 


1 


1 


42 


5 





u 


34 


11 


4 





34 


11 


2 


4 


1 





39 


5 





1 


32 


9 


2 


3 


24 


14 


3 


8 


3 





44 


9 


1 





43 


10 








42 


12 


1 


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2 


1 


43 


9 


1 


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10 





2 


42 


9 


3 


4 


1 


1 


36 


5 


1 


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31 


6 


4 


1 


36 


6 


4 


6 








51 


4 








42 


12 


1 





44 


10 


2 


7 


1 





16 


6 


1 





16 


6 


1 





16 


7 





11 


2 





21 


6 





1 


15 


15 


3 


1 


19 


12 


3 


9 


1 


2 


20 


13 








17 


16 


1 





17 


15 


1 


13 


1 





51 


9 


1 





42 


12 


4 


1 


46 


10 


3 


12 


2 


2 


32 


S 


1 


u 


21 


10 


1 


1 


28 


8 


3 


8 





2 


31 


4 





1 


25 


10 





1 


26 


9 


1 


15 


6 


11 


22 


8 


4 


9 


26 


11 


5 


1 


6 


14 


2 


3 


4 


1 


29 


6 


1 





21 


12 


2 


1 


24 


6 


6 


11 


1 


1 


34 


4 





u 


26 


11 


1 


1 


23 


14 


2 


5 


2 


4 


38 


7 





1 


32 


12 


1 


1 


33 


10 


2 


5 








41 


4 





u 


36 


11 


1 


1 


33 


9 


2 


12 





3 


42 


10 








37 


16 


3 





41 


12 


1 


7 


4 


2 


38 


7 


1 


1 


28 


14 


4 


1 


32 


10 


4 


5 


1 


5 


35 


5 





4 


25 


16 


3 


4 


6 


16 


1 


7 


1 


1 


41 


6 





U 


33 


11 


3 





38 


8 


1 


10 








37 


16 








32 


20 


1 





37 


15 


1 


10 





1 


41 


9 








40 


10 








39 


11 


1 


12 


3 


3 


39 


9 





u 


34 


8 


3 


4 


43 


10 





17 


2 


2 


40 


15 





1 


37 


16 


1 


2 


40 


16 





9 


2 


2 


32 


8 


1 


u 


26 


9 


6 


1 


28 


10 


1 


7 


3 





27 


7 


1 





23 


11 


2 





23 


10 


2 


10 


2 





16 


12 


1 





13 


13 


4 





14 


12 


4 


27 


3 


1 


28 


17 


2 


1 


15 


26 


3 


6 


23 


19 


3 


11 


6 


5 


29 


14 


2 


■i 


27 


13 


4 


2 


26 


12 


8 


12 


1 


1 


46 


12 








36 


21 


3 





39 


18 


3 


8 








40 


5 





u 


29 


16 


2 





36 


7 


1 


7 


3 





44 


5 


1 


u 


39 


13 








40 


10 


3 


11 


1 





53 


12 





u 


47 


19 


1 





50 


16 


1 


8 


1 


3 


48 


8 


1 


u 


42 


10 


3 


2 


40 


9 


6 


7 


1 





63 


3 








60 


8 








48 


10 





9 


4 





50 


6 








35 


17 


2 


2 


36 


16 


4 


6 


3 


1 


44 


6 








35 


12 


2 





39 


10 


1 


6 


1 





18 


3 


2 





18 


6 








18 


6 


1 


11 


4 


1 


50 


8 


1 





39 


15 


4 


1 


42 


12 


4 


7 


1 





37 


6 





() 


36 


8 








36 


7 


1 


25 


6 


1 


66 


20 


() 


u 


45 


35 


7 





47 


25 


14 


6 


1 


3 


44 


3 


2 





38 


9 


3 





38 


8 


3 


9 








37 


6 


1 





32 


12 


1 





33 


12 


1 


17 


3 


6 


32 


11 


4 


1 


23 


14 


8 


4 


26 


11 


7 


7 





2 


65 


8 





2 


63 


17 


2 


2 


60 


12 


1 


4 


1 


1 


59 


4 


1 





53 


7 





1 


48 


8 


2 


8 


3 





34 


3 





II 


28 


8 


1 





24 


8 


4 


10 


3 





47 


8 








36 


14 


4 


2 


42 


13 


1 


8 





n 


40 


5 








35 


10 


1 





32 


12 





15 


5 


7 


33 


11 


3 


u 


31 


16 


2 


1 


31 


16 


1 


15 








54 


9 








48 


14 


1 





50 


13 


1 


6 


2 





46 


5 


1 





42 


10 


1 





41 


10 


2 


10 


3 


3 


54 


11 


3 





38 


22 


8 


1 


64 


12 


1 


12 


1 


1 


21 


13 


2 


« 


16 


13 


3 





16 


13 


1 


11 


8 


15 


27 


13 





3 


21 


13 


5 


4 


16 


19 


5 


7 


3 


3 


43 


4 





(1 


60 


5 


2 





39 


7 


1 


4 





1 


29 


4 








25 


7 








16 


10 


8 


12 


1 


1 


38 


17 





() 


34 


20 


2 





34 


16 


2 


2 


1 





51 


4 


1 





47 


9 







49 


6 





10 


3 





46 


8 








44 


9 







46 


8 


1 


3 





3 


31 


6 








32 


2 







31 


4 


1 


7 


1 


1 


34 


12 








32 


11 




1 


35 


8 


1 


7 


2 


1 


60 


4 





u 


50 


11 







58 


5 





8 


1 





48 


7 





u 


48 


7 







47 


8 


1 


16 








32 


13 





u 


24 


20 







24 


18 


2 


6 


3 





27 


8 


2 





24 


12 







27 


6 


3 


15 


2 


3 


34 


13 


1 





29 


14 




1 


30 


12 


4 


7 


4 


3 


35 


9 








29 


11 







24 


14 


3 


9 


5 


2 


44 


9 


1 


() 


36 


13 




2 


36 


17 


1 


8 


1 





34 


4 








24 


12 




1 


26 


6 


7 


8 


6 


9 


32 


6 


2 





33 


5 




1 


24 


9 


4 


10 


2 


2 


30 


7 


3 





26 


11 




2 


27 


12 


6 


10 


3 


1 


36 


10 


2 





35 


13 








32 


14 


2 


16 


3 


1 


37 


15 


2 


u 


37 


6 


12 





38 


11 


4 


12 


3 


9 


23 


14 


3 


6 


16 


17 


3 


11 


16 


11 


11 


9 


1 


1 


35 


10 





(1 


28 


15 


2 





30 


11 





2 








35 


2 








35 


2 








36 


2 





8 








43 


6 





u 


35 


11 


3 





36 


9 





9 


2 


2 


50 


7 


2 


(1 


46 


7 


3 


4 


48 


8 


1 


5 


4 


2 


64 


2 


4 


1 


47 


14 


5 


6 


53 


14 


4 


2 


1 


1 


24 


3 





u 


24 


3 








21 


4 


1 


8 





1 


32 


7 


3 





28 


9 


6 


3 


32 


11 


2 


3 


1 





25 


4 





u 


23 


5 








24 


3 


1 



Pay? Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



Murray 

Nancy 

Nebo 

Newport Catholic _ 

Newport 

Nicholas County __ 
North Marshall __ _ 
North Middletown 

North Warren 

Oil Springs 

Old Ky. Home 

Oldham County 

Olive Hill 

stead 



On 



County 

Owensboro Catholic 

Owensboro 

Owingsville 

Owsley County 

Paducah Tilghman _ 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Parksville 

P. L. Dunbar 

Pendleton Mem. 

Perryville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Pine Knot 

Pine Mountain 



■ille 



ant View _ 
Ridge 

Poplar Creek 

Powell County _ 
Prestonsburg 



chard 



Providence 

Pulaski County 

Raceland 

Red Bird 

Reidland 

Richardsville __ 

Rineyville 

Ri 



Rose 



ckhold 

aid (Harlan) 

nwald (Madisonville) 
Rosen wald ( Nicholas ville) 
Rosen wald (Providence) _ 

Rowan County 

Russell County 

Russell 

Russellville 

Sacramento 

St. Agatha 

St. Agnes 

St. Aloysius 

St. Augustine 

St. Benedict 

St. Catherines 

St. Charles 

St. Fr; 



Henry 

St. Joseph (Bowling Green) __. 
St. Joseph Prep. (Bardstown) 

St. Mary's Academy 

St. Patrick's 

St. Thomas 

St. Vincent Acad. 

St. Xavier 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 

Scott County 

Scotts ville 

Sebree 

Sedalia 



Sharpsburg 



Shelby County 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove 

Simon Kenton 

Slaughters 

Somerset 

Sonora 

South Hopkins ___ 
South Marshall ___ 
South Portsmouth 

Southern 

Springfield 



COACH 

E I G I F I 



OTHER 


SCHOOL 










JFFICIALS 






CROWD 


K 


G 


!•' 


p 


E 


G 


F 


34 


2 





1 


24 


10 


1 


53 


3 








48 


8 


1 


34 


24 


1 





20 


29 


7 


67 


le 





1 


44 


20 


6 


51 


37 


2 


1 


47 


38 


5 


56 


5 


3 





51 


8 


5 


34 


11 


1 


u 


28 


9 


7 


47 


8 








47 


7 


1 


34 


14 








23 


20 


4 


45 


7 


1 


u 


39 


10 


3 


22 


11 


1 





25 


9 


1 


28 


7 


1 





26 


8 


5 


53 


6 








49 


7 


2 


29 


4 








24 


8 


2 


42 


6 








37 


12 





44 


9 








30 


25 


1 


52 


12 


1 





38 


21 


3 


67 


4 


u 


1 


58 


13 


1 


45 


14 








42 


15 


2 


27 


2 








19 


9 


2 


45 


8 


2 


2 


39 


10 


5 


32 


10 








25 


6 





37 


1 








31 


6 





43 


6 








40 


9 





35 


6 








27 


11 


2 


38 


6 








30 


11 


3 


29 


17 


1 


1 


22 


22 


3 


44 


22 








34 


30 


2 


38 


7 


2 


3 


41 


9 





37 


7 





11 


30 


9 


3 


36 


3 








28 


9 


1 


53 


4 








49 


7 





14 


2 





11 


13 


2 


1 


46 


4 


1 





37 


12 


3 


40 


4 








30 


11 


3 


46 


9 


1 





39 


12 


3 


44 


4 





2 


32 


11 


2 


35 


8 


1 





30 


12 


1 


36 


1 








32 


5 





45 


12 








33 


22 


2 


31 


11 


1 


1 


26 


15 


2 


43 


24 


4 


1 


33 


24 


13 


37 


6 


5 





34 


10 


1 


58 


3 


1 





54 


9 





65 


7 








41 


18 


3 


34 


4 








21 


15 


2 


41 


8 








32 


12 


3 


11 


6 








10 


7 





44 


6 


1 





38 


10 


3 


32 


5 








28 


9 





31 


23 








28 


26 





14 


8 








12 


8 


1 


26 


20 


1 


1 


23 


23 


3 


44 


6 


1 





26 


15 





35 


12 


1 


1 


39 


8 


2 


62 


8 


1 





48 


14 





32 


7 








29 


10 


1 


41 


21 








31 


21 


6 


48 


4 





u 


44 


6 


2 


27 


10 


1 





20 


11 


6 


21 


2 








19 


4 





36 


7 





(1 


28 


14 


1 


36 


4 








31 


8 


1 


30 


10 





1 


36 


11 


2 


45 


4 








45 


6 





39 


8 








31 


12 





45 


34 





1 


38 


36 


4 


38 


6 








32 


11 


2 


24 


7 








19 


11 


3 


49 


6 


1 


2 


43 


12 


1 


49 


9 








42 


14 


1 


36 


23 


1 





36 


25 





36 


10 








31 


14 


2 


59 


12 





1 


41 


25 


4 


43 


11 


1 


1 


31 


19 


2 


44 


12 


2 





38 


16 


4 


61 


7 


1 





58 


8 


2 


47 


7 








36 


15 


3 


41 


15 


2 





27 


23 


7 


39 


9 


2 


1 


20 


19 


5 


60 


4 








44 


11 





40 


8 


1 





33 


16 





29 


12 


1 





25 


20 





30 


6 


1 


3 


22 


11 


2 


41 


9 


2 





34 


16 


2 


38 


2 





(1 


36 


5 





45 


3 








40 


7 





59 


28 





1 


43 


37 


7 


69 


20 


1 





51 


34 


5 


48 


15 





1 


29 


28 


6 


49 


11 





(1 


43 


11 


6 


49 


7 








35 


22 


3 


50 


16 


1 


II 


35 


21 


6 


30 


6 








25 


10 





53 


8 





2 


45 


15 


2 


59 


9 








45 


24 





24 


13 


1 





19 


23 






7 


2 


7 


2 


22 


15 


15 


3 


36 


2 


11 


5 


14 





11 





20 


3 


8 


2 


8 


1 


9 


1 


10 





7 


1 


13 


6 


20 


2 


9 


5 


2 


2 


12 


4 


6 





7 


2 


16 





2 





11 


1 


11 





12 


3 


20 


1 


27 


2 


14 


1 


16 


2 


8 


4 


10 





4 


2 


14 


6 


10 


2 


10 


2 


14 


1 


9 


2 


7 


1 


17 


1 


13 


4 


24 


13 


12 


2 


10 


2 


15 





15 


9 


10 


4 


8 





14 


6 


7 


1 


23 


2 


9 


2 


26 


5 


12 


1 


9 


3 


13 


1 


7 


1 


19 


5 


7 


1 


12 


6 


4 





15 


1 


8 


2 


11 


2 


4 





9 





35 


7 


10 


7 


9 


3 


8 


2 


13 


2 


31 


2 


14 


1 


18 


1 


15 


7 


11 


7 


11 


3 


14 


4 


22 


7 


14 


6 


6 





9 


1 


21 


2 


10 


1 


12 


1 


6 





11 


3 


33 


7 


28 


7 


21 


10 


8 


6 


20 





19 


3 


10 


1 


10 


3 


20 





18 


1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



Page Fifteen 



Stanford 

Sturgis 

Symsonia 

Taylor County 

Taylorsville 

Temple Hill 

Todd County 

Todd County Train. 

Tollesboro 

Tompkinsville 

Trigg County 

Trimble County 

Trinity 

Tyner 

University 

Valley 

Van Lear 

Versailles 



Virgie 

Waggener 

Wallins 

Walton-Verona 

Warfield 

Warren County 

Wayland 

Wayne County 

West Main 

Western (Owensboro) 

Western (Paris) 

Western (Sinai) 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

William Grant 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Willisburg 

Wingo 

Woodbine 

Wolf County 

Wurtland 











OTHER 


SCHOOL 
















COjiCH 




OFFICIALS 




CROWD 






TEAM 


E 1 G 


F 


P 


E 1 G 1 F 1 P 


E 


G 


F 


P 


E 


G 


t' 1 


S9 


6 


2 


1 


38 


7 


1 





37 


7 


1 


3 


31 


8 


8 


41 


7 


2 





41 


9 








32 


17 


2 





34 


15 




V) 


8 


1 


1 


33 


3 








31 


8 


2 





30 


9 




48 


7 








44 


7 








40 


12 


1 


2 


42 


10 




V^ 


6 


2 





32 


4 





1 


32 


10 


1 





37 


6 




?.1 


7 


1 


7 


27 


K 


1 





22 


13 


1 





23 


11 




19 


11 


4 


2 


25 


10 








21 


12 


1 


2 


22 


14 





SI 


13 








31 


13 








25 


17 


?. 





22 


16 


5 


S4 


13 


1 





37 


10 


1 




35 


9 


3 


1 


36 


10 


1 


18 


5 


1 





32 


6 







28 


7 


3 


1 


25 


10 


2 


15 


3 


1 


3 


32 


10 








28 


13 


1 





31 


9 


2 


45 


6 


2 





44 


8 








32 


19 


2 





35 


16 


2 


^A 


16 


7 


3 


34 


13 


3 





21 


11 


10 


8 


311 


17 


3 


SO 


6 


1 





28 


7 








30 


5 








23 


9 


2 


41 


10 


1 





36 


13 


1 





37 


13 








31 


9 


6 


S7 


15 


2 





44 


9 








36 


17 


2 





33 


18 


3 


M 


11 








32 


5 





1 


23 


12 


3 





23 


13 


2 


S7 


9 


2 





45 


3 








42 


4 


2 





44 


4 





U 


11 


3 


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SHALL WE ELIMINATE THE VARSITY? 

Recently a magazine published an article 
with the title "Kids and Athletics." No auth- 
or was named. 

The substance of the article can be stated 
simply — we paraphase: "The way to get our 
youth physically fit is to have physical activ- 
ity for all and not just a few engaged in var- 
sity competition." Later in the article the fol- 
lowing statement appears, "The most deadly 
opponent of physical fitness is the varsity 
team." 

The author does what is done by so many 
who write about their ideas, i.e., stating a 
premise from which he draws a conclusion 
without investigating if the premise is sound. 

If the way to get a high percent of youth 
physically fit is to abandon all varsity ath- 
letics we would agree to proceed along that 
plan. But the premise is not sound and no 
proof or experiment can be shown that the 
author's premise is correct. From studies 
made, nation wide; from forty years of ex- 
perience with athletic activity, we are con- 
vinced that the opposite is true. 

First, to say that few pupils receive the 
benefits of varsity competition is not true. 
Of course, it depends upon your ideas of w'hat 
is a "few." Studies conducted by the PIAA 
and other state associations prove that one- 
third of the enrollment participate in varsity 



competition. By our standards that is not a 
few. 

It means in PIAA schools alone over 125, 
000 boys are receiving benefits. And if we 
add to this number the many participating in 
other amateur programs, such as the Ameri- 
can Legion Junior Baseball organization, we 
cannot convince ourselves that it is a few 
who receive physical benefits. 

Second, suppose we eliminated all varsity 
competition. Would others not participating 
suddenly decide athletics was "for them"? 
We would not argue that all should not par- 
ticipate, that is the ideal for which we strive. 
Why are there not more participants in var- 
sity football? Is it because we have varsity 
football? 

All of us know modern living does not 
furnish incentives for physical activity. We 
are not walking enough because we have the 
automobile. We transport pupils to and from 
school. We encourage a life of lack of physical 
activity by indulging our youth with modem 
conveniences. To say that more pupils would 
engage in physical activity if we decreased 
the incentives of the varsity program does 
not make sense. 

If we wamt youth and adults to walk more, 
execise more, we know the answer, and it will 
not be by eliminating varsity football. 

We are quite certain that Americans are 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1962 



OUR THANKS 

TO THE COUNTY AND 

INDEPENDENT SCHOOL SYSTEMS 

AND THE COLLEGES 

AND INDIVIDUAL SCHOOLS 

WHICH HAVE CHOSEN US TO HANDLE 

THEIR STUDENT AND ATHLETIC 

ACCIDENT PROGRAMS FOR 1962-63 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



^/te KiAx^deH, Go^np,amf> 



W. E. KINGSLEY 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 2-8522 



not going to adopt voluntarily a program of 
mass calisthenics. Even the armed services 
with a compulsory program found it neces- 
sary to install a gigantic program of compet- 
itive games. 

It is wishful thinking to suppose we will 
do as some countries have done. Our way of 
life, our method of living is different. 

That "The varsity team is an opponent 
of physical fitness" is a false assumption and 
we all know it. In our frustration we must 
find a scape goat just as we sougtht one for 
our failure to orbit the first "Sputnik." 

The most physically fit in any school will 
be found on the varsity teams. They are the 
ones with ambition and energy enough to ex- 
ercise physically. We would welcome an in- 
vestigation of who, in any school, would meet 
the standards of physical fitness. Who can do 
the most "push-ups" or "pull-ups" in the 
sdhool ? Are they the members of the varsity 
teams or are they the youth content to dis- 
regard the challenge of physical exertion ? 

What we need is to seek some way in 
which we can encourage all youth to seek the 
standards of physical fitness attained by the 
varsity. We need more varsity teams, not 
less. We need in football more varsity, more 



junior varsity, more weight class teams. And 
we need to challenge them to participate 
throug'h competition. 

To say that more do not participate be- 
cause they do not have the opportunity is 
making too easy an answer. There are few 
coaches who would not welcome with open 
arms more candidates. 

In some schools coaches are begging for 
participants. There is opportunity for those 
willing to set aside a life of ease for a life of 
physical activity. We would be interested in 
a school adopting a program of no varsity 
teams to find out if more boys would partici- 
pate in the vigorous disciplines demanded by 
the varsity. 

Just What is needed to make our youth 
physically fit? Personnel and facilities — yes. 
But that is not the whole answer. Why not 
expand the program which has been success- 
ful? Eliminate varsity athletics in Pennsyl- 
vania and 200,000 youths will join the rank 
of the unfit. Modern life with its attractions 
for physical ease is the greatest competition 
we have to a physical fitness program. Let us 
expand the only program we have to 
encourage physical activity, the varsity. 

— ^the Pa'thlete 



SUTCUfH IS REAPy 

with complete football, basketball 
and athletic equiptnent for the fall season 



Now we can give you immediate delivery. No Delay ! No Waiting ! 
Stock merchandise can be shipped on the very day your order is 
received. 




QUALITY BRANDS 

Our stocks this year are the same top 
quality for which Sutcliffe is now well 
known — nationally^distributed, nationally- 
advertised preferred quality brands. 



W\ 



SUTCLIFFE'S SERVICE 

For on-the-spot service, the Sutcliffe School representative will 
contact you, as usual, during the year. Bill Shannon, 122 Yancey 
Drive, So. Ft. Mitchell, will cover eastern Kentucky; Charles 
"Chuck" Shuster, Horse Cave, will travel western Kentucky; and 
Al Lecomte, 2502 Cottonwood Drive, Louisville, will cover the 
Louisville area. 

Write us about your needs. Remember we give one-day service. 



SUTCLIFFE CATALOGUE— If you have not received your copy of 
our 1962 Fall Catalog by September 10, please drop us a card and we 
shall send you one promptly. You will be quick to appreciate the top- 
flight athletic items from which you may select your Fall equipment. 




THE Sutcliffe CO, 

INCORPORATED 

225 so. FOURTH ST., LOUISVILLE, KY. 



-^^T ^YSTO^ ^ 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., INC. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



U. OF K. COACHING CLINIC 

We hope you visited our display at the Coliseum during the University 
of Kentucky Coaching- Clinic in Lexington on August 8-11, 1962. 

If you failed to place your order at that time we are still able to take care 
of any football orders in the most satisfactory manner, as our stock of 
football equipment is larger and more complete than ever. 

On special-made merchandise we feel confident that we can have the mer- 
chandise in your possession in plenty of time for any requirement. 

Any sihipment made during the months of August or September will carry 
October 1, 1962 dating. 

On any of your incidental supplies check upon the following : 

PV)otball tees, table pumps, electric inflators, shoulder pad laces, 
pant laces, shoe laces, plastic face guards, rubber teeth guards or 
protectors, helmet paint for leather or plastic helmets, all types of 
chin straps, aluminum cleats, rubber cleats, dry stag line white for 
marking football fields, blocking dummies, line markers, lines- 
men's chains, goal line markers, sideline markers, football goal 
posts, sideline capes, Fair Play basketball scoreboards, portable 
'bleachers, dry or wet line markers. Whirlpool Baths, Vibra Whirl 
Baths by Cramer, football posters, first-aid kits, Cramer's first-aid 
supplies, a complete line of practice jerseys, sweat socks, athletic 
supporters, surgical scissors, etc. 

Our representative Ed Hendley is now living in the city of Louisville. His 
telephone number is 451-0576. A card to him at Box 20112, Hikes Point 
Station, Louisville 20, Kentucky will have him come running. 

We will be looking forward to seeing you at various times throughout the 
year. Look for our salesmen to call. 





High School Afhlefe 

K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 






Edgar McNabb, Kentucky's voting delegate on the National Federation Football Committee, conducted a school 
for football officials in Lexington on August 10-11. The officials who attended the school will return to their 
respective areas and conduct similar meetings and clinics throughout the forthcomnig football sesaon. Area rep- 
resentatives, pictured above, are: (Left to Kight) Front Row — Bernard Johnson Lexington; Bill Womack, Hen- 
derson; Gene Cathey, Murray; Kean Jenkins, Elizabeth town. Second Row — Sam Gruneisen, Louisville; Joe Russell, 
RnsseHville; Bill Gammon, Ashland; Charles Black Barbourville. Third Row — School Director Edgar McNabb, 
South Fort Mitchell; Gene Neal Batavia, Ohio; Ed Nord, Louisville. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

SEPTEMBER - 13B2 




NATIONAL 
ALLIANCE 



/^. 



1L ■:{ Offside or viola- 
\ll tion of free-kick 



FOOTBALL OFFICIALS' SIGNALS 



J Foul Signals 1 to 1 6"|, 

~ ft" 



^rl ' fr) 



16 © 



rules 



@ 2 



^ 



L4 



(ife*/ 



Illegal position Illegal motion or shift 

or procedure Both hands for illegal 

Illegal forward shift 

handing 



y Delay of game 
Crawling 
Encroachment 




Pushing, 

helping runner or 
interlocked interference 



r.-^. 



15 

-A 



Illegally kicking 
or batting a 
loose ball 



■j-v. Ball is dead 



\\,, - 

\ ' Mt' ' For touchback 
\^yL wave sidewise 

/K ' 

I 




Ball ' 
\ ready for play 

-~^> Incomplete forward . ,, 

pass — penalty declined — ) '' 
J ' no play or no score \ 

First down 
For first touching ^^^^7^ V% 

of a kick, point to X^^xC^ M9 



spot 




Ineligible 
receiver down 
field on pass 




Interference with 
fair catch or 
forward pass 



nXy^ 1 iSw Time out 

^ Clock ^JU^^^ ■■ 

\_ -^ Officials time out— follows 
signal D 

M 

Illegal forward 
pass 




Grasping opponents face 
protector 





Intentional 
grounding 



Unsportsmanlike conduct 
Delay start of half 
Illegal participation 

lO (^ 

\\ /\ 

Illegal use of \ v.-A"'^* 
hand or arm ^-^^'L 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXV— NO. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1962 



1.00 Per Year 



Joint Meeting 

Late in July the Commissioner received a letter 
from Mr. E. J. "Paxton, Jr., Chairman of the Kentucky 
Commission on Public Education!, suggesting a joint 
meeting of his commission and the K.H.S.A.A. Board 
of Control. In his letter Mr. Paxton said: "During it's 
two years of studies the Kentucky Commission on 
Public Education has heard a great deal of discussion 
on the subject of interference by extra-curricular ac- 
tivities with normal classroom schedules in the public 
schools. The impression received by the public, I am 
afraid, is that athletics are principally to blame for 
these interruptions. We members of the commission 
realize that this is not the case. Our next formal re- 
port will deal with this important subject to some 
extent and, before beginning to draft it, we would 
like very much to be able to meet with you and your 
executive committee or your board of directors to 
discuss this subject." 

The Commissioner accepted the invitation for the 
Board of Control, and the joint meeting of the two 
groups was held in Frankfort on August 16. Present 
were Chairman Paxton and five other members of 
the Commission on Public Education, President K. G. 
Gillaspie and five other members of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Boaixl of Control, the Commissioner, the Assistant 
Commissioner and members of the press. 

Mr. Paxton opened the meeting by explaining the 
organization of his commission, and outlining its pur- 
pose. He said that it was not the intention of his 
group to single out athletics as the only offender in 
the study of possible overemphasis of extra-curricular 
activities, and that he would welcome comments and 
suggestions from those present. 

One member of the commission stated that one 
school had scheduled as many as three games on a 
mid-week niig'ht, this being an example of overempha- 
sis. No person present defended this practice, al- 
though it was believed that such scheduling was the 
exception rather than the rule. 

One member of the commission asked about the 
percentage of coaches in the 1962 delegate assembly 
of the K.H.S.A.A. which had defeated Board pro- 
posals to limit the number of mid-week basketball 
games and to lower the season limit of basketball 
games. The Commissioner stated that approximately 
one half of the delegates were coaches. He further 
stated that the proposals mentioned were passed by 
a majority vote of those present but that a two- 
thirds majority vote was necessary for a change in 
the Association by-laws; also that it was his ob- 
servation that as many administrators as coaches 
were voting against the proposals. The Commissioner 
thought that many administrators voted against the 
cut in games because they felt that it would work a 
hardship in their districts. In some eases, he explain- 
ed, colleges use up available weekend nights, or gym- 
nasiums used jointly by a number of schools are 
hard to reserve. Then, some schools maintain only 



the sport of basketball and their teams play it for a 
longer season. 

The Commissioner was asked by President Gillas- 
pie to make the opening statement for the Board of 
Control. He gave a short history of the K.H.S.A.A., 
explaining the reason for its being organized and 
pointed out certain improvements which had taken 
place through the years. He stated that, in his 
opinion, underemphasis rather than overemphasis is 
the problem with athletics in the schools. He said: 
'"If there is educational value in athletics — and I 
believe there is — ^we ought to make an effort to ex- 
tend it to more children." He also discussed the aver- 
age school marks made by athletes and non-athletes, 
and the holding power of athletics as it relates to 
school drop-outs. 

Members of the Board of Control and the Assis- 
tant Commissioner spoke on the following topics: (1) 
Many changes under way toward the reduction of 
mid-week games and the total number of games since 
the commission report was made, (2) cooperation of 
principals and coaches in decreasing the number of 
basketball games, (3) comparison of athletes and non- 
athletes in school discipline problems, (4) survey of 
pupil activities on non-game mid-week nights, (5) 
poor supervision of after-school pep meetings, (6) 
objectives of the calendar committee in solving spring 
sports problems. 

The Commissioner stated that the Board of Con- 
trol wamts to work with the Commission on Public 
Education in helping to see to it that athletics keeps 
its proper place in education, but that he did not be- 
lieve that state legislation was the answer. He thought 
that possible overemphasis problems could be solved 
by K.H.S.A.A. and State Department of Education 
regulations, and by the administrators and Boards of 
Education themselves at the local level. 

Chairman Paxton thanked the representatives of 
the K.H.S.A.A. for aittending the joint meetir.g. In a 
note written to the Commissioner a few days after 
the meeting he said: "Our meeting vrith you and the 
members of your Board of Control at Franiifort on 
August 16 was most helpful to all the members of 
the Commission." 



1962-63 Insurance Subsidy 

As reported in the Board of Control meeting 
minutes Which appear in this issue of the ATHLETE, 
the Board voted in its July meeting that the insurance 
subsidy for each K.H.S.A.A. member school in 1962- 
63 shall be the basic amount of $30.00, with an addi- 
tional subsidy of $50.00 for schools maintaining foot- 
ball. School administrators wishing to take advantage 
of the subsidy may write to the State Office for re- 
imbursement forms. Some of hte companies with 
which Kentucky schools place their insurance busi- 
ness give the schools credit for the amounts due and 
bill the Association for these amounts. The reim- 
bursement plan and the credit plan are both satis- 
factory. 



Page Two THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1962 

Septembar, 1962 VOL. XXV— NO. 2 The Cavana Award 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. ^^^^H^^^BIB I I 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD ^^^MHtBWHH .iJ 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD ^^^^HHSiSHw il 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-6.3). Georgetown 

Vice-President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64). Harlan ^^^x 

Directors — Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66). Horse Cave; Sherman ^^K^lil ~ TKi5#l 

Gish (1962-63), Greenville; Preston Holland (1961-65), Murray; ^^^^ JM. mBtWl 

Don R. Rawlings (1961-65), Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1962- 
66), Louisville; Oran C. Teater (1960-64), Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1,00 Per Year 



Jt'iom the Commissionei s CJffice 

New Board Member 

Sherman Gish, Superintendent of Muhlenberg- 
County Schools, has been elected to membership on 
the K.H.S,A.A. Board of Control. In balloting which 
ended on August 29, Mr. Gish defeated five other 
candidates who were running for election to repre- 
sent Section 2. They were: Supt. 0. J. Alhn of the 
Breckinridge County Schools, Coach Bowman Daven- 
port of the Clarkson High School, Prin. W. M. "Moss" ' 
Martin of the Beaver Dam Elementary School, Ass't 
Prin. Lawrence L. McGinnis of the Owensboro High 
School, and Prin. W. P. Wheeler of the Daviess County 
High School. 

Mr. Gish will serve until next June 30. He will 
fill out the unexpired term of Supt. Robert P. For- 
sythe of the Caldwell County Schools, who moved out 
of the Section on July 1. An article concerning Mr. 
Gish will appear in the October issue of the 
ATHLETE. 

Use of Registered Officials 

A list of registered football officials appears in 
this issue of the ATHLETE. Principals and coaches 
should study the current list to determine whether or 
not all officials with whom contracts have been sign- 
ed have registered this fall. Supplementary lists of 
officials will appear in subsequent issues of the maga- 
zine. By-Law 22 provides that member schools shall 
use registered officials in all football and basketball 
games, and that failure to comply with this regu- 
lation makes the home school liable for suspension. 
If there is any question about registration, the official 
should be asked to present his card. 

Football Examination 

Part II of the National Federation Football Ex- 
amniation for Officials will be giver, in Kentucky 
on Monday, September 24. An official who has been 
regsitered for at least one year prior to the current 
season is eligible to take the examination and work 
for a higher rati.'g. Officials who hold the "approved" 
i-atir,g in football are required to make a minimum 
percentage grade of 80 in order to maintain this 
rating from year to year. Officials who hold the 
"certified" rating keep this rating by attending one 
or more clinics each year. Eligible officials who wish 
to take the test should write the State Office. 




Pictured above is the M. J. Cavana Memorial 
Award won by the Highlands High School of Fort 
Thomas last spring for advancement and achievement 
in swimming. A similar award will be given each year. 

Schools competing for the award for the forth- 
coming school year will be graded on five points. 
These are as follows: 

(1) Number of pupils who can swim 45 feet in 
deep water; 

(2) Number of pupils who can swim correctly 
any three of the following strokes for 50 yards: 
crawl stroke, back crawl, elementary back stroke, 
bieaststroke, side stroke; 

(3) Number of pupils who hold junior life saving 
or senior life saving certificates (American Red Cross 
or Y.M.C.A.); 

(4) School having a swimming team; 

(5) School entering a team in the State Swimming 
Meet. 

Under the first three items schools will be judged 
on the percentage of pupils involved. The grading 
penod will end on January 15, 1963. 



Basketball Clinics 

The 1962-63 rules meetings for registered basket- 
ball officials and coaches will be conducted by Charlie 
Vettiner, who has served the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association as clinic director for many years. 
The dates and sites of the meetings are as follows: 

September 30, Henderson High School, 1:30 P.M. 

September 30, Tilghman H.S., Paducah, 7:30 P.M. 

October 1, Beaver Dam High School, 1:30 P.M. 

October 1, Christian County High School, Hop- 
kinsville, 7:30 P.M. 

October 2, Snell Hall, W.K.S.C, Bowling Green, 
1:30 P.M. 

October 2, Elizabethtown High School, 8:00 P.M. 

October 7, Newport High School, 1:30 P.M. 

Octobre 7, University H.S., Lexington, 8:00 P.M. 

October 8, Morehead State College, 1:30 P.M. 

October 8, Elks' Club, Ashland, 8:00 P.M. 

October 9, Pikeville High School, 1:30 P.M. 

October 9, Hazard High School, 8:00 P.M. 

October 10, Bell H.S., Pineville, 1:30 P.M. 

October 10, Somerset High School, 7:00 P.M. 

October 11, Ky. Hotel, Louisville, 7:00 P.M. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1962 



Page Three 



K. H. S. A. A. Leaders 




Kenneth G. Gillaspie 

President 



Cecil A. Thornton 
Vice-President 



Superintendent Kenneth G. Gillaspie of the George- 
town City Schools, Board of Control member repre- 
senting Section 5, was elected President of the Board 
of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association at 
the summer meeting of the Board of Control, held on 
July 28. Assistant Superintendent Cecil A. Thornton 
of the Harlan County Schools was elected Board Vice- 
President. He represents Section 7. 

The new president, a native of Mt. Sterling, is a 
graduate of tne Mt. Sterling High SeiooL He received 
his A.B. degree from Georgetown College, and his 
M.A. degree from Teachers College, Columbia Uni- 
versity. 

Mr. Gillaspie played basketball and football at 
Georgetown College. He went to Morganfield as an 
assistant coach, and during his eleven-year tenure at 
Morganfield was principal for three years and super- 
intendent for the last eight. He went to the Garth 
High School, Georgetown, in 1939 as principal, and 
has been superintendent at Geoi-gatown since 1952. 

In 1928 Mr. Gillaspie married Miss Martha Jane 
Thompson, who died in 1936. In 1940 he married Mrs. 
Mary Willoughby Scott of Georgetown. He has two 
step-daughters and four step-grandchildren. 

At the present time Mr. Gillaspie is secretary of 
the Georgetown Rotary Club and a past-president of 
the Central Kentucky Conference, the Central Ken- 
tucky Education Association, the Kentucky Associa- 
tion of Secondary School Principals, the Western 
Kentucky Athletic Conference, the Georgetown College 
Alumni Association, the Morganfield Kiwanis Club, 
and the Georgetown Rotary Club. He was formerly 
Chairman of the Deacons of the Georgetown Baptist 
Church. He holds membership in numerous fraternal 
and educational organizations. 

Cecil A. Thornton, after graduating from the 
Newport (Tennessee) High School, continued his stud- 
ies at Tennessee Wesleyan and Union College. After 
graduation from Union College, he attended the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky where he received the M.A. de- 
gree in education administration. He is married to the 
former Gertrude Cawood. They have one son, Fred 
Lee, who is in college. 

The new Vice-President lettered in football and 
basketball for four years in high school, and in foot- 
ball, basketball and tennis for the four years of his 
college career. He worked for many years as a foot- 
ball and basketball official, and held the "approved" 
and "certified" ratings in the latter sport for several 
years. He taught science and physical education and 
served as assistant coach for three years at Evarts 
High School. His educational experience also includes 



service as assistant high school principal, pupil per- 
sonnel driector, and supervisor. 

Mr. Thornton is an active member of the Harlan 
Methodist Church, where he served for five years as 
chairman of the Board of Stewards. For a long period 
of time he has taught the Senior Men's Bible class. He 
has for many years participated in Boy Scout work, 
and has served for over sixteen years on the Harlan 
County 4-H Club Council. He is a member of the Har- 
lan County Association of Social Agencies. His pro- 
fessional affiliations include membership in the Na- 
tional Education Association, Kentucky Education As- 
sociation, American Association of School Adminis- 
traitors, and the Association for Childhood Education 
International. Mr. Thornton is also a member of Kappa 
Delta Pi, national educational honor society. 



Medical Clinics 

Plans are being completed for the medical clinics 
mentioned in the August issue of the ATHLETE, 
which are bsing sponsored jointly by the Kentucky 
State Medical Association a.od the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association. 

Six clinics have been scheduled. The same team 
of doctors will appear on each of the panels. All 
meetings will begin at 9:00 A.M. and end at noon. 
Each program will cover the following topics which 
will be discussed by the me.a named: Medical Aspects 
of Sports, Dr. Richard E. Davis of Central City; 
Orthopedic Problems in Sports, Dr. O. B. Murphy of 
Lexing-ton; Lower Extremities Injuries, Dr. George 
Gumbert of Lexington; Audience Panel Discussion. 

The dates, sites, and names of the men who will 
be i.i charge of the meetings are as follows: 

September 8, U. of K. Center, Cumberland, Ass't. 
Supt. Cecil A. Thornton of the Harlan County Schools; 

September 15, Western Kentucky State College, 
Bowling Green, Coach Jimmie Feix of W.K.S.C; 

September 22, University of Louisville, Louisville, 
Ath. Dir. Jeck Hickman, U.of L.; 

September 29, Morehead State College, Morehead, 
Ath. Dir. Bob Laughlin of M.S.C.; 

October 6, Murray State College, Murray, Dr. 
Chad L. Stewart of M.S.C.; 

October 13, Easter.? Kentucky State College, 
Richmond, Ath. Eir. Charles T. Hughes of E.K.S.C. 
U. K. Coaching School 

The University of Kentucky held its annual Coach- 
ing School in Lexington on August 8-11, 1962. The 
K.H.S.A.A. was in charge of the baseball and track 
clinics, ar.d cooperated with the Kentucky State 
Medical Association and the University of Kentucky 
Athletic Association in presenting the Fourth Annual 
Athletic Injury Preventio.-,' Conference. 

Baseball Coach Harry Lancaster of the University 
of Kentucky headed a panel which included scout 
Dixie Howell of the Houston Colts, Coach Jack Hicks 
of the Owensboro High School, and Coach Neal 
Skeeters of the duPont Manual High School. 

The track clinic had been planned by Ath. Dir. 
John Heber of the Henry Clay High School, although 
illness prevented Mr. Heber from being present at the 
meeting. Members of the track panel were Coach Tom 
Ecker of the Western Kentucky State College, Coach 
Ken Combs of the Trinity High School, and Trainer 
John Payne of the University of Kentucky. 

Dr. Richard E. Davis of Central City, Chairman 
of the Kentucky State Medical Association School 
Health Committee, headed the Athletic Injury Pre- 
vention Cor.ference. He was assisted by Dr. Winston 
Rutledge of Louisville, and by Dr. Roy Holsclaw, Dr. 
Ralph J. Angelucci, Dr. 0. B. Murphy, Dr. George 
Gumbert and Trainer John Payne of Lexington. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1962 



The Flying Dutchman 

Goebel Ritter, who served his first term 
as a regional representative at the Annual 
School For Basketball Officials in Lexington 
on August 12-13, is this month's winner of 
the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor for unselfish 
service. Goebel, who wrote some basketball 
coaching history at Hazard, gets his award 
for starting "Biddy Basketball" in this moun- 
tain city for little boys. 

"Uncle Goebel," as the little fellows have 
affectionately dubbed him, is quite a guy. He 
accomplished in fifteen minutes, at the 
School For Officials, what nobody else has 
been able to do in fifteen years — he got 
Western's Turner Elrod and Murray's Rex 
Alexander to agree on charging, blocking 
and screening. 

There were visitors at the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association's Fourteenth 
Annual School For Basketball Officials. 
Paducah had Ken Dobson on hand ; Bards- 
town sent Tom Williams, Kentuckv's modern 
day version of Alben Barklev; Hopkinsville 
was represented by Norman Hammons ; and 
Charlie Reed was there from Versailles. 

The Indiana High School Athletic Assoc- 
iation had one of its outstanding officials at 
Lexington to observe "The School" in action. 
Kenny Blankenbaker, who will be a represen- 
tative at Indianapolis at the State-wide In- 
diana High School Athletic Association 
Clinic, September 29th, pronounced our two- 
day Study of Officiating Mechanics a stride 
forward in Training Programs For Officials. 

As football season opens, all of our ath- 
letic directors should remember the sugges- 
tion which Official Al Gustafson, Jr., made 
last year relative to the dedication of the 
first game during football season to spoi'ts- 
manship. Al's idea is that the first game of 
each sport's season should emphasize sports- 
manship practices. Good neighbor practices 
at our contests is what makes the reputation 
of the Kentucky High School Athletic Assoc- 
iation excel. Nominate a community for the 
"Abou Ben Adhem" Award by writing The 
Flying Dutchman, telling him of the out- 
standing achievement which qualifies the 
nominee. Also, remember the "Game Guys." 
Now is the time to interest yourself in the 
physically handicapped young person who 
may be the guest of honor at the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association Dinner in 
Louisville next April. 

"The Athlete" joined members of the 
Kentucky Press Association last year to en- 
courage the development of recreation pro- 




THE DUTCHMAN 

grams in Kentucky and got results. This 
official organ of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association made its influence for 
progress felt during the 1961 Crusade For 
Recreation. 

Lawrence McGinnis., the Granddaddy of 
all basketball coaches, took the bit in his 
teeth at Owensboro. With Bill Carneal and 
Bob Eison on his side, "Big Mac" is about to 
get a one-half million dollar bond issue for 
recreational purposes launched in that pro- 
gressive Western Kentucky City. 

Jim Caudill, Roy Eversole and Willie 
Dawahare got Hazard moving recreationally. 
This mountain town may also get a Skee 
Slide which will make "The Mecca of The 
Mountains" resemble Sun Valley Idaho. 

Joe Mitchell of the Paducah SUN- 
DEMOCRAT got the people of the Purchase 
"on the recreational ball." Progress in rec- 
reation has been inspirational in "The land 
of Irvin S. Cobb." Paducah has shown Ken- 
tucky the economical way to operate a parks 
and recreation program. Everything recrea- 
tional there has been consolidated under a 
single controlling agency. 

Basketball Clinic time is here. The Dutch- 
man will do the Indiana Clinic at Indianapolis 
on September 29th and start his annual 
clinic tour of Kentucky the following day. 
Besides these sixteen clinics Cliff Fagan has 
invited The Dutchman to come to Chicago 
on October 15th to conduct a section of the 
National Federation Clinic which he con- 
ducts annually. 

The way totals increase is amazing! This 
is the twenty-first annual clinic tour cover- 
ing almost 40,000 miles on Kentucky's high- 
ways, byways and creek beds. A lot of gaso- 
line has trickled through the carburetor. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1962 



Page Five 



Registered Football Officials 
of the K. H. S. A. A.^1962 



pho 



number is given for an official listed, 
number unless otherwise designated. If 
n the first number is that of the home 



Cincinnati 38, 



Abele. George F.. 125 Louisiana Ave., Le.xington, 6-5671, 2-9965 
Adkins. Wendell, Box 57, Wallins Creek, MO 4-3544, 

MO 4-3444 
Allen. Charles E.. 4236 Lynn Brook Dr. Louisville 20, 541-0463 
Alley, Joe, Route No. 2, Prichard, W. Va. 
Almon. James H., 187 1st St., Lynch. 848-5942 
Alston Rev. E. Deedom. 473 South 11th St., Louisville, 

SP 2-1092, JU 7-6129 
Anders, Raleigh A.. Route 5. Box 73A. London. 4-5945, 

4-5877 
Anderson, E. W., Jr., 504 Highland, Mayfield. 247-1794, 

247-1537 
Atkinson, Charlie, 516 Fithian. Paris. 987-1227 
Attick, William E., 8504 Shirley Lane, Pleasure Ridge 

Park, WA 1-3421, 4-2284 
Autore Daniel, Box 172, Wheelwright, 2362 
Ball, Delbert, Shakertown Road. Burgin, 748-5395, 748-5221 
Barbour, Morris H., 443 Wilber Force Court, Louisville 3 
Barlow, Billy, 3050 Lynnwood Drive. Paris, 987-1947, 2-2220 

ext. 6223 or 5263 
Harnett, Willis E., 2208 W. Chestnut, Louisville, SP 8-7626, 

SP 8-2721 
Bartels, John. 423 Third Street, Dayton, 581-4250. 431-9088 
Baskins, Sylvester, 148 1st Street. Lynch, 848-5637 
Baughn, E. L., 1403 Johnson, Murray PL 3-5799, EX 5-4186 
Beach, Harold, 3007 Fourth Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Beck C. Norman, 2588 Filson, Louisville. ME 4-1737, 

Behe'i"r,'Donild'^''s.,'f37 16th Street. Paris, 987-4112, IBM 

ext. 2796 „ , t ■ ii ,i 

Bell Clarence T., 1228 South 41st Street, Louisville 11, 

'sP 8-7792, JU 4-1361 ext. 7117 
Bennett Howard, Route No. 6, Mayfield, 247-3309, 247-3613 
Bero, James J., Box 968. Williamson. W. Va 
Beyerle Joseph M.. 5731 Fourson Drive, 

Ohio, 941-2235, 941-2235 
Blackburn, Tennyson R., Box 2157, Williamson, W. Va. 
Blacketor, Dr. Paul G., 422 North Main St., BarbourviUe, 

546-3073, 646-4151 ext. 79 
Blanton, Homer, 138 New Hampshire Drive, Ashland, 

324-1730 324-3730 
Blosser, Kermit A., 80 Maplewood Drive, Athens, Ohio, 

LY 2-2792, LY 3-1011 ext. 207 
Boeh, Bill. 3804 McNicholas, Deer Park 36. Ohio, 791-8880. 

761-1876 
Bocook, Earl, 1102 Beech Street, Kenova, W. Va. 
Bocook, George Allen, 1906 Walnut St.. Kenova, W. Va. 
Boemker, Bob, 69 Thompson Ave., South Fort Mitchell, 

331-1708, 721-2700 ext. 350 
Bocsken, Francis William, 318 McClelland, St. Bernard 17, 

Ohio 281-6209, 281-2006 
Bond, Jack C, 2057 Clays Mill Road, Lexington, 7-2351, 

2-2260 e.xt. 3215 
Book, Donald C, 330 Clifton Ave., Lexington, 3-2042, 5-3880 
Bordy. Philip, 3308 Stratford Ave., Louisville, GL 8-7005, JU 

Bostick, Lord M., Jr., 419 West 12th St., Bowling Green, VI 

3-3319, VI 3-6673 
Bowman, E. G. "Dick". 687 Mt. Vernon, Lexington, 6-8111, 

Boyles, Jerry F., 2700 Algonquin, Ashland, 324-6995, 324-1111 
Brandenburg, Donald E., 714 Exeter Ave., Middlesboro, 1139 
Brichler, Joe A. 6737 Kiefer Court, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

KI 1-6049, PA 1-1984 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Drive, Louisville 5, 

GL 4-6843, JU 7-9111 
Brotzge, Maurice J., 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, TW 

3-7206 SP 6-2606 
Brown, B'ill, 1725 Quarry Hill Road, Louisville 13, GL 

8-4867, 584-7097 
Brown, John W., 2169 North 21st Street, Nitro, W. Va. 
Brown Capt., Richard G. 8 Lacey Lane, Clarksville, Tenn., 

Ft. Campbell, 3320, Clarksville, Tenn. 647-5965 
Bullock, Teddy, 148 N. Arcadia Park, Lexington, 4-4200 
Bunch, William 0., Stewart Home 53 Barren Drive, Ft. 

Stewart, Ga., 3008 
Bunn, Gary, 2718 First Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Burke, Dan, 1115 Maureen, Cincinnati Ohio, 471-9631, 

621-7411 
Burke, Harry R., 328 Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2796, 

TU 6-2386 
Burton, James E.. 401 Barbour St., Providence 667-2296 
Burton, John, 1302 Central, Ashland, 324-6964, 324-1111 



Byid, Harry G., 7331 North Timberlane Drive, Cincinnati 

43. Ohio, 561-8745, 561-8746 
Cain, Paul D., 3261 Lookout Court, Cincinnati. Ohio, EA 

1-7246, AU 1-9740 
Cain, Robert Bruce, 226 Fields, Cumberland. 598-4102 
Caldwell, Charles M. 2790 Latulla Ave., Huntington 2, 

W. Va. 
Caiman, E. C, Jr., 1124 Washington, Sturgis, 2100, 3546 
Canter, John, 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, GL 1-8218. 

JU 7-8862 
Carlson, David A., 2916 Washington. Paducah, 444-7943 
Carroll, James L., Lincoln Ave., Paintsville 789-3601, 789- 

4066 
Carswell Rev. Ernest L., P. O. Box 301, Boston, (Lebanon 

Junction) TE 3-4848. TE 3-4848 
Gathers, Bob, 802 Holly-Lane, Corbin 1338, 466 
Cecil, A. Morris. 14 Shaw Lane, Fort Thomas, 441-8421, 

381-1480 
Cecil, John O., Jr., 1210 South Green Glasgow, 661-2410, 

651-2007 
Chattin, Ernest Patrick, 2147 Central, Ashland, 324-2665, 

324-6191 
Chinn, Ralph E., 3205 Hampton St., Ashland. 324-0683 
Clarke, Edward F.. 6746-A Allison, Fort Knox, 4-6770, 4-6152 
Cle.-nmons, Sam P., 162 Woodland Ave., Lexington 6-3562, 

3-3534 
Clinard, Fred L.. 1102 Snow Ave., Madison, TW 5-2437, 

AL 6-7235 
Clusky. Joe, Red Jacket, W. Va. 
Cochran Roy H., Jr., 206 Bishop, Corbin 
Cole. Harold F., Heidrick, 646-4518, 646-4167 
Coleman, Duke, 2554 Southview, Lexington. 7-3672 
Corea Frank, Box 462, Williamson. W. Va. 
Coudret, Raymond J.. Jr., 3704 Conlin, Evansville. Indiana, 

GR 7-4259, HA 6-3339 
Cowan Robert L. P. O. Box 561, Corbin, 3332, 256 
Grace, ' James. 892 Orchard Park Rd., Hurricane, W. Va. 
Craft, Albert B., 346 Glendale Ave., Lexington, 4-5365, 

5-0960 
Crager, Bobby F. Prestonsburg 

Craig. Randy, 6069 Orange Lawn Drive, Cincinnati 38. Ohio 
Crank, Albert, Louisa Street, Catlettsburg, ( Bus. I 324-3060 
Creasey, Fred, 204 W. Washington Sebree 
Creekmore, Les, 418 Thornton St., Newport, 431-5409, 431- 

Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., 1236 76th St. North, St. Peters- 
burg Fla., 344-6361, 6-2151 

Crum, Edward E., 2136 East Ln., Louisville, EM 8-8197, 
ME 7-7621 ext. 203 

Cubbon, George C, 803 Townsend Drive. Charleston. W. Va. 

Cullen, Charles E., 3301 Utah Ave.. Louisville, EM 6-0434, 

Gulp. Willard E., P. O. Box 372, Oak Grove, Clarksville, 

Tenn. 647-6002, Ft. Campbell 3916 
Curnutte, James R., 201 East 8th Ave., Huntington W. Va. 
Current, Ellis, Ray, 1933 Bellefonte Drive, Lexington, 7-1049, 

5-4660 
Dahlander, Ward M., 507 Indian Ridge Road. Louisville 7, 

TW 6-6273. JU 5-2356 
Dallman, James W., 12 Center St. Jeffersonville, Indiana, 

BU 3-7255 
Daniel, Ernest H.. 810-23rd Street, Ashland, 324-2785. 324- 

1155 ext. 611 
Daum, Charles A., 216 Christ Road. Evansville, Ind., HA 

4-0217, HA 2-8805 
Davidson, Norman L. 7617 E. Manslick Road, Louisville 

18, CE 9-7811, ME 4-1581 
David, Clyde E., 2531 E. Euclid Ave., Ashland. 4-7804, 

324-7145 
Davis, Curt, 1119 East Burnett, Louisville, ME 4-4959, JU 2-3611 
Davis, Ralph C, 604 North 4th St., Ironton Ohio, JE 

2-8606, JE 2-8143 
Davis, William P., 1003 8th Street. Huntington, W. Va. 
Deaton, Daniel, Matewan, W. Va. 
DeMuth Paul E., 7610 Westdale Road, Louisville, 892-2465, 

SP 8-4421 
Denton. Charles, Route No. 3 127 Hubbard Lane, Hender- 
son, VA 6-4020, VA 6-9533 
Detenber, Gene, 229 Tyne Road, Louisville, TW 5-7058 
Deutsch, T. C. Jr., 1019 Lenox Place, Cincinnati 29. WO 

1-4366, PL '1-4460 
Dial Charles R., 3300 Monel Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dial, Jack W., 3179 Sumner Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dierolf, Maj. William H.. Jr., 135 Beech Street, Shaver- 
town, Pa. 
DiMuzio, Robert M., 6422 Golfway Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

541-2220, 621-8110 
Dizney, Alan, 206 4th St., Corbin 154, 1796 
Doll, Louis E., 7676 Reinhold Drive, Cincinnati 37, Ohio, 

GR 1-8757, PO 1-4210 
Dotson, W. S., 432 East 6th St. Lexington, 2-5131, 4-0350 
Downey, Robert F., 327 26th St., Dunbar, W. Va. 
Drake. Richard, 61 Edwards Court, Ft. Thomas, 441-4235 
Duncan, James T. 729 East 2nd St., Russellville, PA 6-2802 
Durkin Jack, 271 Burke Dr., Lexington, 4-4396, 4-1714 
Eastham, Everett, Jr., Route No. 1, Kenova, W. Va. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1962 



Eastham. Roger, Kenova, W. Va. 

Edelen. Ben R., 2842 Klondike Lane Louisville 18, GL 

4-3518, GL 2-2611 
Elkins. R. Percy, Elkhorn Ave., Jenkins, 445. 68 
Elliott, Carroll L., 214 Sunset Road, Elizabethtown 765- 

4:07, 765-6118 
Elovitz, Carl, 1920 Spring Grove. Lexington, 7-3994, 873-4901 
Engle, Orville, 128 Oak St. Pineville, 7-2916 
Ernst. Edward R., Box 68, 'Hebron, 689-7181 
Evans, William E.. Route No. 4, Box 358, Huntington, W. 

Va. 
Fails William M., Sr., 122 Liberty St., Hopkinsville, TU 

6-2436. TU 6-8278 
Fandrich. William W., Route No. 4, Murray, PL 3-3193, 

PL 3-3193 
Farley, Harold Kenneth, 333 Taylor Drive, Lexington, 3-2514, 

2-8328 
Faust, Jack, 3711 South West 32nd St., Hollywood. Fla., 

987-3233 
Feix! Darl W.. Miller Court, Cynthiana, 1756-J, 179 
Ferguson. Thomas L., 922 Lee Street, Barbourville. W. Va. 
Fey. Allen, 123 Garden Way. Ft. Thomas, 441-6288, 641-1800 

ext. 1461 
Fletcher. John L. 5723-B Brown, Ft. Knox, 4-2079, 4-2062 
Florence, Robert H., 2722 Trimble St.. Paducah, 444-7489, 

444-6311 ext. 576 . 

Forbes. J. W. "Jack". 208 Granvil Drive, Louisville, GL 

4-6025, SP 8-2731 . 

Fortnev Robert L.. 2817 Breckinridge Lane. Louisville, 

GL' 8-1079, TU 2-3511 ext. 472 
Foster, Berryman E., 927 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 3-1827, 

2-7847 ext. 35 
Foster, J. W., 821 Carneal Road. Lexington. 4-8058. 3-3335 
Fraley Bill. 1604 Lee Drive. Henderson. VA 7-3232 
Franklin. James A.. 3229 Holt St., Ashland, 6-3934. 4-1111 

ext. 496 
Frazer, Tom Roe, 513 East Lyon. Morganfield. 182. 222 
Freese. Oliver T.. 5618 Mapleridge, Cincinnati, Ohio, LO 1-5398, 

Fruit William E., Box 504. Route No. 1. Henderson, VA 7-3540 
Fryre'ar, William P., 1564 Baldwin, Bowling Green, VI 2-0088, 

VI 2-2411 
Fugate E. Hugh, 258 Harrod Ave., Frankfort. CA 3-1340, 

CA" 7-9661 ext. 335 
Fuller. Wilton, 533 Hiil-N-Dale, Lexington, 7-6654, 4-9895 or 

7-5122 
Funkhouser. Roy A.. 209 East 17th St.. Hopkinsville. 886-1923, 

Ft. Campbell 2422 or 3902 
Gammon. William H.. 802 Clara. Ashland. 324-6519, 324-1111 
Gettler. John F. 705 Providence Road Lexington, 6-4801. 2-0410 
Gilligan. Jack. 1146 Tassie Lane. Cincinnati, Ohio. JA 2-2042 
Gluszek, Henry J.. Main St.. Lynch. Viking 8-2598 
Golden. Billy Joe 568 East Main St., Lynch, 848-2512 
Gour, Robert A.,' 244 Audubon, Bowling Green, VI 3-9582, VI 

2-0341 ext. 241 
Gourlcy, Harold E., 1700 N. Alvord Blvd., Evansville, Ind., 

GR 6-6191 HA 3-4016 
Grady Clarence O., 420 North Main St., Marion, 965-3131 
Grah'am, James, 4505 Blackburn A-e., Ashland, 4-8169, 4-1155 

ext. 376 
Greene, Paul "Dutch". 1335 Grandview Drive. Ashland. 324- 

9216. 324-5161 
Gruneisen. Sam J.. 1101 Samuel St.. Louisville. ME 4-9964, 

JU 7-7316 
Guion. John. 671 Nashville St.. Russellville. PA 6-6519, PA 

Hadden. Newell P.. Jr., 942 Wolf Run Road, Lexington, 5-5332, 

2-7866 
Hagan Joe. 3000 Sherbrooke Road Louisville. GL 8-1325 
Hagerman. Bart, 1912 Ashland Ave., Ashland, 325-4227, 324-1111 

ext. 661 
Haffey. Stan. 1243 Garden Circle. Cincinnati 15. Ohio. PO 

1-2884, PR 1-8931 
Hagy. Harold J.. 715 Grant St.. Charleston. W. Va. 
Hall. Dale, 304 2nd Ave. Chesapeake, Ohio. 7-2370. 7-2322 
Hall John R.. 919 Highland Ave. Ashland. 324-2016, 324-1111 

ext. 323 
Hanes. Edward C, 1508 Ridgecrest. Bowling Green, VI 3-3432, 

VI 2-0089 
Harris. John C. 761 Plainview Drive, Madisonvilie, TA 1-2462. 

TA 1-4182 
Harrod. Robert. 129 Camden. Versailles. 873-3797. 873-3691 
Hawkins. Robert W.. 610 Echo Lane. Madisonvilie, TA 1-6118, 

TA 1-2990 
Hedge, David W.. 321 Mockingbird Drive Jeffersonville. Ind.. 

BU 2-2242 
Heinold. F. Thomas, 6916 Terrylynn Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

542-1125. 631-5750 
Heinold. John R. "Jack", 5739 Wielert Ave. Cincinnati, Ohio, 

542-1431 
Heinze, Frank, 204 Maple Ave., Prestonsburg. TU 6-2436 
Heinze. John G.. 39 South Highland Ave.. Prestonsburg. TU 

6-2195 TR 4-2119 
Heitzman. Warren E.. 7291 Memory Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

521-7530, 761-4100 ext. 1861 



Hellard. George D., 572 Longview Drive, Lexington. 7-2543 

3-0484 
Hertzberger, Robert Harold, 1310 Terrace, Evansville, Ind., 

4-1681, 5-6211 
Hicks Lloyd. 3747 Shaw Lane, North Bend, Ohio, 941-5109 
Hill, Earl F.. Route No. 1, Box 49-A, London, 864-2521, 864-4621 
Hofstetter, Joe. Box 2173. Williamson. W. Va. 
Hogan Cleo C. "Whimpy". Jr.. P. O. Box 86. Park City, 749- 

2267 
Holbrook, William M.. 2421 Forest Ave.. Ashland. 324-2144, 

324-5850 
Holeman, D. Fletcher, 329 Poplar St., Dawson Springs, SW 

7-2302, SW 7-4241 
Holman. S. T., 207 2nd Street, Corbin. 2752, 283 
Howerton, Jack, Jr.. Route No. 1. Box 436. Anchorage, 245- 

8456, JU 5-5031 
Huber. Carl W.. 125 North 37th St.. Louisville SP 4-3387 
Huber. Jerry. 29 East Fourth St.. Covington, 681-0897, 431-5346 
Huiet, Fred "Whitey". 7327 Osceola Madeira 43, Ohio, 561- 

9239. 241-4768 
Hulsey. Donald R.. 1222 E. Delaware. Evansville. Ind.. HA 

5-3677. WO 3-3124 
Hyland John L. 2053 Wyandotte. Owensboro, 684-8144. 684-7288 
Hynson. Fred R.. 441 Kingsway Drive. Lexington, 6-4285, 4-9895 
Idol, Billy Joe. 124 Leafwood Road. Middlesboro. 397 
Idol Lloyd. Jr.. 207 Oakwood. Middlesboro. 2014 
Isaacs, John F.. 306 Northland Drive, Lexington, 2-2931, 2-2250 

ext. 3026 
James, Gene. 10161., South 6th St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-6976 

JE 2-6224 
Jarrell. Frank, Box 46, Ceredo, W. Va. 

Jenkins, Kean 210 Morningside, Elizabethtown, 765-4887 
Johnson, Bernard M., 322 Blueberry, Lexington 
Johnson, Frank W., 326 Diecks Drive. Elizabethtown. 5-6021, 

766-4606 
Johnson, Harry A. Jr., 348 Friedman Ave., Paducah, 443-1767, 

445-6311 ext. 315 
Johnson, Stan. 2115 Ottawa, Owensboro, MU 4-2157. Gen. 

Electric Co. ext. 236 
Jones. J. Carl, 1904 Goodwin Ave.. Corbin, (Bus.) 1506 
Jones Paul. 314 Park Lane, Elizabethtown, 765-4502, Ft. Knox 

4-7117 
Jones, William A., Jr.. 262 North 38th St.. Paducah. 443-7464, 

443-4508 
Kathman, Bernie. 3060 Elmwood. Edgewood. South Fort 

Mitchell 341-7369, 621-7541 
Kauffman, Victor C, 3635 West 8th St.. Cincinnati 5. Ohio, 

WA 1-9230. MO 1-8800 
Kemper. Russell. 5732 Lauderdale Drive. Cincinnati. Ohio WE 

1-6222, MA 1-4380 
Kerr. Kenneth. 10806 Graiton Hall Road, Valley Station. WE 

7-3008, JU 6-4000 
Kessel Harry R., 407 Elmwood Place. Athens. Ohio. LY 3-4283, 

LY 3-4510 
Kimball. Philip Clyde. 5513 Westhall. Louisville, EM 8-2060 
Kimble. Frank. Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 
King, Allen V. 216 N. Main, Henderson VA 6-9647, VA 6-3321 
Kleinschmidt, Richard J., 9220 Loraiinda Drive, Cincinnati 39, 

Ohio. 522-6431 
Kraesig. Charles F., Route No. 1, Marengo Indiana, Milltown, 

Ind. ME 3-4842, Louisville EM 6-0326 
Kratzenberg, Ralph. 2412 South 10th St., Ironton, Ohio. JE 

2-6741 
Kyle. Leslie G. Jr.. 25 Chalfonte Place. Fort Thomas HI 

1-8601. KI 1-2622 
Lally. James J.. 3233 Whitfield. Apt. No. 9. Cincinnati, Ohio. 

751-5376 
Lamb, Billy, P. O. Box 232 Junction City, 332-7239 
Lambert, Irvin G.. 6110 Rural Way, Louisville 969-4718, GL 

8-1948 
Lancaster, Morris B., 204 Barberry Lane, Lexington 5-0473, 

6-6061 
Lange, William E.. Jr.. 323 Cecil, Louisville 774-2974, EM 7-1701 
Lawson, Leland. 949 Deporres, Lexington, 4-1009, 2-3044 
Lenahan, Thomas F., 3107 Doreen Way Louisville, GL 8-4490, 

JU 2-8696 
Lewis, Horace N.. 1907 Hall Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Lewis. Jesse O. D.. P. O. Box 202. Proctorville. Ohio 6-6890, 

HA 9-1381 ext. 258 
Lewis, Richard Q., 409 West 1st St., Hopkinsville, TU 6-4032 
Logan, Eli, Jeff, 6-3003. 6-2161 
Longenecker, David M.,'3910 Olympic, Louisville 7, TW 6-9071, 

TW 5-3401 est. 301 
Looney, Clifton, 1602 Walnut St.. Kenova W. Va. 
Lotz. Robert W.. 106 Buttercup, Louisville. CE 9-3976, ME 4-9491 
Lowe, Gene, Route No. 6, Box 28 London, 864-6724, 864-2207 
Lowe, Stan, Box 337, Russellville, PA 6-6647, Nashville, Tenn. 

CY 7-6521 
Lucas, Gene T., 100 Lemons Mill Rd. Georgetown, 1371, 19 
Lucas. Thomas. 2128 Clinton Place East. Owensboro, MU 4-6466, 

MU 3-2401 est. 480 
McBrayer. Don. 516 Greenup. Racelnad. 836-8857 
McCarter. Bobby. 11 Concord. Clarkville Tenn., MI 7-3170 Ft 

Campbell 3320 
McCollum. Robert G.. 406 Holiday Road. Lexington, 6-3513, 
2-2220 ext. 4251 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1962 



Page Seven 



McConachie, Byon E., 5608 Halstead Ave., Louisville, 969-9676, 

TW 6-4334 
McCowan. ConnelJ, Route No. 1 Box 251, Corbin, 2361 
McGehee, Gordon, 4629 Carroll, Covington, 261-6880 
McKinney, Adelle F., 5370 G Fisher, Fort Knox, 4-6169, 4-2816 
McGuire, Jack, 229 North 17th St., Louisville 3, JU 7-0400 
McHenry, Louis P., 408y> Main St., Hopkinsville, TU 6-2601, 

TU 6-2813 
McLemore, Jack T.. 3234 Utah, Louisville, 366-3868, 363-2791 
McNabb Edgar, 16 Beechwood Road, South Ft. Mitchell, ED 

1-3113. ED 1-1220 
McNamee. Jack, 3616 Muddy Creek, Cincinnati, Ohio, 481-1297 
Madon, Robert Lee, 215 Tennessee Ave., Pineville, ED 7-2135, 

ED 7-2135 
Magruder. Earl L., Jr.. 4100 Pixley Way, Louisville WO 

9-7046 
Makepeace William H.. 1010 Catawba Valley, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

321-4042, 321-4949 



Marks, Edward W., 9068-E Estrada Ft. Knox, 4-8678, 4-1255 

Marsili. Lee A., Lynch, 848-5673 

Matarazzo. Salvatore M., 320 N. Mulberry St., Elizabethtown, 

765-6689, Ft. Knox 4-5654 
Maxwell, Ray H., 310 Stocking Ave., Sistersville, W. Va. 
May, E. B., Jr.. Box 185. Prestonsburg, TU 6-2314, TU 6-8661 
Mayhew, William M., Pawnee Drive, Route No. 3, Elizabethtown, 

RO ,5-2706, Ft. Knox 4-7140 
Mayo, Henry L., 581 College, Paintsville 789-3871, 789-4001 
Meeks, Jack, 407 6th St., Corbin, 415, 20 
Melmige, James, Jr., Box 74 Matewan, W. Va. 
Mercke, Frank R., 417 Lotis Way, Louisville, TW 6-8460, ME 

4-9491 
Messerian, Nishan, 175 East Third St., Williamson W. Va. 
Meyer, Bud, 5319 Lilibet Court, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 251-3459, 

721-4334 
Mickey, Elbert W., Box 2471. Williamson, W. Va. 
Middlebrooks, Chuck, 313 South Ewing, Louisville 
Miller, Kenneth H., Co. C. Special Troops, Ft. Knox, (Bus.) 

4-1255 or 4-7740 
Millerhaus, William J., 923 Harris Ave. Cincinnati 6, Ohio, 

371-7904, 821-9722 
Minton. Eugene H., 901 South Green, Henderson, VA 7-3193 
Mitchell, Emmett, 120 Hamilton Pk., Lexington, 6-3611, 4-0032 
Mitchell, Vyron W., 901 Walnut, Fulton, 1648, 30 
Moody, William R. 2032 Oelander Drive, Lexington, 7-9622, 

3-3534 
Mordica, William A., 800 Edgewood Ave., Ashland, 324-7741 
Morris, Gene, 302 Wilson Court, Huntington, W. Va. 
Morrissey, Rockne, 4824 Harlon Dr. Dayton, Ohio, 513-254-4395, 

513-271-0343 
Moss, Howard A., Box 1042, Paducah, 898-3168 442-4474 
Mouser, H. D., Princeton Rd., Madisonville, TA 1-4864, SW 

7-3481 
Mullins, B. E,, Paintsville, 789-4610, 789-3580 
Muntan Peter J., 125 Woodmore Ave., Louisville 14, EM 8-8236, 

me' 7-7621 
Murray, Thomas, 611 Edgecliff, Covington, HE 1-1929 
Nau, Bill Box 209, Barbourville, 6-4112, 6-3057 
Neal, Gene, 3648 SR 132 Route No. 1, Batavia, Ohio, 753-5908, 

281-4630 
Nicholson, J. Ken, 2904 Jackson Ave., Evansville 14, Indiana, 

GR 6-3400, GR 7-5075 
Nolley, Thomas Edward, 622 Hall St., Charleston W. Va. 
Nord, Bertrand J., 4205 Naomi Drive, Louisville, 969-3369, 

895-6481 
Nord, Ed, 1734 South 23rd St., Louisville SP 4-1958, TW 5-3401 

ext. 202 
Nord, Gilbert, 6316 Krause Ave., Louisville, 447-3133, JU 7-7671 

ext. 360 
Omer, Billy W., 260 Reed Ave., Madisonville. 821-2833 
O'Nan Norman, Elmwood Drive, Henderson, 7-3968, 6-9506 
O'Neal, Bud, 3628 Kelly Way, Louisville 20. GL 8-7940, TW 

5-6765 
Osborne, Ted, Box 806, Lexington, 6-8390, 6-8390 
Overby, H. E., 1913 11th Ave. N., Nashville Tenn., AL 6-1310, 

AL 5-0678 or AL 4-8323 - Station 8 
Owens, Charles, Jr., 2635 Guyan Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Palmer, Carl A., 2506 South 7th St., Ironton Ohio, JE 2-6244 
Parsley, Clyde E., Route No. 2, Providence, 667-2624, Madison. 

ville 821-9004 
Pate, Llyd W., 608 Ronnie Road, Madison Tenn., 895-3522, 

TW 5-5472 
Peeno, Harry R., 30 Butler St., Ludlow 

Pennington, Mel, Route No. 1, Box 294, Pikeville, 7-7636 7-7323 
Pinson, Eugene, 3208 Hackworth, Ashland, 324-6548, 324-3101 
Powers, Tom 1920 Knoll Ridge Lane, Cincinnati 31, Ohio, 

521-0195, 961-5335 
Prior, Lowell F., 1722 Highland Ave., Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 

3-0700, EL 3-6129 
PuUins, Robert G., 211 Wilkinson St., Huntington W. Va. 
Rapp, J. Lowell, 444 Richland Ave., Box 411, Athens, Ohio, 

LY 2-1441, LY 3-1821 
Rapp, William. 215 Heplar, Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-1983 



Ray, Shirley G., 6491 Scheiring Drive, Hamilton, Ohio, 895-3428, 

892-2411 
Keddington, Jim, 3824 Glenside Place, Louisville 13. GL 2-9689 
Reece. Fred, 149 Elm, Versailles, 873-3623, Lexington 7-3977 
Reed, Gordon "Moe", 22 Riverside Parkway, Ft. Thomas. 441- 

4946. 641-4507 or 642-4507 
Renfro, John E., 446 Florence, Williamsburg, 6488, 6808 
Rentz. Thomas W., 161 Chenault Road Le.xington 6-8242 

3-2880 
Rhatigan, Alfred J., 10663 Chelmsford Road, Cincinnati 40 

Ohio, 825-2479, 351-6400 
Rieman. Bob. 2004 Dallas, Cincinnati, Ohio, 522-3694 
Riggins, Jason, Box 2691, Williamson, W. Va. 
Riggs. William T., 103 W. McElroy, Morganfield. 170 Hender- 
son VA 7-9891 
Rivlin, Jule, Marshall University, Huntington, W. Va. 

JA 3-0768, 2-8352 
Robinson, Don, 1906y^ Walnut St. Kenova, W. Va. 
Roettger, W. H., 2856 Hikes Lane, Louisville GL 1-9177 JU 

4-4006 
Rogers, J. B., 832 12th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Rolph Harold J., 915 South 7th St., Ironton. Ohio JE 2-4036 

JE 2-3231 
Rudolph, Fred, Jr., 6600 Jeanine Drive Louisville 969-3013 

ME 5-7441 
Russell, Charles B., Jr., Lynch, 848-2866 
Russell. Gary E.. 1024 Book St., Henderson 
Russell, Joe, Box 213, Russellville, PA 6-6983, PA 6-6983 
Sallee, Alan L.. 1737 Deer Park, Louisville 5, GL 1-6478 
Sanders, Mel 3910 Sunset Ave.. Paducah, 442-3650 
Sapp, Edward, 2806 Dell Brooke, Louisville, GL 8-8989 GL 

4-7511 ext. 602 
Sauter, Harold S., 8608 Jenny Lind Drive, Louisville 19 WO 

9-6381, EM 8-3381 ext. 269 or 231 
Schad. Jim, 10717 Chelmsford Road, Cincinnati. Ohio 825-3343 
Scharfenberger, Irv T., 7267 Jethve Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio 

561-6378, 561-6378 

'°''68'"f272'.%21-?766'''' ^"'"'"'"" ^""^^ «---«' Ohio. 
Schlich, Paul. 3316 Dean Drive, Louisville, GL 8-6765 TW 6-0211 
Schmitt, Karl F., 710 E. Walnut, Louisville 2, 772-0131, 584-8269 
Schmitt, Paul E. 602 South 40th St., Louisville, SP 8-5356 

ME 6-6246 
Schwetschenau, Paul, 7013 Clover Noll Dr., Cincinnati 31 Ohio 

931-3648, 761-4100 ext. 3411 
Scott, Bill, 1816 McDonald Road, Lexington, 2-3316 2-3695 
Scott, Luther, 211 Spruce St., Murray, PL 3-4649, PL 3-3782 
Seale, Frank E., 1001 Tates Creek Road. Lexington, 6-8646, 

Seale, William E., 1001 Tates Creek, Lexington, 6-8645 2-2200 

ext. 2872 
Sellier, Ed, Jr., 136 Hamilton Park, Lexington 3-3148 
Sellman, John B., 4031 Oilman Ave., Louisville 7 TW 7-'757 

JU 5-3393 I, ivv , -loi, 

Shanks, Thomas E., 3210 Ainslie Way Louisville 20, GL 2-9513 

JU 4-1361 ext. 473 
Shaw, Earl, 121 Hagan Court. Lancaster, 792-2370, 548-2208 
Shaw, John H., 219 East Lee, Mayfield, CH 7-1907 
Shaw. Stanley E., 6530 Goldcrest Drive, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 

GR 1-1100, MU 1-3510 



Shewmaker, Wayne, 206 W. Meadow Drive. Clarksville Tenn 

647-4112, Ft. Campbell ext. 3320 
Shumate, Roy V., 201 Island, Harlan 189 
Skinner. Ernest, 206 Pine St., Murray, PL 3-3893 
Sloan, Wallace P., 419 Oread Road, Louisville TW 5-1126 

TW 7-2564 
Smith, Edgar J.. 3904 Farmview Ave., Louisville, GL 8-1286, 

EM 6-8745 
Smith, Richard T.. 2136 Clay St., Paducah 444-6112 
Smith, Thomas E., U Polster Drive. Evansville, Indiana GR 

7-3302 
Smith. Walter K.. 1722 Melvin Court, Cincinnati Ohio JA 

1-9774. MU 1-3100 
Smith, Wyatt Jack, 203 Ohio, Somerset, 679-1211 
Snyder, Gus, 2420 Adams, Ashland, 324-7927, 324-1111 ext. 402 
Spencer, H. Edward, 1149 Ninth Ave., Huntington 1, W Va. 
btanibaugh, Robert A., 811 South Alves, Henderson, VA 6-9657, 

Staples, Charles, 1610 Lee Drive, Henderson, 827-3174 
Staten, Joseph B., 128 Mills Drive, Louisville 16, 447-4924 
Steele, Charles, 544 Main St., Lynch, 848-6972* 
Stephens, Robert J., Box 391, Montgomery, W. Va. 
Stephenson, Harry, 2210 Circle Drive. Lexington. 4-9620 5-2960 

ext. 284 
Stevens, Alex, 616 Highfield, Danville, 236-4730 236-5211 
Stevens, William D., 1033 Claiborne Way, Lexington 6-2578 

2-2220 ext. 3209 s^/i. u^Jio, 

Stewart. Herbert. 330 Maple St.. Hazard, GE 6-2438 GE 6-2438 
Straight, Roy L., 1701 Jackson Ave.. Huntington W Va 
Strain, Richard P., Box 47. North Trailer Park, Fort Knox, 

4-8394, 4-1265 
Strimer, Albert C, 2610 Broad St., Parkersburg. W Va 
Strong. Arnett. 116 Kentucky Blvd., Hazard, GE ' 6-3938, GE 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1962 



6-2141 
Stump. Bennett, 2601 Grand Ave., Parkersburg, W. Va. 
Sturgill, Barkley, Prestonsburg, TU 6-2477. TU 6-2758 
Sullivan, A. G.. 211 Goodwin Ave., Corbin, 2290, 9070 
Sullivan. Don Chris. 3020 Dartmouth Drive. Lexington, 7-6953, 

Frankfort CA 3-8221 ext. 61 
Swinford. John. 440 East Pike, Cynthiana, 205, 1887 
Talbot. William G. III. Route No. 1, Paris, 987-2961 
Taylor, D. C, Box 176, Benham, 848-2284, 848-5406 
Taylor, Dennis H., 1406 Hughes, Murray, PL 3-4825, PL 3-5512 
Thomas, Charles. 410 East Drive, Fulton, 1948, 6 
Thomas, Frnak M., 520 South 10th St., Louisville 3, 683-6354, 

-TU 4-9178 
Thomas, Raymond E., 1106 Main St., Sturgis, 2151, Henderson 

VA 7-9891 
Thompson. Jack, 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville 5, GL 2-9265 
Thompson. Jack F.. Jr.. 1310 Rammers Ave., Louisville, ME 

4-3517. JU 4-5311 
Thompson. Ralph N.. 649 Ivy Hill, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, BL 

1-3394, CL 1-2925 
Thurman, J. W., Manchester 
Timmering, George E., P. O. Box 204, Elizabethtown, 765-2032, 

765-2032 
Tirey, Lt. Col. James H., U.S.A.M.B., Fort Knox, 4-3662, 4-8559 
Tolley, D. E., 283 Lafayette Parkway, Lexington, 7-7377, 7-7577 
Trautwein, Jim. 4313 Martha. Louisville, 458-7438, 454-3449 
Treas, Joe W., 609 Green St., Fulton, 1056. 309 
Troutman, Bill, Kenvir, 170N 
Trunzo, Nick, 1015 Elaine Drive, Louisville, 969-7736, GL 4-7611 

ext. 2879 
Tussey. George, Box 381, Route No. 1. Ashland, 739-4279 
VanGilder. Bill. 8925 Old South Park Road, Louisville 19, 

969-5759, JU 4-1121 ext. 511 
VanHoose, Jack D., Short St., Paintsville, 789-4896, 789-3681 
VanKirk, Alvia S.. 107 South Poplar, Corbin, 1546, 146 
Van Meter, David G.. 3148 Talisman Rd., Louisville, GL 4-4030 
Varner, Ray G., P. O. Box 427, Boron, Calif. 
Vennari, Paul, Box 13, Beokley, W. Va., 253-8487, 2S2-6911 
Vennell. Robert H., 2056 Donald Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Vinciguerra. Philip, Matewan, W. Va. 
Waide. Harry D.. 260 E. Arch, Madisonville, TA 1-1998, TA 

1-3870 



Nick, Route No. 6, Berea Road, Lexington, 5-1233, 



Dr., Louisville, GL 4-6001, 

Washer, Stanley. 1625 Catalpa St., Louisville 11, SP 8-7622 
Watson, Ronald L., 313 Eastwood Dr.. Bedford, Ind. BR 9-1875, 

BR 9-1506 
Watts. Shirley R., 802 Carneal Road, Lexington, 5-2743, 2-0410 
Weaver, Ray, 65 Thompson. South Fort Mitchell, 331-3761 
Weber, David, 3707 St. Germaine. Louisville. TW 6-4298, ME 

4-1651 ext. 236 
Welch. Bill, 1324 Beech Ave., Cincinnati 5, Ohio, 471-8090, 721- 

9869 
Welch. J. D., 3201 Hampton St., Ashland. 324-3337, 324-1165 

ext. 369 
Welch, Tom. 3932 Vine Vista Place, Cincinnati. Ohio, 281-8094, 

421-5700 ext. 691 
Werkowitz. Jack. 4614 Miller Road, Blue Ash 42, Ohio, SY 

1-5382, SY 1-5870 
White. James "Pete", 401-C Smith Ave., Cumberland, (Bus.) 

848-6486 
Whittemore. Paul P., Post Office Bldg., Prestonsburg, TU 

6-3334, TU 6-2680 
Wigginton. Al. Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, SP 6-7881 
Wilkerson. Benjamin P., 1509 Southfield Road, Evansville 15. 

Indiana. GR 6-4660. UL 3-3381 
Williams. Bert O.. 953 Lucy Lane. Lexington, 4-8773, 2-2626 
Williams. Gene, 304 Deepwood Drive, Elizabethtown, RO 5-4831, 

765-4192 
Willis, Donald A.. Allen. TR 4-2485, Martin, Ky. BU 5-3407 
Wilson. Louis O., 606 Wichita Dr., Lexington, 7-6374. 4-1715 
Winfrey, Shelby. 315 Sharon Drive. Campbellsville, 465-8392 
Womack. William H.. 1204 Loeb Henderson. VA 6-4526 
Wurtz. Emil, 18 East 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 471-0526, 381- 

1232 
Wyatt, William J., 209 E. Maxwell, Lexington, 2-4568, 5-3600 

ext. 2841 
Zimmer. Tom, 3530 Cherry Tree Lane, Erlanger, 341-4566, 431- 

4272 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

Ths Board of Control of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association met at the Kenlal^e Hotel, Ken- 
tucky Lake State Park, on Saturday morning, July 28, 
1962. The meeting was called to order by retiring 
President W. H. Crowdus at 9:00, with all Board 
members. Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assist- 
ant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Reading- of the minutes of the April Sth meeting 
was waived, since the members of the Board had re- 
ceived copies of these minutes. 

Mr. Crowdus and Jack Dawson, who on June 30, 
1962, had ended long terms on the Board, expressed to 
other members of the Board present their pleasure at 
having had an official connection with the K.H.S.A.A. 
and at having been associated with other members of 
the Board in serving the Association. Other members 
of the Board answered with appropriate remarks. 

Mr. Crowdus stated that the next order of business 
was the election of the president and vice-president 
of the Board of Control. Oran C. Teater nominated 
K. G. Gillaspie for the presidency of the Board of 
Control, and the nomination was seconded by Preston 
Holland. Foster J. Sanders moved, seconded by Cecil 
A. Thornton, that the nominations cease and that the 
secretary be authorized to cast one ballot for Mr. 
Gillaspie. The motion was carried, with Mr. Gillaspie 
not voting. 

Don R. Rawlings nominated Cecil A. Thornton for 
the vice-presidency and Ralph Dorsey nominated Oran 
C. Teater. Preston Holland moved, seconded by Don 
R. Rawlings, that the nominations cease. The motion 
was carried. The candidates were asked to retire. Mr. 
Thornton was elected by a show of hands, the vote 
being 3-2 in his favor. 

President Gillaspie welcomed to the Board Super- 
intendent Ralph C. Dorsey of the Caverna Independent 
District and Foster J. Sanders of the Louisville Male 
Hig-h School, newly elected directors. 

The Commissioner reported that a vacancy now 
exists on the Board of Control, Mr. Robert P. Porsythe 
having notified him recently tihat he would move to 
Princeton, Kentucky, on July 1 to become Superinten- 
dent of Caldwell County Schools. The Commissioner 
stated that, since Mr. Forsythe now holds an adminis- 
trative position in Section 1, he is no longer eligible to 
represent Section 2, under the provisions of Article 4, 
Section 2-a, of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution. He fur- 
ther stated that nominations were now being received 
from principals in Section 2 for Board membership, 
and that the replacement for Mr. Forsythe will be 
elected to serve for the remainder of the 1962-63 K. 
H.S.A.A. year. His interpretation of K.H.S.A.A. reg- 
ulations was that the Board member who serves the 
Section for this short period of time will be eligible to 
serve his Section for two full four-year terms if re- 
elected. 

The Commissioner made a report to the Board on 
the receipts and disbursements of the K.H.S.A.A. for 
the year 1961-62. Copies of the audit, recently pre- 
pared by the Johnson-Fowler Company of Louisville, 
had been mailed to members of the Board. Totel funds 
on hand June 30, 1962, were reported as being $112,858. 
88. The Commissioner stated that the complete break- 
down on receipts and expenses, appearing in the audit, 
would be printed in a forthcoming issue of the maga- 
zine. He then presented a suggested K.H.S.A.A. bud- 
got for the 1962-63 school year, with estimated re- 
ceipts of $118,610.00 and estimated disbursements of 
$118,400.00. Preston Holland moved, seconded by 
Foster J. Sanders, that the report of the Commission- 
er be accepted and approved; and that the 1962-63 K. 
HjS.A.A. budget be adopted as presented. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1962 



Page Nine 



Don R. Rawlings g-ave a report on the recent Na- 
tional Federation Annual Meeting, held at Saskatoon, 
Saskatchewan. 

October 6 was set as the date of -the fall meeting 
of the Board of Control. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, second by Don R. Raw- 
lings, that the insurance subsidy for each Association 
member school in 1962-63 be a basic amount of .$30.00, 
with an additional subsidy of $50.00 for each school 
maintaining football. The motion was carried un- 
animously. 

There was a discussion of the new football dis- 
tricts which are to be set up for 1962 in Region 4 of 
Class A, and in Region 1 of Class AA; and of recom- 
mended district changes in Region 2 of Class AAA. 
Upon recommendations by the Commissioner and 
Assistant Commissioner, Gran C. Teater moved, sec- 
onded by Ralph C. Dorsey, that the following districts 
be established in Region 4 of Class A, Region 1 of 
Class AA, and Region 2 of Class AAA 

Class A, Region 4, District 1 — Barbourville, Lily, 
London, Lynn Camp, Pineville, Williamsburg; District 
2 — Buckhorn, Dilce Combs, East Main (Lynch), Har- 
lan, Loyall, Rosenwald (Harlan), Wallins, West Main 
(Lynch). 

Class AA, Region 1, District 1 — Bowling Green, 
Caldwell County, Christian County, Franklin-Simpson, 
Hopkinsville, Mayfield, Paducah, Warren County; 
District 2 — Crittenden County, Daviess County, Hen- 
derson, Henderson County, Madisonville, Owensboro, 
Owensboro Catholic. 

Class AAA, Region 2, District 1 — Butler, Fairdale, 
Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, Valley, Western; Dis- 
trict 2 — DurreltJt, Eastern, Fern Creek, Seneca, Wag- 
gener, Wesitport. 

The motion concerning- football districting was 
carried unanimously. The Commissioner reported the 
probable addition of eight schools which will begin to 
sponsor football in 1962, and was authorized to class- 
ify these schools as follows: Class A, Region 1 — Port 
Campbell; Class A, Region 2 — Berea, Eminence, 
Greensburg, Perryville; Class AA, Region 3 — Boyd 
County, Fleming County, Rowan County. 

There was a discussion concerning forfeited foot- 
ball games, with respect to the counting of these 
games in the ratings. The Commissioner pointed out 
the provisio-os of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 24, Section 2, 
which states: "When a school fails to carry out its 
contract to play a regularly scheduled game, the game 
shall be forfeited to the offended school." All mem- 
bers of the Board thought that forfeited games should 
be counted in determining the Dickinson ratings, but 
saw no necessity of counting these games in breaking 
ties in the ratings in a case where a school discontinu- 
es football. Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Oran 
C. Teater, that the football regulations be amended to 
provide that a game forfeited because a school dis- 
conitinues football shall not be counted in applying the 
system used to break Dickinson ties. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Foster J. Sanders brought to the Board a com- 
plaint from certain school administrators in his area 
concerning the heavy concentration of spring sports 
on the K.H.S.A.A. calendar, especially with respect to 
tournaments and meets held on dates other than week- 
ends. Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Foster J. 
Sanders, that President Gillaspie appoint a committee 
of three to study the problem of spring sports, wiifch 
the possibility of working oult a schedule to interfere 
less with the school program. The motion carried. 
President Gillaspie appointed Foster J. Sanders, Don 
R. Rawlings, and Preston Holland as members of the 



committee. 

The Commissioner read a letter from Supt. Ben 
Flora of the Bellevue Public Schools, inviting the 
Board to hold the 1963 State Tennis Tournament for 
boys at the Bellevue High School. Ralph C. Dorsey 
moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, that the Bellevue 
High School be named the site of the 1963 State High 
School Tennis Tournament for boys. The motion was 
carried by a vote of 5-2. 

The Commissioner reported that he had received a 
letter from Chairman E. J. Paxton, Jr., of the Ken- 
tucky Commission on Public Education, inviting the 
members of the Board of Control to meet with the 
Commission at an early date and asking for a sugges- 
tion concerning a choice of dates prior to the end of 
the summer. The Commissioner stated that he had 
accepted the invitation for members of the Board of 
Control and had suggested that the date be at some 
time during the August 15-31 period. All members of 
the Board expressed their willingness to meet with 
the Commission on Public Education, and eaclh mem- 
ber stated that he would make every effort to attend 
the joint meeting of the 1;wo groups on the date to be 
selected by Mr. Paxton. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by Foster J. 
Sanders that all bills of the Association for the period 
beginning April 6, 1962, and ending July 27, 1962, be 
allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting ad- 
journed. 



New Baseball Film 



The National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations had a premier showing of 
OFFICIAL BASEBALL during the 43rd Annual 
Meeting at Saskatoon, Canada, July 1962. OFFICIAL 
BASEBALL is the newest addition to the Official 
Sports Film Service family of OFFICIAL rules films. 
The K.H.S.A.A. has secured two prints of the film 
and has placed them on loan with the Film Library 
at the University of Kentucky. 

OFFICIAL BASEBALL was produced under the 
sanction and supervision of the National Federation 
of State Hig'h School Athletic Associations and Allied 
Groups. This film is the twenty-first in the series of 
official films and the ffith baseball film. Wheaties 
Sports Federation and Wilson Sportnig Goods Com- 
pany served as co-sponsors of the film as they have 
for the previous twenty i-ules films. 

The scenes for OFFICIAL BASEBALL were film- 
ed on Henley Field, Lakeland, Florida. The host state 
association was the Florida High School Activities 
Association. Playing personnel was chosen from the 
Lakeland Senior High School. Members of the Na- 
tional Alliance Baseball Rules Committee served as 
the Technical Staff, and thereby assured the au- 
thenticity of the rulings for the situations filmed. 
Outstanding Umpires from Iowa, Georgia and Florida 
served in their official capacity. 

The theme of OFFICIAL BASEBALL is centered 
around informative and entertaining play situations 
depicting the official rules interpretations covering 
the phases of batting, pitching, base running, fielding 
and umpiring. The film was produced to stimulate 
interest and knowledge for the fan as well as players, 
officials and baseball administrators. 

OFFICIAL BASEBALL is recommended for use 
by umpires, coaches, players and fans for a better 
understanding and enjoyment of one of our national 
pastimes — Baseball. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1962 



Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rule. They are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

Installment I 

1. Play: May a player who is not wearing a 
mouth and tooth protector legally participate ? 

Ruling: Not unless the player has been exempted 
by a dentist from wearing a mouth and tooth pro- 
tector. Any exemption should be in written form and 
filed by the dentist at the player's school. The policy 
of using a written r.otice for this purpose will eli- 
minate misunderstanding due to poor communications 
which could otherwise occur. It is the responsibility of 
the player's coach (or his captain or the player liim- 
self) to notify the umpire of the exemptiom prior to 
the start of the contest. This notification may be ver- 
bal and the player should be identified by name and 
number. 

2. Play: Are players required to wear a mouth 
and tooth protector during practice sessions ? 

Ruling: In the interest of both player welfare 
and efficiency, the protectors should be worn in any 
situation, game or practice, in which contact may 
ensue. Unless players wear protectors during practice 
sessions, they will r.ot be accustomed to them and, 
therefore, may be uncomfortable and thereby affect 
the players' efficiency when they are required to wear 
them during a game. Injuries to teeth occur during 
pi-actice as well as they do during games when pro- 
tectors are not worn, in fact, records indicate there 
are more dental injuries in practice than in games. 
It is assumed that tnis is because more time is de- 
voted to practice. 

3. Play: Home team A furnishes a white or yel- 
low ball with no stripes. 

Ruling: If team B approves the ball, it is legal 
to use it. However, no ball except a tan-colored ball 
with white stripes may be used unless both teams 
approve. 

4. Play: Al, who may have been: (a) the runner; 
or (b) a non- runner, is prostate or nearly prostate on 
the ground. Bl then charges into him or dives or 
jumps on him. 

Kuhf.g: Piling on in both (a) and (b). In (a), 
pihng on is usually a dead ball foul since the ball is 
likely to be dead when the infi-action occurs. In (b), 
it may occur during either a live or dead ball. 

5. Play: What is piling on? 

Ruling: "Piling on" is the act of divicg or jump- 
ing on or throwing the body into or onto an opponent 
wno is lying on the ground or nearly so. Whether the 
ball is dead or alive is not a factor. The offended 
player may or may not have been the ball carrier, 
although most frequently he will have been. Usually, 
the player piled on is in a defenseless position. Most 
of tne time the act is inter.tional, but it may be the 
result of a careless player who has abandoned the 
control of his body. Whether it is intentional has no 
bearing on the judgment of the act. It may be judged 
'■piling on" even though it is unintentional. The act is 
an extreme hazard to the prostate player and it 
frequently results in serious injury. The infraction 
demands prompt and consistent enforcement. 

6. Play: A substitute replaces Al: (a) because 
Al is injured or apparenlty injured; or (b) because 
Al must have his equipment repaired. 

Ruling: In both (a) and (b) Al must remain out 
of the game for at least one play. It is judged there 
is a safety factor in both of these situations and, 
therefore, any player leaving the game because of in- 



jury or equipment repair cannot return until after one 
down has been played. That is, he cannot "buy" his 
way ir.to the game at the expense of a 5-yard penalty. 

7. Play: A12 replaces Al as a player but injury 
or equipment repair is not the cause for the substitu- 
tion. For example, Al leaves the field but, during 
the same dead ball period, reenters and replaces A2; 
or (b) A12 replaces Al and then, during the same 
dead ball, A13 replaces A12. 

Ruling: Illegal substitution in both (a) and (b). 
5-yard penalty. However, in (a), Al may remain in 
the game as it is considered he '"bought his way back 
in" with the 5-yard penalty. In (b), the replacement 
of A12, who did not participate, is also permitted but 
the pe:'.alty is enforced. 

8. Play: Does the blocker always commit an in- 
fraction if arm or hand, while the hand is in contact 
with his body, is also in contact with his opponent 
above the opponent's shoulder? 

Ruli.:g: No. There are two situations in which 
there may bs contact with the blocker's arm or hand 
by the blocker's opponent without an infraction re- 
sulting. In both of these situations the blocker's 
opponent is considered to have made the contact. If a 
stationary blocker with his hand and arm in a legal 
position is charged into by an opponent (who may or 
may not be shorter) so that the ensuing contact is 
made with the blocker's hand or arm above the oppon- 
ent's shoulder, the blocker's opponent is considered to 
have made the contact and, hence, there is no infrac- 
tion. It must be emphasized that in the above situation 
the blocker's opponent charges nito the blocker and 
that the blocker does not step, move, bend or twist 
into the path of his opponent. If the blocker moves, he 
is judged to have made the contact and if it is above 
his opponent's shoulder, it is an infraction. This ruling 
is not in conflict with Case Book Situation 21, which 
specifies "Al contacts Bl" and it is, therefore, an 
infraction. The second situation which is not an in- 
fraction when there is contact between a blocker's 
arm or hand and an opponent above his shoulder is the 
one in which the opponent submarines, or makes an 
extremely low charge and contact results above the 
shoulder of the low-charging player. Here, too, the 
interpretation is that the defensive player is making 
the contact and, hence, there is no violation. If a de- 
fensive player makes a low charge or submarines at 
an angle and the blocker moves into his path or charg- 
es into him so that the blocker's hand or arm con- 
tacts the defensive player above his shoulder but in 
an otherwise legal position, the blocker has not com- 
mitted an infraction. In this case, even though the 
blocker steps or moves, his opponent's low charge is 
considered to have caused the contact. 

9. Play: Forward pass by A4 crosses the line 
and is touched by: (a) eligbiie All; or (b) B7. In- 
eligible A8 then uses his hands on an opponent. 

Ruling: In both (a) and (b) A8 may use his 
hands but it must be "in an actual attempt to get at 
the ball." If A8 is in such a positoin on the field that 
he could not get to the ball, he may not use his hands. 
In (b), he becomes eligible to touch or catch the ball, 
but in (a) he does not. 

10. Play: Kick-off from K's 40 goes to K's 48, 
where: (a) Rl recovers it; or (b) Rl touches it and 
K2 recovers it. 

Ruling: No infraction in either (a) or (b). In 
(a), the ball belongs to R and in (b) it is K's ball. 

11. Play: Punt is blocked behind line so that it 
rises high but comes down on the scrimmage line 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1962 



Page Eleven 



FILMS 



The films listed below are in the Film Library 
of the University of Kentucky Department of Exten- 
sion. The Code letters "e,j,s,c,a," refer to elementary, 
junior high, senior high, college and adult audiences 
who may enjoy the particular film listed. The rental 
prices shown do not apply to schools which use one of 
the special subscriotion service plans, offered by the 
Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. 

Football 
BALL HANDLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, 
$1.50. 

Fundamentals of ball handling are stressed; 
stance, grip, "feel" of the ball, finger-tip control, 
adjustment before throwing or kicking, receiving 
passes from center or from a back, catching passes 
and punts, ways of cari'ying ball, and changing from 
one hand to another. Game shots are presented, using 
slow motion and stop action techniques, and superim- 
posed animation to illustrate principles. 
BETTER FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75. 

This film, made by the Official Sports Film Ser- 
vice and recommended by the National Federation, 
includes game situations and their relation to the 
rules. Movie and T. V. actor Bill Frawley is the 
coach of a team which learns "the hard way" w*hy 
knowledge of the rules is important. The film is in- 
strumental for coaches, officials and players, and 
has enough entertaining value for school assemblies 
and service clubs. 
BLOCKING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50. 

Fundamentals of good blocking are taught in this 
film: position, speed, drive, follow-through, timing, 
and body control. Describes shoulder and body blocks, 
demonstrating several varieties of these. Importance 
of good physical condition, practice, and experience 
are emphasized. Special photography used to illustrate 
different points. 

FOOTBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$.75. 

In the film an extrovert "Old Grad" chooses 
Football Rules as quiz show categoi^. His experience 
with official interpretations proves interesting, 
humorous and embarrasing. At the end, he realizes 
his knowledge is very meager on such things as — 
officials and their duties — What constitutes pass 
interference — rights on muffed punt — etc., and 
his wife had to take over for him. 
FOOTBALL GAMES OF UK, j-s-c-a, 3 reels each, 
$.75. 

Several old football films showing University of 
Kentucky in such games as Cotton Bowl, Sugar Bowl, 
etc., have been placed in the library for those who 
wish to use them. 
GAME OF GAMES, j-s-c-a, 1% reels, $2.50 

The highlights of the 1946 Army-Navy football 
game are presented in slow motion. It is filmed by 
"official" photographer of the Ajthletic Association 
of the U. S. Naval Academy. 
OFFICIAL FOOTBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75. 

This film portx'-ays the play situations covering 
the basic rules of football as played under the 
National Alliance Code. The theme is centered around 
the official interpretations of the rules as they apply 
to the three teams always present on the field, the 
home team, the visiting team and that all important 
third team, the officials. 
TACKLING IN FOOTBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50. 

Tackling properly is shown as the result of 
application of certain fundamentals: good physical 
condition, speed, body placement, drive, sure grip, 



timing, and body control. Shoulder and cross body 
tackles are demonstrated in various ways, with 
special instrucitons for safety adn means of a re- 
ducing shock. 



School for Basketball Officials 

The fourteenth annual School for Basketball 
Officials was held at the Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, on 
August 12-13, 1962. Basketball Clinic Director Charlie 
Vettiner directed the school. 

The aim of the school is uniformity in officiating. 
Topics which were discussed during the three ses- 
sions were: rules changes and interpretations; general 
study of the rules; a signal drill to secure unifomi 
of signaling of violations, fouls, etc.; floor technique 
on jump balls, fouls, and field goals; how to deter- 
mine primary responsibility in charging and block- 
ing situaitions, for contact on stationary screens, and 
for contact on moving screens; guarding the dribbler 
and the player with the ball; switching, post play, 
rebounding, receiving a pass-out on a fast break, and 
screen play; and tips to officials. 

The services of the regional representatives who 
attended the school will be available to Association 
member schools throughout the forthcoming basket- 
ball season. The men wall conduct additional clinics 
for officials, coaches, and players, and will assist 
beginning officials in registraition. 



Football Questions 

where: (a) B2 bats it toward A's goal line; or (b) 
A2 bats it toward B's goal line. 

Ruling: Infraction for illegal batting in both 

(a) and (b). Batting a kick other than in an attempt 
to block it is illegal. 

12. Play: Al fumbles when contacted by Bl, who 
is tackling. While actually attempting to recover the 
loose ball, A2: (a) charges imto the back of B2; or 

(b) uses his hands to push B2 in the back. 

Ruling: Clipping in (a), but legal action in (b). 
The use of the hand or arm on the back of an oppon- 
ent is not clipping when it is a legal attempt to re- 
cover a loose ball. 

13. Play: In attempting to recover a free-kick or 
fumble which has touched the ground, the foot of 
Al: (a) inadvertently; or (b) intentionally strikes the 
ball. 

Ruling: The inadvertent act in (a) is ignored 
but the intentional act in (b) is an infraction. 

14. Play: Al intentionally kicks at: (a) Bl; or 
(b) a fimibled ball, but he makes no contact in either 
case. 

Ruling: Foul in both (a) and (b). 

15. Play: Al leaps into the air close to the side- 
line and, with both feet off the ground, catches a for- 
ward pass. His left foot is the first to touch the 
ground: (a) inbounds, after which his right foot 
touches the ground out-of-bounds; or (b) on the 
boundary line. 

Ruling: Completed pass in (a), provided the of 
ficial believes Al had control when his left foot 
touched the ground inbounds, but incomplete in (b). 

16. Play: In a balanced line, left tackle A6 takes 
a standing position on the line. His hands are not on 
or near the ground. Prior to snap, he moves back, goes 
behind the snapper and then takes a position on the 
line between his teammates, the right guard and the 
right tackle. 

Ruling: Not a false start but, after A6 has taken 
this position, the snap must be delayed one full second. 

17. Play: Lineman A7, on line, takes: (a) a 
standing position with arms at side; or (b) crouched 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1962 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



348 Southland Drive 



Lexington, Ky. 



School Representative 

FRED "Rock" REECE 

Versailles, Ky. 

Phone 873-3623 



Distributors of: 



Spanjian 

Southern 

Nocona 

Wilson 

Spalding 

Rawlings 

Voit 

Adidas Track Shoes, State of Ky. 

Dehen & New Era Sweaters 



Bike 

Cramer 

Stim-0-Stam Tablets 

Wigwam Socks 

Butwin Jackets 

Adirondack Bats 

Trophies 

E. R. Moore Gym Suits 

Riddell Helmets & Shoes 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



Gene Stokley 



7-3977 



Dick Wallace 



position with hands or elbows on knees. From either 
position he drops to a position with a hand or hands 
on or near the ground. 

Ruling: Legal shift. If movement of A7 simu- 
lates action at the time of the snap, it is a false start. 

18. Play: In attempting to punt, Al after re- 
leasing the ball from his hands, strikes it with his 
lower leg: (a) before; or (b) after the ball has reach- 
ed the ground. 

Ruling: There is no infraction in (a), but, in (b), 
if it were intentional, it is a foul for illegal batting. 
If the action in (b) is judged to be accidental, there 
is no infi-action and the striking of the ball with the 
lower leg is ignored. 

19. Play: Snap is from A's 40. Backward pass by 
Al is batted forward from A's 30 by A2 so that it 
goes out-of-bounds on A's: (a) 35; or (b) 45. 

Ruling: Foul in both (a) and (b). Penalty, if 
accepted, is measured from A's 30. 

Sports Survey 

The National Federation recently com- 
pleted its biennial Sports Participation Sur- 
vey. Conclusions are both interesting and re- 
vealing. Although there were 80 less schools 
sponsoring interscholastic basketball, there 
were slightly over 100,000 more students 
participating in the sport than there were 
two years ago. School district consolidation 
is the reason for the slight decrease in the 
actual number of schools sponsoring basket- 
ball. The reason for the 16 2/3% increase 



in number of students competing in the 
sport, even with the consolidation of schools, 
is that many more schools now are sponsor- 
ing sophomore and freshman teams, as well 
as those on a junior varsity and varsity level. 
Cross-country has increased greatly in the 
past two years. 40% more schools are now 
sponsoring the sport, while there are 50% 
more boys taking part. Although there are 
only 405 more high schools sponsoring fooit- 
ball this year, the increase in the number of 
students taking part in the sport is slightly 
over 22*^;. There are 769,300 students who 
participate in interscholastic football. Golf, 
gymnastics, soccer, tennis, volleyball and 
wrestling all have shown from 20 to 25% 
increase in the number of schools including 
these sports in their program. Volleyball sta- 
tistics reveal that there has been an increase 
in two years of over 100 %> in the number of 
students taking part. Wrestling participation 
has increased as much as 50%. This accurate 
survey is definite proof of the extensive pro- 
grams that state associations promote for 
their member schools. The survey results 
dramatically disprove the contention of those 
uninformed critics that only a limited num- 
ber of boys are served by interscholastic 
athletic programs. 



TO THE K.H.S.A.A. 
AND TO THE 

ADMINISTRATORS, FACULTIES, AND 

ATHLETIC DEPARTMENTS OF 

OUR KENTUCKY SCHOOLS 

FOR YOUR EFFORTS 

ON BEHALF OF OUR CHILDREN 

WE SAY 

'Thanks and Best Wishes 
For A Successful Year/' 

KENTUCKY CENTRAL LIFE AND ACCIDENT INSURANCE COMPANY 



lUe Kifu^de^^ Co4nfia4Uf, 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. MoCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 2-8522 



FAIR - PLAY 
OUT IN FRONT FOR OVER 25 YEARS 

FAIR - PLAY 
FF-IS FIGURGRAM BOARD 

Here's the world's most popular basketball scoreboard — the 
FF-IS — with famous TICK-AWAY flashing numeral clock orie- 
inated by Fair-Play. Shows exact number of minutes and sec- 
onds remaining: in game. Accurate, dependable, and easily 
serviced. 

Sturdy, all-aluminum alloy cabinet, fully enclosed with no 
exposed wiring:. Non-grlare. baked enamel finish. Choice of 
colors: srray, red, green, blue and black with white lettering. 

IN STOCK 

We carry the Fignrgrsm basketball boards in stock for immed- 
iate delivery. Boards for other sports also available. Any 
board can be made special to order. 



Model Description Lbs. 

FF-lS-^ingle Face Tickaway with 9 inch numerals 125 S 

FF lS-12 — Single Face Tickaway with 12 inch numerals 150 

FF-IS-PF— Deluxe Tickaway with Player Name and Foul Panels 500 

(Add $72.00 if FF-IS is to have 12 inch numerals.) 

FF-2S — Double Face Tickaway with 9 inch numerals 250 

FF-2S-12— Double Face Tickaway with 12 inch numerals 300 

MULTIPLE INSTALLATIONS: When 2 or more boards are installed 
to be operated together, the price is the same as 2 or more single boards, 
less $30.00 if scoreboards are bought at the same time. 
No. 12PRL LINEUP PANELS lowerable and reversible with players names 
and numbers for 4 teams and next game panel. Numbers, letters, 

lowering system furnished 

No. 12PF PLAYER FOUL PANELS— Shows 5 fouls for 12 players 

each team, per tiair 

FPW FOUL INDICATOR or MATCH SCORE WRESTLING 

ATTACHMENT with control panel 



Price 
; 498.00 

570.00 
1,258.00 

899.00 
999.00 



.$165.00 
$595.00 
$195.00 



FB-50-A2 FOOTBALL SCOREBOARD 

This is THE scoreboard for high school or college football — 
the most popular football scoreboard made and the standard 
for fields and stadiums from Maine to California. 
This big FB-50-A2 is 18 feet long, 8 feet high, weight 600 
pounds. It's durable, too; an all-aluminum cabinet, fully en- 
closed for protection against weather, dust, vandalism. Beauti- 
ifully finished in white, forest green or signal black (special 
colors on request at extra cost). 

Big 24-inch flashing numerals show TIME. SCORE, PERIOD. 
DOWN and YARDS TO GO. Tickaway Clock shows the exact 
number of minutes and seconds left to play. 



Model 



Description 



Lbs. 



Both Day 

& Night 

$1,565.00 

1,650.00 

1,050.00 



Night Only 
Day Only 

FB-50-A2— 18 ft. X 7 ft. 2 inches— with 24-inch numbers 675 $1,485.00 

FB-50-S— 24 ft. X 8V2 ft— with 24-inch numbers 750 1,570.00 

FB-50-T— 18 ft. X 4 ft.— Top Section Only 500 995.00 

INSTALLATION EOUIPMENT 

CONTROL CABLE: From board to sideline and/or press box, 

19 conductor (for either underground or overhead installation) per foot .55 

Sideline DOWN & YARDS TO GO portable cable, per foot .20 

Sideline TIMERS portable cable, includes hand switch, per foot .20 

CONTROL RECEPTACLES AND BOX: (Minimum of one required) 

1. Press Box Type $20.00 

2. Sideline type (raintight with hasp) $25.00 

A special panel for Coca-Cola. Pepsi-Cola, Dr. Pepper, Ford, Chevrolet, Oldsmobile or any special design 
can be duplicated at an extra cost to fit on the bottom of either type board. 

All Fair Play boards carry a one-year ^rnarantee. We have all necessary repair parts in stock and 
also maintain an experienced 



Take advantage of the present day prices 
All prices subject to chancre without notice. 



nd pla 



your order 



for at 



future delivery. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 



CHapel 7- 1 94 1 



(Incorporated) 



MAYHELD, KENTUCKY 




High School AfMef e 

K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Goebel Ritter, R. 14; George Maines, R. 9; Jack Wise, R. 10; 
Howard Gardner, R. 6; Roy Settle, R. 3; Bill Nau, R. 13. Second Row: Charlie Vettiner, School 
Director; Evan Settle, R. 8;Briscoe Inman, R. 12; Turner EIrod, R. 5; Ernie Chattin, R. 16; 
Harry Stephenson, R. 11. Third Row: Jerry Kimmel, R. 4; Rex Alexander, R. 1; Claude Ricketts, 
R. 7; Charles Irwin, R. 2; Dick Looney, R. 15. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

DCTDBER - IBBZ 





National Federation Annual Meeting 

The 43rd annual meeting of the National Federa- 
tion of State High School Athletic Associations was 
held at the Bessborough Hotel, Saskatoon, Saskatche- 
wan, Canada, on July 1-4, 1962. Thirty-nine State 
Associations, in addition to the affiliate Association 
of Manitoba, and Saskatchewan, Canada, were rep- 
resented. Fifty-eight State Executive Officers or 
Assistant Executive Officers, 54 State Association 
Board of Control Officers and 67 additional Board 
Members attended. Several national associations, in- 
cluding the National Association of Intercollegiate 
Athletics, the Amateur Athletic Union, the National 
Collegiate Athletic Association, the National Associa- 
ton of Secondary-School Principals, the National 
Forensic League, National Science Fairs, the National 

University Extension Association, the Division for 
Girls' and Women's Sports, the Iowa Girls' High 
School Athletic Union and the United States Volley- 
ball Association, were also represented. The total 
individual attendance was 561. 

The K.H.S.A.A. was represented by President K. 
G. Gillaspie; Vice-President Cecil A. Thornton; Direc- 
tors Robert P. Forsythe, Don R. Rawlings, and Oran 
C. Teater, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. M-ans- 
field. 

GENERAL SESSIONS were held on Sunday and 
Monday evenings. Combined sessions of the Board of 
Control and Executive Officers met on Monday and 
Wednesday mornings. On Monday afteroon, the Board 
of Control members and Executive Officers met in 
separate sessions. Tuesday morning the Non-Athletic 
Group met independently, as did those particularly 
interested in athletic game rules and committee re- 
ports. Wednesday afternoon, five workshop sessions, 
grouped on the basis of interest, met simultaneously. 
Tuesday evening was devoted to an unusually fine 
banquet, generously provided through the courtesy 
of the Province of Saskatchewan. An important fea- 
ture of the banquet program was a presentation of 
National Federation citations to four very desei-ving 
recipients. The gentlemen honored were: F. T. 
DOBBS (Alabania); WILLARD B. KNOWLES (Cali- 
fornia and Past-President of the National Federa- 
tion); JONATHAN LOWE (West Virginia); and 
WILLIAM L. OSTEEN (Tennessee). The citations 
were presented by National Federation Vice-Presi- 
dent JOHN V. BERNARD (Section 6), with a com- 
mittee giving assistance. Immediately following the 
dinner and, as part of the banquet program, M. F. 
SPRUNGLR (Illinois) presented a most appropriate 
and digfiified memorial in respect for I*'RLD L. 
BlESTiiR, LEO J. CONSTELLO, DAVE E. PHIL- 
LIPS, THEOjjORE F. SUNDQUIST and WALTER 
A. TORGERSOxV, each of whom had passed away dur- 
ing the past year. Wednesday evening, the 43rd 
Annual Business Meeting of the National Council 
was conducted. Complete minutes of National Council 
activity are a part of these proceedings. 

The principal address at the opening General 
Session was given by Commissioner WIJjLIAM R. 
KJi,i,jj, ol tne Western Intercollegiate Conference. 
Mr. Reea was introduced by his neighbor, ALBERT 
WILLIS, Executive Secretary of the Illinois High 
School Association. Mr. Willis told of the speaker's 
background and training and reviewed the qualifica- 
tions which enable Mr. Reed to speak with particular 
authority relative to the place of athletics in the 
program of educational institutions. Mr. Reed's 
thought provoking presentation, "The Pui'suit of Ex- 
cellence," called the delegate's attention to the fact 



that the recent emphasis on excellence in learning 
has made it possible to narrow the objectives of educa- 
tion. It has provided an opportunity for the critics 
of the athletic programs sponsored by educational 
institutions to broadcast the mistaken idea that sports 
necessarily must interfere with the "pursuit of ex- 
cellence" in academic areas. Mr. Reed vigorously de- 
nounced this point of view. He defended the contribu- 
tion which interscholastic and intercollegiate athletics 
make to the education of participants. That sports 
do contribute to education is historically true and 
it is no less true today than it was before the in- 
creased emphasis in specified academic areas. The 
speaker contended "that those of us who are engaged 
in sports believe that sports make a positive contribu- 
tion to the education of boys and girls. We must take 
to the American public, affirmatively and agressively, 
the truth that sports teach us those qualities of spirit 
which are as vital to oui' future as the next anti- 
missile." Mr. Reed presented his poir.t-of-view in a 
scholarly and forceful manner. His challenging ad- 
dress was most enthusiastically accepted by the 
large audience. 

K.H.S.A.A. Assistant Commissioner J. B. MANS- 
FIELD, ALLEN W. BUSH (Michigan), and HER- 
MAN F. KELLER (Indiana) in a workshop session 
on Development of Competent Officials gave re- 
ports on procedures followed in their states for train- 
ing athletic officials. It was agreed, poor officiating 
make for a poor contest, regardless of playing abili- 
ties. Therefore ,it is necessary to continually strive to 
upgrade the quality of officiating. Improvement in this 
area will reflect improved play, too. All were agreed 
that there are no substitutes for proper and adequate 
study of the game rules and the mechanics of good 
officiating. Some states sponsor schools or clinics at 
which officials actually demonstrate their ability 
in game situations and are corrected and graded on 
the basis of their performance. Most state associations 
believe the practical demonstration work can best 
be handled by local officials' associations. The state 
association office should keep a close liaison with 
these local organizations, even to furnishing the 
material to be covered during the course. State as- 
sociations provide for rules meetings in various 
sports and these are held in strategically located 
centers which the officials and coaches can reach 
conveniently. It is believed by many that one inter- 
preter can do a better job in handling all meetings 
in the state than to have several men splitting up the 
meetings because of uniform interpretation will be 
made. Others prefer a system which has several inter- 
preters visiting different sites. Both plans are em- 
ployed and each has proven to be practical and very 
workable. 

The general. Board of Control and Executive 
Officers' sessions held during the meeting included 
the following topics; The President's Physical Fit- 
ness Program, Medical Aspects of Athletics, All- 
Star Committee Action, Comprehensive Program to 
Enhance the Educational Values of Interscholastic 
Athletics, Services to Officials, Relationships with 
Agencies and Groups, Promotions-Our Position, As 
We See Athletic Competition, Relationships with 
State Legislatures, Athletic Insurance-Whose Re- 
sponsibility?, Athletics in Education, The Sports Fed- 
eration Program, Committee Reports, 'Tooth and 
Mouth Protectors Save Teeth, Are Regulations Nec- 
essary Today?, Amateur and Award Rules for State 
Association, Development of Competent Officials, 
State Association Publications, Why Sports Seasons, 

William M. Runyon, Director, Official Sports 
Film Service, was in charge of a preview showing_ of 
the new film. Official Bageball, during the Opening 
General Session, 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ, of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXV— NO. 3 



OCTOBER, 1962 



..00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They ;are interpretations on some 
of the early season situations which have been pre- 
sented. 

20. Play: Player Al has broken: (a) chin strap; 
or (b) shoestring; or (c) mouthpiece; or (d) face bar, 
and coaoh or trainer or substitute in coaching box 
tosses replacement equipment to Al on the field or 
hands it to Al who has come to sideline. The neces- 
sary exchange or repair is made by player Al with 
or wihtout help from an official or a teammate play- 
er on the field. 

Ruling: It is no(t interpreted as assistance by "a 
team attendant" in any of the situations in (a), (b), 
(c) or (d). 

Comment: Assistance by a team attendant is 
attributed to be actual help, such as fastening, lacing 
or fitting. Tossing a piece of equipment onto the field 
or even carrying it onto tlie field and handing it to a 
player is not interpreted to be assistance by team 
attendant. 

21. Play: Substitute A12 comes onto the field and 
replaces All. Substitute A13 carries with him a piece 
of equipment for the purpose of replacing equipment 
of Al. After A12 becomes a player he assists Al in 
making the repair, which is done within 25 seconds. 

Ruling: There is no violation when A12 carries 
the equipment onto the field and he is not considered 
a team attendant when, after becoming a player, he 
gives assisltance to Al. 

22. Play: One of the low-cut shoes worn by Al 
slips oiEf during or between plays in late stage of 
game. Circumstances are sudh that it appears that 
shoe is being intentionally dislodged for purpose of 
stopping clock. 

Ruling: The clock should be stopped for an of- 
ficial's time-out. If official is certain that shoe is 
being dislodged or that other tactics are inltentionally 
used to stop clock for the pui-pose of consuming time, 
the official or officials, after they are positive of the 
abuse, may order clock to be started immediately. If 
the official is certain the act is intentional he is au- 
thorized to interpret it as delay of game under 3-6-2 
and penalize 5 yards. It must be emphasized that there 
should be no question of doubt before a team is de- 
nied the privilege of an official's time-out for Hie 
repair of faulty equipment. 

23. Play: After 22 seconds of ready-for-play 
time has elapsed, player Al calls official's attention 
to equipment in need of repair. The official stops 
clock. The time-out is charged to the official. The 
equipment is repaired without assis'^nce and Al is 
ready to proceed 23 second's after clock has been stop- 
ped. Then official starts clock and team A uses 25 
seconds in which to put ball in play. 

Ruling: There has been no infraction. 

24. Play: Al calls official's attention to equip- 
ment in need of repair. The time-out is granted and 



official charges it to himself. After approximately 22 
seconds of official's time-out, captain of team A, 
seeing that the equipment of player Al cannot be 
con'eeted before official's time-out expires, requests 
a charged time-out for his team. 

Ruling: The official will grant the time-out and 
charge it to A. It shall not exceed two minutes. 30 
seconds before the charged time-out expires, referee 
shall notify the teams and he shall declare the ball 
ready-for-play 25 seconds before time-out expires. 
The clock will not be ranning during the 25 seconds 
of ready-for-play period because it is part of the 
charged time-out. In other words, after a minute and 
35 seconds of the charged time-out have expired, the 
ready-for-play signal is given and the 25-second count 
begins. 

25. Play: K2 is on his knee in position to hold 
ball for kick during try-for-point. Snap is so high 
that K2 must rise from his knee and stand on his feet 
to caitch it. After catching the snap, K2 drops to a 
position with his knee again on the ground and ball 
is then kicked by Kl. 

Ruling: Legal. Nothing has happened to cause 
ball to become dead. 

26. Play: Backfield men, Kl and K2, stand up- 
right at snap which is caught by Kl, who then drops 
to ground and, with one knee on ground, holds ball 
while K2 attempts a placekick. 

Ruling: Legal. 

27. Play: During a try-for-point, Kl assumes a 
position as if he were to receive a snap and hold ball 
for a place-kick attempt by his teammate, K2. That 
is, Kl has his knee on the ground and his hands ex- 
tended as if snap were to come to him. However, 
snap goes directly to K2, who is standing in an upright 
position and K2 then forward passes while Kl either 
rises to block or remains in a kneeling position. 

Ruling: Legal. 

28 Play: 1st, 2nd, or 3rd down scrimmiage-kick 
by team A from its own 40 yardline goes ouit-of- 
bounds on A's 35 yardline before crossing line of 
scrimmage: (a) as a result of a high wind; or (b) 
after being partially blocked. 

Ruling: R's ball at the inbounds spot in both (a) 
and (b). 

29. Play: The defense has only 10 players on the 
field and Bll enters during the down. He participates 
by blocking or tackling. 

Ruling: It is always an illegal substitution be- 
cause Bll entered the field during a live ball. It may 
be, and in many cases woud also be, judged an unfair 
act. If the an-ival of Bll on the field of play during 
the live ball was the result of poor timing, it would 
probably be judged illegal substitution only; but, if 
the enlti-y of Bll on the field during the live ball was 
for the express purpose of preventing a score or pre- 
venting a substantial gain, it is unquestionably an 
unfair act. In any event, it cannot be illegal partici- 
(Oonltinued on Page PMve) 



Page Two THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1962 

OCTOBER, 1962 VOL. XXV— N0.3 reg-ional, as follows: Pour or less, one team; five to 

seven, two teams; eight to ten, three teams, eleven 

Pablished monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky ^^ thirteen, four teams; fourteen or more, five teams, 

High School Athletic Association ~i. j?- i J ■ j -j i i i,- • i ii l i- t-i j; 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. ^ne iirst ten mdiviQuals to fmish Will be eligible for 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, the state meet regardless of their team position. 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

!^s!s[an-t--rduoVv:::::::::::::::::::::__''^^''i.^^ new board member 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown 

Vice-President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan 

Directors — Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman 
Gish (1962-63), Greenville; Preston Holland (1961-65), Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-65), Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1962- 
66). Louisville: Oran C. Teater (1960-64), Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



■mllom the Comtnlssionei s (Jffi 



tee 



Employment Bureaus 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials have 
been established. Eacdi registered official shoul(i file 
at once with his bureau head and/or the nearest 
bureau head his schedule of games and a list of dates 
on which the official will be available to call games. 
The names of the bui'eau heads, with the residence 
and business phone numbers (residence numbers 
given first), are as follows: 

Region 1. Rex Alevander, 1320 Wells Blvd., Mm-- 
ray, PL 3-3579, PL 3-2310 Ext. 285 

Region 2. Charles Irwin, Route 1, Hopkinsville, 
TU 6-4820, TU 6-4820 

Region 3. Roy Settle, 1618 Sioux PL, Owensboro, 
MU 3-2136, MU 3-3571 

Region 4. Jerry Kimmel, Beechmont, GR 6-2656 
Drakesboro 

Region 5. Turner Elrod, 332 Sumpter Avenue, 
Bowling Green, VI 2-5110, VI 2-0341 

Region 6. Howard Gardner, McCollum Avenue, 
Elizabethtown, RO 5-6273, 765-6273 

Region 7. Claude Ricketts, 10005 Third Street, 
Valley Station, WE 7-8610, ME 4-1551 Exit. 220 

Region 8. Elmo Head, 113 Alton Road, Shelby- 
ville, -ME 3-4220, ME 3-1750 

Region 9. John Sohaar, Bellevue Hig'h School, 
Bellevue, CO 1-5069, CO 1-2980 

Region 10. Jack Wise, 408 Fountain, Georgetown, 
2052, 120 

Region 11. Harry Stephenson, 2210 Circle Drive, 
Lexington, 4-9620, 5-2960 Ext. 283 

Region 12. Briscoe Inman, Centre College, Dan- 
ville, 236-5740, 236-5211 Ext. 26 

Region 13. Bill Nau, P. 0. Box 209, Barbourville, 
6-4112, 6-3057 

Region 14. Goebel Ritter, Chiarch Street, Whites- 
burg, 633-7164, 633-2339 

Region 15. Dick Looney, 1121 Myra Barnes 
Avenue, PikeviUe, GE 7-6410, GE 7-6410 

Region 16. Ernie Chattin, 2147 Central Avenue, 
AshJana, 324-2665, 324-6191 

The Cross Country Run 

The K.H.S.A.A. will attempt to set up eight 
regional cross country meets, scheduled to be held 
on Saturday, October 27, 1962. The sites are Paducah, 
Bowling (jreen, Clarkson, Bardstown, Louisville, 
Bellevue, Lexington and Paintsville. Entry blanks will 
be sent to the principals of all member schools who 
have indicated that they plan to sponsor cross country 
teams this year. Tlie steta cross country run is 
scheduled to be held in Lexington on November 10. 

Representation at the state meet will be deter- 
mined by the number of teams competing in the 




Sherman Gish 

Sherman Gish, Superintendent of Muhl- 
enberg County Schools, is a new member of 
the K.H.S.A.A. Board of Control. He will 
serve until next June 30, filling out the un- 
expired term of Supt. Robert P. Forsythe of 
the Caldwell County Schools, who moved out 
of Section 2 on July 1. 

The new Board member, a graduate of 
Bremen High School in Muhlenberg County, 
holds an A.B. and M.A. degree from Western 
Kentucky. He was married to the former 
Ruby Mae Miller. They have one son, Ray- 
mon "Rip" Gish, a former basketball star at 
Western Kentucky, who is now with tihe 
Phillips Petroleum Company after playing 
for the Marines two years. 

Sherman Gish has been in the Muhlen- 
berg County school system for the past 
thirty-five years in various positions, teach- 
er, coach, principal and superintendent. He 
is a member of the Bethlehem Baptist 
Church, the Third District Kentucky Educa- 
tional Association, the National Education 
Association, and the state and national as- 
sociations of school administrators. 



Kentucky Cheerleader Camp 

"Clap your hands. Stomp /our feet! 
Our great team can't be beat!" 
This wias only one of the many cheers whioh rang 
out at Camp Daniel Boone this past summer during 
the Kentucky Cheerleader Camp. Two sessions were 
held during the August 5-13 period for approximately 
200 high school Cheerleaders from Ohio, Pennsylvania, 
West Virginia, and Kentucky. The camp was under 
the direction of Stella S. Gilb, University of Kentucky; 
Grace Fragstein, Lafayette High School; and Millie 
Rhodes, Transylvania College. The instructional staff 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1962 



Page Three 



was composed of college students trained by Mr. 
Lawrence Herkimer of Dallas, Texas, one of the fore- 
most authorities in the field of cheerleading. 

Each morning the campers attended classes where 
cheers, chants, songs, pom-pom routines, and cal- 
isthenics were learned. Afternoon sessions included 
discussions on effective pep rallies, sportsmanship, 
controlling ithe crowd, and general tips on cheering 
such as cheering techniques, grooming, uniforms, pos- 
ture, personality, conduct, and proper health habits. 
Evening sessions included team and individual com- 
petitions with one evenings's program containing 
skits suitable for pep rallies. Summaries and evalua- 
tions of all these activities were recorded by the 
cheerleaders in notebooks which will prove invaluable 
during the coming school year. 

And all of the hard work was rewarded. Each 
noon, ribbons and recognitions were given to out- 
standing teams and individuals. These awards were 
for cheering, cabin inspection, and notebooks. At the 
end of camp, trophies were awarded for the out- 
standing teams. The first week's winner was Henry 
Clay High School, Lexingiton, and the second week's 
winner was Ashland High School, Ashland, Congratu- 
lations to two fine teams! 

Of the many values received by the participants, 
perhaps the most important one was that of making 
cheerleading a prominent and useful part of the 
athletic program. By having better cheerleading stand- 
ards, the quality of cheerleading will be improved. 
Also, many lasting friendships were formed through 
camp experiences. Many schools which were once 
arch rivals now are linked by a friendship stemming 
from KCC. A feeling of kinship among Kentucky 
high schools exists, thus creating, indirectly, a feel- 
ing of good sportsmanship before the schools meet 
in an athletic event. 

In speaking as a cheerleader sponsor, I heaitily 
recommend KCC for all Kentucky Cheerleaders and 
sponsors. I took seven individuals to camp, but when 
we returned to Frankfort I had a team trained in 
precision dheering, full of pep and enthusiasm, with 
many clever ideas for the coming year! 

And what were our comments as we drove away 
from KCC? "Let's start making our plans for next 
year!" 

Mrs. Herbert Weddingiton, Vice-President, K.A.P. 
O.S., Franklin County High School, Frankfort, Ken- 
tucky. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Anderson, Lester W., 206 Blankenbaker Lane, Louisville, TW 

3-3470 
Baker, Charles J., 2547 Harrison, Paducah, 443-3043 
Brown, John W., 975 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 2-0964, 2-3212 
Buchholz, William J., 9416 Gordon Drive, Jeffersontown, 267- 

7519, JU 3-6651 
Campbell, John J., 1400 Hillcrest, Fulton, 1773, 130 
Cathey, Gene S., 1415 Vine, Murray, PL 3-5367, PL 3-3245 
Cook, Jack W., 156 South Edgemont Ed., Huntington, W. Va. 
Corrao, Philip J., 2321 Coyle Drive, New Albany, Indiana, WH 

4-9990, WH 4-8454 
Coulter, William, 807 Taylor Ave., Evansville 13, Indiana, 

HA 3-7510 
Craft, Bill, 140 Vanderbilt, Lexington, 7-4843, 4-9223 
Fernandez, John W., Jr., Route No. 2, Lexington, 7-4367, 2-1497 
Fish, Leiand Gilbert, 826 Oakhill Drive, Lexington, 3-0569, 

2-7847 
Fishback, Glen W., 3504 St. Edwards, Jeffersontown, AN 

7-7633 TW 5-3452 
Foster, Clifford W., 7840 B Estrada, Ft. Knox, 4-5076, 4-5710 
Fucci, Dom, 752 Wellington Way, Lexington, 7-6327, 2-4091 
Gillespie, Robert C, No. 8 Wilana Court, Pikeville, 7-7934, 

7-7190 
Grace, Chalres K., Cypress St., Pineville, 337-3331, 337-2348 



Grieco, Joseph R., 2703 Shaffer Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 661-3346 
Griggs, John M. 615 Freeman Drive, Lexington, 2-7989 2-7989 
Harris Russell, 368 Boiling Springs, Lexington, 4-6625 
Hatfield. Gene Edwin, Country Club Court, Fulton 1274 

Paducah 443-4508 
Hendon. L. J., 106 South 12th St., Murray, PL 3-3668. PL 

Horton, Aldrich L., Box 47, Greenville, 1004 

Hughes, Robert E,, 400 Briggs, Russellville, PA 6-6334, PA 

6-6336 
Kallaher, James E., 1703 Deerwood, Louisville, GL 1-5491, GL 

Liebert, Gilbert F., 230 Clover Lane, Louisville, TW 5-2216 

JU 7-1121 ext. 438 ' 

Lutz Charles J-., 2706 South 6th St., Ironton, Ohio, 532-6237, 

Ashland 324-1156 
McGIasson Eugene M., 1800 Brentmoor Lane, Anchorage, 425- 

4do4, 4iiD-4D54 
McLaughlin, Michael, 1029 Quincy St., Parkersburg, W. Va. 

6-mf ' hH 3311°" ^' ^"'^'^'''^' Evansville, Indiana, GR 
Mattingly. Charles C. 1028 Sylvia, Louisville, ME 6-3137 
Morse. Richard K., 163 No. Deepwood, Radcliff, 361-3748, Ft 

Knox 4-4454 

M^S '^F?'1i.y,",^-?."l"S'-*^'^y- Lexington, 5-0772. 5-0772 
Mudd Ed, 3512 Mildred Drive, Louisville 16, SP 6-6888 

683-'l7^3° '^■' "'"'■■ ^^^ McCready, Louisvivlle, TW 7-2277, 
^'^isbS ^'^''"'' ^■' ^^^* °''''' ■^°'' ^^^' ^^"^^^ 98«-34*6. 623- 
^'''''ropolS"'lll°"6602 ^""^ ^™'"'' ^*"' P^'^"'=^''' 444-6095, Met- 
Noland. Douglas, 306 Herndon, Stanford, 365-2609, 365-2619 
Parker, Billy E., Box 731, Pineville, 337-3293 
Pickett, Robert S., HI 2nd St. Greensburg, 932-5421, 932-5231 
R?W w n?''" w- 'IL^,S?"'^' Lexington, 4-1213. 2-3255 
Riley, Wilham W., 702 Chestnut St.. Kenova. W. Va. 
Rn".?;, r "IJf "•• 244 Glendale Ave., Lexington, 2-6511, 5-2110 

ME 6-M26 ■ ■^ °'"' ^'"'- Louisville 17, ME 5-7426. 

St Clair James W., 1500 5th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 

'^'wk'4-V467;- ME 7-1726''"'"^ ^^^'^^ ^^" ^""'"^' ^'"'-"''- 
Showalter, John, Georgetown, 662 1240 

^'""mf' 7 ^^^'^ ?-o.P'' ^°^'"' I'"^^' Louisville, 969-7925, 
mti 7-7621, ext. 247 

^""^ EM ^''8745 "'" ^^°* Fai-mview Ave., Louisville, GL 8-1286, 

^'°l:o^i'°HA 6?l31i°^' ^'" ^"^'^ ^™"^""^' ^"^--- «« 

Tackett, Jay, Route No. 3, Georgetown, 6663, 6653 

Tarter, Edward E., 271 Eldorado Ave., Louisville 18, 458-3606 

Tharpe, Robert L 212 Spruce, Murray, PL 3-4671, PL 3-9174 

Tucker, William R.. 27 Lisle Lane, Winchester 

Vaughan, Dick, 3137 Powell, Ashland, 324-5076. 324-5155 

Venek^ase^^Kenneth^ H., 3424 Hycliffe, Louisville, TW 6-8392, 

^'^''4-2947^°''^'^ ^■' ^^°^'° Paquette St., Ft. Knox, 4-5107. 
^'''4-9895""''" ^■' ^""^ ^"" '" °^'* ^°^'^' Lexington. 7-7269, 
Wheeler, Mellington, 1909 Chestnut, Kenova, W. Va 

7910' ""^^ ^" ^^^^ Adams St.. Ashland. 326-2733. 324- 
^" TW "e^Mlf °''^' ^^^ ^''''^ ^""^ ^*- Louisville 6, JU 5-4591. 
Wise. Billy v., 2112 St. Teresa, Lexington, 6-7449. 2-0410 
Wise, Jack, 408 Fountain, Georgetown, 2052, 120 
Wood, Paul, 219 South 4th St., Danville, 236-4685, Frankfort, 

CA 7-4531 ext. 361 



KAPOS News 

NOTICE TO PRINCIPALS AND 
CHEERLEADER SPONSORS 

Dear Principal: 

Behind every good cheerleading squad is a good 
cheerleader sponsor. For some time the Executive 
Board of K. A. P. 0. S. has felt the need for a clinic 
juat for sponsors. Our past clinics have been geared 
to the needs of the cheerleader. Since we were not 
able to obtain a capable person to conduct this year's 
cheerleader clinic, it seemed a blessing in disguise. 
And now we are proud to announce the first KAPOS 
Clinic for Sponsors. 

The clinic will be held on October 27 at the 
Lafayette Hotel in Lexington, Kentucky. The morning 
session will start at 10:30 ajm. and continue until 
12:30 p.m. at which time we will have lunch. The 
price of the luncheon will be $2.00. The afternoon 
session will end at 3:00 p.m. sharp. This plan will give 
(Continued on Page Five) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1962 



The Flying Dutchman 





As you read this copy, your Dutch Re- 
porter will be on his twenty-first consecu- 
tive tour of Kentucky, conducting the an- 
nual basketball clinics. This is always a 
sentimental journey. Memories are relived 
at every town. 

There was 1942 when my 1939 Chevy 
was towed off Ashland's streets by the 
Police. I told the Chief that I knew Ernie 
Chattin, but he still thought it would be nice 
if I paid the fine. 

Then there was 1946 when Coach Earle 
Jones could find only one meeting place for 
the officials — Maysville's City Jail. Imagine 
the propriety of Kentucky's officials sitting 
in the "Jail House" in their striped shirts, 
studying the laws of the game. 

It must have been 1950 when Coach Ed 
Diddle went to sleep as the Bowling Green 
session started, waked up as the fellows were 
leaving and said, "I really enjoyed this 
clinic." Kelly Thompson was there that 
night. 

1958 was a good year. That was the first 
anniversary of the annual custom, inaugurat- 
ed by Somerset's Athletic Director Bill Clark, 
of serving steak dinners to The Dutchman's 
Party prior to the clinic. We recommend this 
practice on a state-wide basis. 

1960 was the year when South Ports- 
mouth's colorful Foster "Sid" Meade estab- 
lished a clinic record by showing up at three 
(3) different Kentucky cities to leaim the 
rules. For all Kentuckians who have argued 
since last March about whether Sid was rigiht 
or wrong in calling that technical foul when 
the fan came out to visit him on the floor 
during the 1962 State Tournament, here is 



The Dutchman's ruling, "Sid was absolutely 
correct." 

So now it is 1962 and more memories 
will be painted into the clinic tour picture, 
new friends will be added, arguments will be 
settled, and new officials initiated into the 
"Fraternity of Whistlers." These new wihdst- 
lers should take a lesson from the turtle. He 
sticks his neck out if he wants to get any- 
where. 

The Game Guy Program of the K.H.S. 
A.A. has been heralded in national publica- 
tions from coast to coast, emphasizing the 
interest the Association takes in physically- 
handicapped young men and women. Which 
handicapped youngster are you helping this 
year? 

These kids want an adult friend and ad- 
visor as is evidenced by a crippled lad who 
writes, "How can I be a He-Man?" In the 
humble opinion of The Dutchman, there are 
more "He-Men" among the handicapped 
than anywhere else — ^but since this young 
fighter wants an answer, here it is: 

(1) Fight for right against wrong re- 
gardless of the number of times you get 
clobbered. 

(2) Take the good and bad breaks with- 
out getting big-headed or feeling sorry for 
yourself. 

(3) Live your life so that if death comes 
a second from now you can meet the "Man 
Upstairs" proudly and without fear. 

Mrs. Thomas E. Gish, better known to 
everybody in Whitesburg as "Pat," gets the 
Corn Cob Pipe of Honor Award for this 
month. "Pat" Gish is one of the "spark 
plugs" of The Mountain Eagle. Her unsel- 
fish efforts to get playground equipment for 
the children of Whitesburg, plus her inter- 
est in the development of a wholesome rec- 
reation program for this mountain city, won 
her the coveted award. 

If you want to see real recreational 
progress in the heart of Kentucky's moun- 
tains, keep your eye on Whitesburg whei-e 
the Cloud City Recreational Resort will soon 
take form a few miles out of town. This pro- 
ject is a tribute to the people who have work- 
ed hard to set an example, which all com- 
munities should pattern from. 

The Dutchman's offices have been mov- 
ed to The Health Building, 620 South Third 
Street, Louisville 2, Kentucky, while the 
Armory is being remodeled. Send your 
recommendations for the Cob Award, Abou 
Pen Adhem Award, or Game Guy Award to 
that address. The telephone numbers are 
JU 3-2618 and JU 4-2338. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1962 



Page Five 



K. A. P. 0. S. NEWS 

(Continued from Page Three) 

us enough time for our clinic, and since the meeting 

will be held downtown, it should allow some time for 

shopping. 

PRINCIPALS we urge you to back your sponsor. 
They serve your school in such needed capacities as 
chaperones, guides, disciplinarians, counselors, pro- 
gram sellers, etc. The $2.00 dues which your school 
pays to belong to KAPOS come bacli to you many- 
fold. URGE your sponsor to attend the clinic and fi- 
nance and support her. It will result in better rela- 
tions with other schools belonging to KAPOS and in 
over-all cheerleader responsibility. 

I eagerly look forward to seeing your sponsor 
at the Sponsors' Clinic on October 27. This is an op- 
portunity to share problems and ideas with other 
sponsors and should prove worthy of any sponsor's 
time. 

Sincerely your President, 
Ruth Combs Spurlock (Mrs. George B.) 
Madison Senior High School 
Richmond, Kentucky 

SPONSORS, you should be receiving a more de- 
tailed letter concerning the clinic and how to pay 
your dues. Check often with your principal concerning 
this detailed letter. 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
pation because only a player (not a substitute) can 
participate illegally. 

30. Play: Ihe defense has only 10 players on the 
feild. A substitute, Bll, enters during the down. He 
does not participate by blocking or tackling. 

Ruling: Illegal substitution. 5-yard penalty. Spot 
of foul is considered to be previous spot. 

31. Play: Bl, in his end zone, intercepts a for- 
ward pass. He tilien fumbles and the fumble is recover- 
ed by Al in the end zone. 

Ruling: Touchdown. 

32. Play: 7 B players line up within five yards 
of their free-kick line for a k-ick-off. At the time the 
ball is actually kicked, five B players are within five 
yards of their line, bult two of the B players have 
retreated so thait they are straddling their 45 yardline. 

Ruling: There has been no infraction. 

33. Play: Is the "forearm lift" used defensively, 
legal ? 

Ruling: An interpretation of a rule cannot be 
made on the basis of a term or a name used to desig- 
nate a general type of adtion. A "forearm lift" may 
and can be legal. If the defensive player's hand and 
wrist are in advance of his elbow at the time of con- 
tact and if the contact is of a lifting or pushing ac- 
tion, there is no infraction. However, all too often, 
action designated as a "forearm lift" is illegal. In 
many situations, and perhaps most of them, it is a 
blow or striking motion in which the forearm is 
used to "belt" the offensive player across the upper 
part of bis body. The rules specifically provide that 
a player may not strike an opponent and this includ- 
es the use of the forearm for this purpose, as well as 
the elbow, fist or locked hands. This provision must 
apply to the so-called "forearm lift," as well as to 
other actions. A blow delivered with the forearm is 
illegal, even though it is in an upward direction. Un- 
fortunately, this illegal coaching technique has been 
taught and encouraged by a number of coaches with 
a national repdfcation. Because it has been generally 
ignored by officials at soime levels of play, it has been 
erroneously accepted by some intersoholastic officials 
as permissive activity, neither the letter nor the spirit 



of the rule pemiit action which is for the purpose of 
punishing, or hurting, or intimidating. Brutality must 
not be condoned in interscholastic play. The illegal 
maneuver is being specifically called to the attention 
of coaches and officials this year for the express pur- 
pose of stopping the abuse. The practice of striking 
an opponent with a forearm is vicious, it injm-es and 
punishes boys, it brings discredit to a fine game, and 
it must not be tolerated. 

34. Play: Team A comes on the field with its 
Imemen equipped with forearm pads of soft rubber. 

Ruling: It is necessary for the umpire to examine 
equipment of this type closely to determine its legal- 
ity. The pad itself is not illegal if it is made entirely 
of soft rybber and/or cloth. The wearing of forearm 
pads by players when there is no evidence of injuries 
is a sus)picious situation. The use of an uninjured 
forearm in a legal manner, for blocking or for de- 
fensive purposes, will not necessitate the wearing of 
such pads. Tihe usual purpose of wearing a pad is to 
proteccit the wearer when he delivers an illegal type 
blow. The additional protection is most frequently 
needed when an arm is used in a "sti-iking manner." 
Officials musit be ever alert to illegal techniques 
when this equipment is worn and the players who 
use it illegally siliould be penalized promptly and con- 
sistently. 

35. Play: Rl, on his 12 or 15 yardline, gives a 
valid signal for a fair catch but, without attempting 
to make the catch, permits the ball to fall to the 
ground and it then rolls into his end zone for touoh- 
back. 

Ruling: There is no infraction. The rules do not 
require that an attempt to make a fan- catclh be made 
when a member of the receiving team gives a valid 
siignal. There is no reference in the rule, nor unplica- 
tion, that a signaler or any of his teammates must 
make an attempt to catch kick. Present rules cover- 
age pennits the receiving team to adjust to a situation 
wnich may change during a down. The course of 
events after a fair-catch signal has been given, may 
make it desirable for the signaler or one of his te'am- 
mates to change his mind and let the ball fall to the 
ground. The rules coverage does not require official 
to judge tIhe intention of a player who makes a fair 
catch signal. Neither does it handicap the kicking 
team, for its players can be as close to the receiver as 
they desire to be, so long as they do not interfere 
in any way with an opportunity to make a fair catch 
whether or not a signal has been given. 

36. Play: During a run for a touchdown by Al, 
time for the second quarter expires. At approximately 
the same time the ball enters the plane of the goal 
line, A2 clips. 

Ruling: The official must determine, wheither the 
foul occurred before or after the touchdown. A com- 
petent official will never consider a foul to be simul- 
taneous with the touchdown. The act of the ball enter- 
ing the plane of 'tilie goial line is instantaneous. If the 
foul is judged to have occmred before the touchdown, 
it is penalized as a live ball foiul. If the official's 
judgement is that the foul occuri'ed after the ball enter- 
ed plane of the goal line it is dead ball foul, in which 
case penalty would be administered on the succeeding 
kick-off at start of 2nd half. 

37. Play: Do the rules require that a player 
grasip his jersey while blocking if the player's hand 
or arm is in contact with the opponent? 

Ruling: The rules are silent on the matter of a 
blocking player grasping his jersey while blocking 
with his forearm and shoulder. The rules do not re- 
quire that the jersey be grasped nor do they pro- 
hibit a player from grasping his own jersey. Because 
the rules require that the hand shall be in contact 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1962 



with the blockei-'s body if such hand or arm is in 
contact with the opponent, some coaches believe that 
they can be assured that their players will have tiheir 
hands against their own body while blocking if they 
require the players to grasp their own jersey. If the 
jersey is somewhat loose and a player pulls his hands 
away from his body while they are holding onto the 
jersey, he can still be in violation of the rule because 
his hand would not be touching his body while he was 
blocking with hand or forearm. 

K.H.S.A.A. Football Schools 



Bowling Gn 
Hiseville 
Covington 
Hopkinsville 



(Asterisks Indicate 8-1 



SCHOOL 

Anderson 

Aquinas Prep. 

Ashland 

Atherton 

Attucks 

Austin Tracy* 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bate 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Bishop David Mem. 
Boone County 
Bourbon County 
Bowling Green 
Boyd County 
Bryan Station 
Buck horn 
Burgin* 
Butler 

Caldwell Co. 
Campbell Co. 
Campbellsville 
Camp Dick Robinson 
Carlisle 
CarroUton 
Catlettsburg 



Central 

Christian County 

Clark County 

Corbin 

Crittenden County 

Cumberland 

Danville 

Daviess County 

Dayton 

DeSales 

Dilce Combs 

Dixie Heights 

Douglass 

Douglass 

DuBois 

duPont Manual 

Durrett 

East Main 

Eastern 

Elizabethtown 

Eikhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 

Fairdale 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Fleming-Neon 

Fleming County 

Fort Campbell 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Fulton 

Gamaliel* 

Georgetown 

Glasgow 

Greensburg 

Hall 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henry Clay 

Highlands 



ADDRESS 

Lawrenceburg 
Louisville 
Ashland 
Louisville 
Hopkinsville 
Lucas 

Barbourville 
Bardstown 
Danville 
S. Ft. Mitchell 
Belfry 
Pineville 
Bellevue 
Berea 
Louisville 
Florence 
Paris 

Bowling Green 
Ashland 
Lexington 
Buckhorn 
Burgin 
Louisville 
Princeton 
Alexandria 
Campbellsville 
* Lancaster 
Carlisle 
CarroUton 
Catlettsburg 
Horse Cave 
Louisville 
Hopkinsville 
Winchester 
Corbin 
Marion 
Cumberland 
Danville 
Owensboro 
Dayton 
Louisville 
Jeff 

So. Ft. Mitchell 
Henderson 
Murray 
Mt. Sterling 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Lynch 
Middletown 
Elizabethtown 
Elkhom City 
Eminence 
Evarts 
Fairdale 
Fern Creek 
Louisville 
Fleming 
Flemingsburg 
Ft. Campbell 
Fort Knox 
Frankfort 
Frankfort 
Franklin 
Fulton 
Gamaliel 
Georgetown 
Glasgow 
Greensburg 
Grays Knob 
Harlan 
Cynthiana 
Harrodsburg 
Hazard 

East Bernstadt 
Henderson 
Henderson 
Lexington 
Fort Thomas 



Football School) 
COACH 

Henry Frazier 
W. H. Kleier 
Rex J. Miller 
Jack Kleier 
J. W. Armstrong 
Carroll Holmes 
Ray Canady 
Garnis Martin 
E. W. Broadus 
Gene Terry 
Albert Vipperman 
Cleo Pursifull 
Jim Jenkins 
Howard Foley 
Wally English 
John Dorman 
Eugene Correll 
Jim. Pickens 
Tom Scott 
Robert Cocanougher 
Harry Burton 
Robert J. Elder 
Milan Perpich 
Fred R. Clayton 
Claude Wilson 
Lawrence Gilbert 
Earl Shaw 
W. E. Leeiy 
James Yarbrough 
Eugene Foster 
James Robinson 
James D. White 
Charles Russell 
Charles Adams 
Ledger Howard 
Bill Huff 
Needham Saylcr 
Ray Callahan 
George Claiborne 
Tom Daley 
Gil Sturtzel 
C. A. Noble 
Dale Waite 
George K. M.:Gi'l 
J. L. Prew-tt 
Arthur Hawkins 
'i:om .larDcr 
Rex D. Slechter 
Edward Miracle 
Charles Herd 
Bill Hogg 
Jack Hall 

Charles Quertermou: 
Charles Hunter 
Robert Simpson 
Earl Browning 
Paul Miller 
Raymond luaacs 
J. R. S.iannon 
Marshall Parierso.n 
John Hackett 
O. C. Leathers 
Bob Bennett 
Bob Brown 
Chester Caddas 
Jerry Smailing 
Duke Owens 
James Poynt.:r 
Ivan Curnutte 
Robert Goforth 
Tom Ward 
Bill McKee 
W. E. Ellis 
Walt Green 
Hughes Benne.t 
William Dawson 
Mojo Hollowell 
Andy Hopkins 
Owen Hauck 



Lafayette 

Lancaster 

LaRue County 

Lebanon 

Leslie County 

Lily 

Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Lincoln Institute 

London 

Louisa 

Loyall 

Louisville Co. Day 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

McKell 

Madison 

Madisonville 

Male 

Mayfield 

M. C. Napier 

Mercer County 

Metcalfe County 

Middlesborough 

Millersburg Mill Inst. 

Morgan County 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon* 

Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholii 
North Hardin 



Barbourville 

Lexington 

Lancaster 

Hodgenvilie 

Lebanon 

Hyden 

Lily 

Franklin 

Paducah 

Lincoln Ridge 

Erl anger 

London 

Loyall 
Louisville 
Ludlow 
Corbin 

South Shore 

Richmond 

Madisonville 

Louisville 

Mayfield 

Hazard 

Harrodsburg 

Edmonton 

Middlesborough 

Millei'sburg 

West Liberty 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Murray 

Newport 
NewTiort 
Vine Grove 



Oldham County LaGrange 

Old Kentucky Home Bardstown 
Owensboro Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic Owensboro 



Paducah Tilghman 

Paint Lick* 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City* 

P. L. Dunbar 

Perryville* 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

Pleasure Ridge Pk. 

Prestonsburg 

Providence 

Raceland 

Rosenwald 

Rowan County 

Russell 

Russellville 

St. Joseph 

St. Xavier 

Seneca 

Shawnee 

Shelby County 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Somerset 

Southern 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Temple Hill* 

Tompkins ville 

Trigg County 

Trinity 

Valley 

Versailles 

Waggener 

Wallins 

Warren County 

Western 

Western 

West Main 

Westport 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Wurtland 



Paducah 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

Lexington 

Perryville 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

Pleasure Ridge Pk. 

Prestonsburg 

Providence 

Raceland 

Harlan 

Morehead 

Russell 

Russellville 

Bardstown 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Louisville 

Shelbyville 

Shelbyville 

Shepherdsville 

Somerset 

Louisville 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Glasgow 

Tompkinsville - 

Cadiz 

Louisville 

Valley Station 

Versailles 

Louisville 

Wallins Creek 

Bowling Green 

Louisville 

Paris 

Lynch 

Louisville 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Wurtland 



J. S. O'.vnby 
Robert Thum 
Tom Ellis 
Fleming Thornton 



Roy Walton 
Waddell Murpny 
Clarence Caple 

Robert Igo 
Joe Lankford 
William Griffith 
John C. McVoy 
Al Hanley 
Jerry Abney 
Davis Fryrear 
Wallace Isham 
Charlie David 
Olin Fishback 
Dan Sullivan 
Jim Messer 

Tom Sims 

Jack Ison 
Bill Welborn 
Charles Kuhn 
Virgin Rains 
Ed Wilson 
Amos Black 
Howard B. Kesl 
Dave Hurst 
Gordon Betts 
Hal Lockhart 
Henry Hina 
Phil Owen 
Lawrence Travis 
Preston Hollani 

Charlie True 
Charles Frederick 
Daniel Walker 

John Buckner 
Milton Graham 
Ralph Genito 
L. E. VanMeter 

Ed Rutledge 
Homer Profitt 
Walter J. Brugh 
Ben Pumphrey 
Aaron Turner 
N. L. Passmore 
Jim Farley 
Eugene Davis 
William Adams 
James O. Gatewood 
Hade Durbin 
Paul Armstrong 
James Conley 
T. J. Walker 
Paul Ousley 
Heulyn Bishop 
Waymond Morris 
Richard Blocker 
John Meihaus 
Ron Cain 
George E. Sauer 
Vincent Hancock 
Richard Greenwell 
Dan Moore 
Jim Williams 
Geoi'ge Bertram 
Charles Kolasa 
Rodney Walker 
Ralph Horning 
Robert Pardue 
Clifton Carter 
Raymond Heffingtor 
Charles Quire 
Dallas Arnold 
John Snowden 
Martin Deim 
James L. Howard 
Eck Branham 
Virgil E. HoUoway 
William B. Reed 
Eugene Traylor 
William Tate 
Ray Brackett 
Gardner Bates 
Archie Powers 
Joe Robinson 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1962 



Page Seven 



Registered Basketball Officials 
of the K.H.S.A.A.--1962 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If tw* 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Abell, James A., 200 Pepper Lane, Paducah, 443-1309. 442-5484 

Acra, Russell L., 219 W. Mulberry, Lebanon 3-2399 

Adair, Lewis C, 4911 Ronwood Drive, Louisville 19, 969-7398, 

JU 7-7471 
Adams, Roy D., 302 Brunswick Rd., Louisville 7, TW 5-6367, 

TW 5-0567 
Adams, Troy E., 900 Plainview Drive, Shelbyville, 633-4530 
Adams, William M.. Letcher, 633-7787 
Adkirs, Jessie J., Sandy Hook, RE 8-5141 

Adkins, Wendell, Box 57, Wallins Creek, MO 4-3644, MO 4-3444 
Akins, Charlie. Cecilia, 862-1911, 765-4186 
Akridge, Dean, Fredonia, 4801, 4432 
Albright, G. F., Irvington, 547-3011, 547-2051 
Alexander, Howard S., Crittenden, 824-2854 
Alexander, Leon, Route No. 2, Irvington, 536-2378 
Alexander, Rex E., 1320 Wells Blvd., Murray, PL 3-3579, PL 

3-2310 
Allen, Harry Gordon, Box 163, Prestonsburg, TR 4-2616, BU 

6-3011 
Allen, James D., Martin. BU 6-3024, BU 5-3422 
Allen, James W. "Dink", 3444 Monel Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Allen, Lowry R., 812 Fort Drive, Bowling Green, 3-9346, 2-1632 
Allen, Nelson R., 317 Riverside Drive, Russell, 836-3242, 324- 

1456 or 836-8822 
Alley, Joe. Route No. 2, Prichard. W. Va. 
Anders, Raleigh A., Route No. 5, Box 73A, London, 4-5946, 

4-5877 
Anderson, Don. Box 41, Chattaroy. W. Va. 
Arnold, Kenneth L., 9606 Seatonville Rd., Fern Creek, 239-5446, 

CE 9-3267 
Austin, W. G., 1928 Cherry, Paducah, 443-7071 
Back, Bill, Box 232, Lothair, 436-3846, 6-2600 
Baker, Robert M., Jr., 411 Jean Drive, Danville, 236-2092, 

236-3591 
Baker, Roger L., 1901 Port Royal Court, Lexington, 7-7839 
Ball, Delbert, Shakertown Road, Burgin, 748-5395, 748-5221 
Ballaban, Tom, 1103 Archland Drive, Cincinnati 24, Ohio, 522- 

3024, 761-7600 
Bankemper. Thomas, 317 E. 7th St., Newport, 581-5047 
Barker, Bob R., 1715i/o Harlan St., Ashland, 324-5360 
Barker, Walter D., Friendship, Ohio, UL 8-1967, EL 3-0190 
Barlow, Bill R., 105 Hillcrest Ave., Lexington, 5-0071, 6-0230 
Barton, Walter W., Route No. 2, Box 303, Corbin, 1922, 9144 
Bates, Gardner, Jr., Box 251, Whitesburg. 7174 
Baughn, E. L.. 1403 Johnson, Murray, PL 3-5799, EX 6-4186 
Beasley, Donald, Dunnville, 787-2782, 787-6094 
Begley, Berlie B., Jr., 9019 Wilson Road, Fort Knox, 4-3379 
Begley, Jack, 1602 Florence St., Middletown, Ohio, GA 3-4279, 

GA 2-2711 ext. 669 
Bell, Clarence T., 1228 So. 41st St., Louisville 11, SP 8-7792, 

JU 4-1361 ext. 7117 
Benedict. Johnny, Virgie, 639-4400 

Bennett, Gene, Wheelersburg, Ohio, PR 6-2656, GL 6-4191 
Benzinger, Joseph, Jr., Greenmound Road, New Richmond, Ohio, 

742-8691, 762-0555 
Bero, James J., Box 968, Williamson W. Va. 
Berry, Patrick H.. 2968 Cheyenne Dr. Owensboro, 884-7070, 

683-9038 
Beyerle, Joseph M., 6731 Fourson Dr., Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 

941-2235, 941-2235 
Bisig, Cliff, 2419 Broadmeade Rd.. Louisville, GL 4-3797, ME 

7-8717 
Black, Clarence, West Liberty, SH 3-7302, SH 3-3405 
Black, Ronald E., Armed Forces Exam. Station, Ft. Thomas, 

441-7550, 441-2410 
Blackburn, Tennyson R., Box 2157, Williamson, W. Va. 
Blackburn, Viley O., 210 College, Somerset, 678-8986, 678-8171 
Blankenship, Zeb, College Manor, Harrodsburg, 734-2464, 734- 

4195 
Blanton, Bob, Elm Street, Harlan, 883, 526 
Blanton, Leonard, 2117 Washington, Flatwoods, 836-5697 
Blevins, Boone, Jr., Staffordsville, AM 5-2164 (Bus.) 
Boehm. Robert "Ted", 1812 Virgin St., Ashland, 324-6892, 324- 

6225 
Bocook, Earl, 1102 Beech Street, Kenova, W. Va. 
Bocook, George Allen, 1906 Walnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Boeskin, Francis William, 318 McClelland, St. Bernard 17, Ohio, 

Boisseau, Douglas, State Street, Guthrie, 483-2126, 483-2689 
Bomersbach, Hoyte, 203 E. South St., Mayfield, CH 7-2443 (Bus.) 
Bowling, Roy, Fields Lane, London. 864-5006, 864-5006 
Bowman, E. G. "Dick", 687 Mt. Vernon, Lexington, 6-8111, 

2-3343 
Boyd, Tommy, 7908 Greenway Drive, Lyndon, TW 5-2917, ME 

7-1619 , 
Boyles, Paul E., Belfonte Rd., Russell, 836-5497, 836-3141 ext. 

258 
Bradshaw, Bill, Shakertown Road, Burgin, 748-B265, 748-5253 



Bradshaw, Frank, 2166 E. Gum, Evansville, Indiana, GR 6-6995, 

HA 5-6211 ext. 219 
Braughler. David L., 253 Montrose Drive, Madisonville, 821-2709 
Brewer, Randell, P. O. Box 73, London. 864-5608, 864-2107 
Brichler, Joe A.. 5737 Kiefer Court. Cincinnati, Ohio, KI 1-6049, 

PA 1-1984 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville B, GL 4-6843, 

JU 7-9111 
Brooks, Jerry M., 1809 Williamsburg Rd., Lexington, 7-2590, 

Brown, Donald W.. 301 North 8th St.. Murray, 753-2937 
Brown. E. C, Box 312, Liberty, 787-4421. 787-4101 
Brown. Eddie W., 162 Roberta Ave., Florence, 282-2686 
Brown, J. Carlton, 411 O'Hara Drive, Danville, 236-3474, 236- 

6515 
Brown, Leonard C. 575 W. Short, Lexington. 2-2183 
Brown, Paul D.. Hager Hill, 789-5323, 789-3410 
Brown, Thomas F., 3698 Kenoak Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 351- 

6632 731-2323 
Bruner, John Lee, 133 Mahan Ave.. London. 864-2476, 864-2026 
Bryan, William B., Route No. 4, Paris, 362-4228, 362-4264 
Buis, Nathaniel, Liberty. 787-3471, 787-2852 
Bullock, Teddy, 148 N. Arcadia St., Lexington 
Bunn, Harold, 2623V- CoUis Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Bunnell, Kenneth L.. Munfordville. 524-2361. 624-2321 
Burke, Harry R., 328 Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, TU 6-2796, 

TU 6-2386 
Burkett, Garvis, Nancy. 678-6913, 678-4942 
Burkhart. James, Wallins, MO 4-3697 
Burrows, Walter H., Jr., Lee Road, Paducah, 442-3812 
Butcher. Douglas. Williamsport, 789-5280 
Butler, Jack K.. 2604 Fourth Ave.. Huntington, W. Va. 
Butner. Billy M.. 128 Price Court, Lancaster, 792-3503, 792-3503 
Byars, Michael Kirk, 1106 Slashes Road, Lexington, 6-3269, 

6-3269 
Byrd, Harry G., 7331 North Timberlane Drive, Cincinnati 43, 

Ohio, 661-8746. 561-8746 
Cain. Robert Bruce, 226 Fields, Cumberland. 589-4102 
Caldwell, James A., 14 Chesapeake, Newport, 441-1626, 397-2486 
Campbell, French, Box 356. Allen, TR 4-2266 
Campbell, Keller, 630 S. Gay Place, Lexington, 4-1347, 2-2200 

ext. 2314 
Canter. John, 2826 Esther Blvd., Louisville, GL 1-8218, JU 

Carnes, Dick, 110 Plenty, New Richmond, Ohio, 742-4172, 742- 

7701 
Carr, Martin L., Route No. 3, Cynthiana, 809W, 809J 
Carrithers, Calvin L., 1813 Millgate, Box 358, Anchorage, 425- 

1970, CH 5-4161 
Caruso, Dick, 1160 Wellspring Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 521- 

3349, 421-3300 
Cash, Randall E., 4504 Janice Way, Louisville. EM 7-8714, 

EM 7-1721 
Cassell, Curtis. 1400 Carter Ave., Ashland, 324-5933, 324-3165 
Casteel, Ralph M., E. Bernstedt. VI 3-2730 (Bus.) 
Caster, Boyd J., Jr., Sheraton Hotel, Louisville, 969-3474, 684- 

4141 
Cathey. Gene S., 1416 Vine, Murray, PL 3-6367, PL 3-3245 
Cecil, John O., Jr., 1210 S. Green, Glasgow, 651-2410, 661-2007 
Chafin, David L., 135 So. College. Pikeville, 437-7779 
Chambers, William Virgil, 169 Wabash, Lexington, 7-9358 
Chandler, Roger A., Eastview, Shelbyville, ME 3-3662. ME 

3-2653 
Chattin, Ernest Patrick, 2147 Central Ave., Ashland, 324-2665, 

324-6191 
Cieslack. Albert, Box 97, Richland, Indiana, EL 9-4960, EL 

9-4960 
Clark, Larry W., 317 Green Hill, Vine Grove, WI 274-2777 

(Bus.) 
Clemmons, Sam P., 162 Woodland Ave., Lexington, 6-3562, 

3-3534 
Click, Bobby Joe, Manton, BU 5-3067, BU 5-3014 
Clipp, Marvin W.. 130 Fuller Hall, Southern Seminary, Louis- 
ville, TW 3-5732 
Clusky, Joe, Red Jacket, W. Va. 
Cobb, Mike. Route No. 2, Central City, 1427-J, Bowling Green 

VI 3-9271 
Cochran, Roy H., Jr., 206 Bishop, Corbin 
Coleman, Daniel L., 3 East 41st St., Covington, 261-2388, 531- 

6214 
Coleman. Duke, 2554 Southview, Lexington, 7-3672 
Coleman, James E.. Phelps. GL 6-3407 (Bus.) 
Collins. Larry H., 3148 Beech Ave., Covington, AX 1-8616, ME 

1-0010 
Collins, Hubert, Nippa, CY 7-3152 (Bus.) 
Colvin Paul F., Route No. 2, Paducah Rd., Mayfield, 247-6969, 

247-3913 
Combs, Franklin Delano, Jackson, 666-2446 (Bus.) 
Combs, Harvey M.. Jeff, GE 6-3401 
Combs, Keith A., 1304 MacArthur Drive, Evansville 14, Indiana, 

GR 7-2869. HA 5-7276 
Combs, Roy Donald, Route No. 1, Box 603B, Hazard, 436-2820, 

436-2135 
Combs, W. Eugene, Route No. 2, Box 239, Hazard 
Combs, William, Jr., 1231 Roosevelt Drive, Evansville 14, Indi- 
ana, GR 7-4277, HA 3-4436 
Conley, Connie B., Oils Springs, CY 7-3066 
Conley. George D., 2436 Roosevelt Ave., Ashland, 324-6042 
Conn, John D., 4300 Retreat, Louisville 19, 964-1759. JU 7-6205 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1962 



Cornell. Jerrv L., 406 South 9th St.. Williamsburg. 6374 
Cooper. Hewlett. Route No. 4. Murray. 753-3336, 753-3381 
Cooper. Warren. 120 Barber Court. Morehead. ST 4-4295 
Corley. William H., 622B Poplar Level Rd., Louisville 19, 964- 

1011. 964-1500 
Cornett, John M., Bo.x 185, Hindman, ST 5-5321, MI 2-3585 
Coryell, Francis W., 616 W. Southern Heights, Louisville, 363- 

9744, BU 2-4341 
Coudret, Raymond J„ Jr„ 3704 Conlin, Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 7-4259, HA 5-3339 
Coulter, William, 807 Taylor Ave., Evansville 13, Indiana, HA 

3-7510 
Covington, Ralph, 122 Royal Spring, Georgetown, 108 
Covington, Richard, Guthrie, Elkton 265-2961, Guthrie 483-2585 
Cox. Charles Glenn. 326 S. Morgan, Morganfield. 160, 6 
Crager, Bobby F., Prestonsburg 

Crank. Albert. Louisa St.. Catlettsburg. 324-3060 (Bus.) 
Crawford, Tom, 2146 Algonquin Parkway, Louisville, SP 2- 

7504. WH 4-8685 
Creech, Harvey J,, Leatherwood, 675-3061 
Crocetti, Dom, 8002 Red Cedar Way, Louisville 19, 969-1895, 

NE 7-2300 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., 1236 76th St. North, St. Petersburg, 

Fla., 344-6361, 5-2151 
Gulp, Ronald D., 209 Prospect, Bellevue, 261-7834 
Gulp, Willard E., P, O. Box 372. Oak Grove, Clarksville, Tenn,, 

647-5002, Ft. Campbell 3915 
Cummins. Al. P. O. Box 365, Cynthiana, 815, 2002 
Cummins, Curtis L.. 289 Hemlock. Benham, 848-2546 
Cunningham, Jack D., Majestic, 456-3430 
Cunningham, Julian R., Mt. Sterling, 1055J3, 1500 
Curnutte, James R.. 201 East 8th Ave., Huntington, W, Va. 
Cun-ent, Ellis Ray, 1933 Bellefonte Dr., Lexington, 7-1049, 

5-4660 
Dame, L. J., 604 Ridgewood, Owensboro, MU 4-5681, MU 2401 

ext. 238 
Daniels, Bob, Greenville, 1228, 146 
Daniels, Robert A., Van Lear, 789-4721 
Daum, Charles A.. 216 Christ Road, Evansville, Indiana, HA 

4-0217, HA 2-8805 
Davis, Ralph E,, Vanceburg, SW 6-4501, SW 6-2521 
Davis, Ronnie, 131 East Arch St., Madisonville, TA 1-5007 
Davis, William P., 1003 8th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Day, Bill E , Dept. of Econ. Security, Div. of Pub. Assistance, 

Capitol Annex, Frankfort 
Deim, Martin F., Box 795, Route No, 4, Anchorage, 425-1765, 

TW 5-0567 
DeMoisey, Fox, 227 Highland, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-0795, HI 1-0795 
Denekas, Raymond D., Annville, 364-2661, 264-2666 
Dennedy, T. Robert, 5052 Foley Rd., Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 921- 

3905, 921-3744 
Denney, Murrell C, Eubank. 379-3502, 379-4440 
Denton. Charles, 127 Hubbard Lane, Henderson, VA 6-4020, 

VA 6-9533 
DeVary, Bill, 217 Hickman, Winchester, PI 4-6114 
Dial, Charles R.. 3310 Monel Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dierolf, Maj. William H.. Jr., 135 Beech St., Shavertown, Pa. 
DiMuzio, Robert M.. 6422 Golfway Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

541-2220, 621-8110 
Disken, Jim, 2930 Vine St., Cincinnati 19, Ohio, AV 1-0136, 

281-9264 
Divine, James Ralph, Route No. 1, Bremen. 988-M2 
Divine, Wayne, Route No. 1. Bremen, 988M2 
Dixon, Charles T., 304 McDonald Drive, Versailles, 873-5054, 

873-4989 
Dobson, Kenneth, Route No. 3, Paducah, 442-0778, 443-4534 
Dodee. Bruce B., Jr„ Radio Station WKLO, Louisville, 361-2027, 

JU 3-4441 
Dodson, Winston. 213 Greenbriar Road, Lexington, 7-2598, 2-2250 
Doll, Louis E., 7676 Reinhold Drive, Cincinnati 37, Ohio, GR 

1-8757, PO 1-4210 
Dorsey, James, 1110 Gilsey Ave., Cincinnati 5, Ohio, GR 1-8050 
Dotson, John B., 504 McKinney Road, Vincennes, Indiana, 

TU 2-8095, TU 2-8480 
Dotson. W. S.. 432 East 5th St., Lexington, 2-5131, 4-0350 
Drahman, Thomas, W., 116 8th Ave., Dayton, 431-1203 
Drake, Richard. 61 Edwards Court, Ft. Thomas, 441-4235 
Driskell. Earl, Jr., 650 South 44th St., Apt. 11, Louisville, 

SP 8-5943. SP 4-5781 
Driver, Bob, Route No. 4. Glasgow. 427-2475 
Duerson. William Robert, Box 480, Lancaster, 792-2459 (Bus.) 
Duff, Birchell. Garrett 

Dunaway. Adrian. Sharpsburg. 247-2587, 247-2587 
Duncan, Earl, 10,007 Taylorsville Rd., Jeffersontown, AN 

7-1478, TW 5-0567 
Dykes, Larry, 232 Harding St., Danville, 236-5853 
Eades, Jimmy, South Carrollton, 481 J (Bus.) 
Earles, Charles, College Hts. Post Office. Bowling Green 
Eaton. James Marvin, 2015 Merriewood Dr., Owensboro, MU 

4-1188 
Edelen, Ben R., 2842 Klondike Lane, Louisville 18, GL 4-3518, 

GL 2-2611 
Edgington, Fred, 409 East 7th St.. Manchester, Ohio, 549-5734 
Edwards, Don, Box 317. Sebree, TE 5-7537, TE 5-7592 
Elkins, R. Percy, Elkhorn Ave.. Jenkins, 445, 58 
Ellington, James E„ Box 428, London, 864-4263, 864-2665 
Elliott, Carroll L., 214 Sunset Road, Elizabethtown, 765-4007, 

765-6118 
Ellis, Johnny, Prestonsburg, TU 6-2751, TU 6-3080 



Elrod, W. T.. 332 Sumpter, Bowling Green, 2-5110, 2-0341 

Engle, Orville, 128 Oak St., Pineville 7-2916 

Ernst, Edward R.. Box 68, Hebron, 689-7181 

Fairchild, Kenton, Inez 

Fandrich, William W., Route No. 4 Murray, PL 3-3193, PL 

3-3193 
Farley, Jimmy, W. Jefferson, Berea, 986-4464 

Farmer, Ralph L., 100 Liberty St.. Somerset, 679-1245, 678-8194 
Feher, A. J.. Box 227. Lynch, 848-2717, 848-5431 
Fenton. Don J., 4890 Oaklawn Drive, Cincinnati 27, Ohio, 

271-3792, 731-4343 
Ferguson, Ford, Route No. 2. Waverly, Ohio, 8033R, 8033R 
Ferrell, Jimmy L., 219 Cedar St.. Glasgow, 651-3661 
Finley, Albert R., Route No. 4, Hopkinsville, 886-4108, 885-8335 
Finley, Sam, 4631 Oak Drive, Louisville, EM 8-7390, JU 2-8252 
Fiske, Capt. John R., 5438D Brett Drive, Ft. Knox, 4-4703, 

4-6357 
Flaugher. Allen, Route No, 1, Brooksville, 735-2924, 261-5620 

ext. 384 
Floyd, Raymond, Route No. 2, Oak Hill Road, Somerset, 678- 

4801, 678-5863 
Fly, Edward Lynn. 1086 Salem, Memphis, Tenn.. FA 3-6338 
Flynn. Reynolds P., 1009 Banklick St., Covington. HE 1-5080 

(Bus. I 
Fort. John W., APSC, Clarksville, Tenn.. 645-2556, 439-5211 ext. 

3489 
Foster. Berryman E., 927 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 3-1827, 

2-7847 ext. 35 
Foster, Clifford W.. 7840B Estrada, Ft. Knox, 4-5076, 4-5710 
Foster, J. W.. 821 Carneal Road. Lexington, 4-8058. 3-3335 
Foster. William R., Science Hill, 423-8683, 678-8161 
Fox, David G., McKee, 287-2274 

Fralev, Bill, 1604 Lee Drive, Henderson, VA 7-3232 
Frazer, Tom Roe, 513 East Lyon St.. Morganfield. 182, 222 
Freeman, Jack M., 1104 15th St., Huntington, W, Va. 
Freese. Oliver T., 5518 Mapleridge, Cincinnati, Ohio, LO 1-5398, 

731-5267 
Fricke, Harold "Joe", 4761 Clevesdale Drive, Cincinnati 38, 

Ohio, 251-1791 
Frye, Gilbert L.. 524 Hiawatha Trail, Frankfort. CA 3-5117, 

Fulkerson.'james^R.. 1611 Navajo Drive. Owensboro. MU 4-5458 
Fuller, John R., Jr., Route No. 8. Paducah. 898-3115, 443-5626 
Furgerson, William W., 711 Ryan, Murray. PL 3-1336. PL 3-2310 
Gaddis. George M., Route No. 1, St. Joseph, MU 3-8282 (Bus.) 
Gaither, Gene, Box 103 .Beaver Dam, BR 4-3885, BR 4-3885 
Gaither, Jack. Rockport. 274-4357, 274-3661 
Gallemore, Charles R., Box 78, McConnell, W. Va. 
Gardner, Howard, McCullum, Elizabethtown, 765-6273, Ft. Knox 

4-6638 
Geiser. Robert. 6532 Beechmont Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio BE 

1-8564, BE 1-5046 
Gentry, Charles C, Oak Grove, Tenn., 431-3405, 431-3440 
Gerding, James, 1007 Patterson. Newport, 291-5152, JU 1-2410 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Rd., Lexington, 6-4801, 2-0410 
Gilbert, Gerald L., Tunnell Hill Rd.. Elizabethtown, Ft. Knox 

4-7719 (Bus.) 
Gilbert, Gordon J., 301 Brookwood. Hamilton, Ohio, 892-3678 
Gilbert, Lawrence "Butch", 208 Southern Drive, Campbellsville, 

465-7697, 465-5091 
Gill, Joe, 455 Marrimon Ave., Harrodsburg. 734-2729, 734-4195 
Gillespie, Robert C, No. 8 Wilana Court, Pikeville, 7-7934, 

7-7190 
Gilligan, Jack, 1146 Tassie Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, JA 2-2042 
Golden, Billy Joe, 568 East Main, Lynch, 848-2512 
Goldey, William H., 463 Crestview Dr., Henderson, VA 7-3622 

VA 6-3931 
Gooch, Lloyd E., Stanford, 365-7259 

Goodall, Walter, 820 Park, Newport, 291-9470, 261-3313 
Gordon, Billy K., Route No. 2 Waddy, TA 9-5137, IN 1-7820 
Gorence, John P., 2506 Standard, Louisville, SP 6-5719, SP 

6-8555 
Gossett, John P., 1113 Maple Ave., Ashland, 324-2294, 324-5138 
Gour, Robert A„ 244 Audubon, Bowling Green, VI 3-9582, VI 

2-0341 ext. 241 
Gourley, Harold E., 1700 N. Alvord Blvd.. Evansville, Indiana, 

GR 6-6191, HA 3-4016 
Cover, Robert J., 1831 McElroy, Bowling Green, VI 2-3306, VI 

3-3247 
Grace, Charles K.. Cypress St., Pineville, 337-3331, 337-2348 
Graves, Preston H., Marrowbone, 864-3604 
Gray. Raymond, Box 87, Livermore, BR 8-2615 
Grigsby, Pete. Jr.. McDowell, FR 7-2356, FR 7-6202 
Gumm, Kenneth E., 7304 Edenderry Lane, Louisville, 969-7335, 

GL 4-7611 ext. 659 
Gustafson. Al. "Gus", Jr.. 248 Francis Bldg.. Louisville, GL 

4-6151, JU 4-7655 
Haap, Virgil L., 6885 Memory Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 621- 

7607, 641-3515 
Hackel, John C, Jr., 3409 Burrell Drive, Louisville 15, EM 

8-8207 
Hagan, Joe, 3000 Sherbrooke Road, Louisville, GL 8-1325 
Hagen, William R.. 2660 Banning, Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 622- 

0647, KI 1-1800 ext. 397 
Haines. William E., 901 Bellefonte Rd., Flatwoods, 836-5395 
Hale, James J., South Main St., Williamstown 
Hall. Douglas. Frenchburg 
Hall. Elvis, 700 George, Owensboro, MU 4-7624 (Bus.) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1962 



Page Nine 



Hall, Mac, Route No. 1, Box 178, Williamson, W. Va. 
Hamilton Steve, Morehead State College, Morehead 
Hamm, L. E.. Route No. 3, Mayfield, MA 3-3277, CH 7-5570 
Hammons, Norman, Route No. 4 Hopkinsville, TU 5-5914, TU 

5-5301 
Hampton, Ray, 726 Richardson St., Clarksville, Tenn., 647- 

4969, 647-6351 
Hardin, Carl Ray, P. O. Box 19, Lebanon, 692-2214, 692-3109 
Hardin, Jack H., 1105 B Street, Ceredo, W. Va. 
Hardin, William R., Box 171, Inez, 298-3568, 298-3685 
Hargis, Bobby S., Box 3 Calvert City, 395-4849, 395-3181 
Harper, Robie, Jr., Beechmont, Drakesboro, GR 6-2264 (Bus.) 
Harris. Billy, Cleaton, 759-R2, 45 

Harvey, Bennie, 925 Center. Henderson, VA 6-3758 
Hatfield, Cecil E., Box 2676, Williamson, W. Va. 
Hatter, Jack, 1654 Amsterdam Road, Covington, 331-2444,421- 

9810 
Hay, E. Clayton, Martha, OL, 2-3757, OL 2-3734 
Hayden, Samuel J., Fancy Farm, MA 3-3641, MA 3-9111 
Haynes, Ohlin "Bud", 7810 Bitteroot Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

931-3928 731-1122 
Hedge, David W., 321 Mockingbird Drive, Jeffersonville, Indiana, 

BU 2-2242 
Heitzman, Warren E., 7291 Memory Lane, Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 

321-7530, 761-4100 ext. 1861 
Henderson, George R., Radio Station WTCW, Whitesburg, 

633-2711 (Bus.) 
Hendon, L. J., 106 S. 12th St., Murray, PL 3-3658, PL 3-2825 
Hendricks,DudIey, 620 W. Main St., Richmond, 623-3680 
Hertzbberger, Robert Harold, 1310 Terrace, Evansville, Indiana, 

4-1681, 5-6211 
Hewitt, R. T., 813 Sharp St., Murray. 753-5435, 753-2310 ext. 

260 
Hicks, Don, Route No. 1, Boaz, 444-7858 
Higdon, Jack H., 4702 C. Lee Village, Ft. Campbell, 439-4354, 

5413 
Higgins, Bobby D., General Delivery, Sebree, TE 5-7572 
Hlil, Earl F., Route No. 1, Box 49-A, London, 864-2521, 864- 

4621 
Hill, Martin, North 6th St., Williamsburg, 3171 
Hitch, Kenneth L., Route No. 1, Alexandria, 697-5661 
Hiten, John W., 722 Melrose, Lexington, 6-2759, 2-2868 
Hitt, Billy D., Route No. 2, Mayslick, 763-2608, 564-5327 
Hobbs, Fred L., 501 Warwick Drive, Owensboro, MU 3-8209, 

MU 3-2401 ext. 512 
Hobby, Bill, 907 Mechanic, Princeton, EM 5-5195, EM 5-2051 
Hodge, Fred A., 2011 Joyce Ave., Evansville, Indiana, GR 7-2993, 

HA 4-6411 
Hofstetter, Joe, Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 
Hogan, Cleo C, Sr.. Box 86, Park City, 749-2267, 651-2133 
Holbrook, B. J., 313 Stockton Drive, Owensboro, MU 4-4802, 

684-5501 
Holeman, Bill R., 103 Locust St., Manchester, 598-2999 
Holmes, Robert D., 500 East Locust, Princeton, EM 6-5129. 

EM 5-2028-9 
Holt, Glenn, Jamestown, 343-2181, 343-7511 
Holt, Terrell W., Box 204-College Station, Murray St. College, 

Murray, Mayfield OR 4-5321 
Holtzclaw, James B., Route No. 4, Hustonville, 346-2494 
Hook, B. B., Jr., Route No. 5 Paducah, 443-4610, 443-3738 
Horton, Aldrich, L., Box 47. Greenville, 1004 
Hubbs, Cletus L., Jr., 319 South Main, Eminence, 845-7111, 

846-4071 
Huber, Jerry, 29 East Fourth, Covington, 681-0897, 431-5346 
Hudson, Oscar, 708 Highland Ave., Hazard, 436-3858, 436-2733 
Huggins, Jim, 351 Sumpter, Bowling Green, 2-5519, 2-5303 
Hughes, Robert E., 400 Briggs, Russellville, PA 6-6334, PA 

6-6335 
Huiet, Fred "Whitey", 7327 Osceola, Madeira 43, Ohio, 561- 

. 9239, 241-4768 
Hulsey, Donald R., 1222 B. Delaware, Evansville, Indiana, 

HA 5-3677, WO 3-3124 
Hunley, Neil P., 386 Main St., West Liberty, SH 3-3131, SH 

3-3705 
Hurley, Robert, Box 244. Williamson, W. Va. 
Hutchinson, Jack, Martin, BU 5-3427 

Hyatt, Bob, 634 South 3rd St., Louisville, JU 7-8611 (Bus.) 
Hyland, F. D., P. O. Box 465, South Webster, Ohio, PR 8-2401, 

Waverly, O., 5-100 ext. 2165 
Hynson, Fred R., 441 Kingsway Dr., Lexington, 6-4285, 4-9896 
Ingraham, Gary, J., 1030 Greenleaf Rd., Louisville, ME 7-2755, 

TW 7-2815 
Inman, Briscoe, Centre College, Danville, 236-5740, 236-5211, 

ext. 26 
Irwin, Charlie, Route No. 1, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4820, TU 6-4820 
Isaacs, John F., 305 Northland Dr., Lexington, 2-2931, 2-2250 

ext. 3326 
Jackson, Roy, Webster St., Sebree, TE 5-7566 (Bus.) 
Jahnigen, Robert E., 6007 Red Bank, Cincinnati, Ohio, 791- 

2345 
James, Carl Edwin, 9404 Ponder Lane, Valley Station, WE 

7-3726 
James, Gene. 1015% South 6th St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-6976, 

JE 2-6224 
Jenkins, Kean, 210 Morningside, Elizabethtown, 766-4887 
Johnson, James L., Louisville Rd., Route No. 1, Bowling Green, 

VI 2-7683, VI 3-9989 



Johnson, Gerry, 715 West 7th St., Russellville, PA 6-2793, PA 

6-6061 
Johnson, Stan, 2115 Ottawa, Owensboro, MU 4-2167 
Johnson, Vernon Lee, Jr., Highway 27, Falmouth. 654-5771, 

654-5771 
Johnson, Walter, Box 397, Grayson, 474-5908, 474-6721 
Johnson. William Bernard, Route No. 7, Hopkinsville, AM 

9-2209, TU 5-5366 
Jones, Boyer, 437 Jackson, Campbellsville, 465-5953 
Jones, Casron G.. 713 N. Main, Evansville, Indiana. HA 

2-3069, 4-7741 ext. 360 
Jones, Charles Junior, 2834 Yorkshire Blvd. Louisville, GL 

8-1293 
Jones, Daniels R., Cleaton, Central City 1586-J 
Jones, Joseph, 7303 Rockwood Rd., Louisville 19, 969-6898 
Jones, Paul, 314 Park Lane, Elizabethtown, 765-4602, Ft. 

Knox 4-7117 
Jones, Walter C, 2047 Powers St., Cincinnati 23. Ohio, 542-1815. 

931-4060 ext. 266 
Jordan, "Art", 526 Dalton St., Owensboro, MU 3-1024 
Jordan, Larry, 1917 Clifton Ave., Parks, 987-4513 
Junker, Edwin G., 1046 W. Seymour, Cincinnati 16, Ohio, VA 

1-4117 
Justice, Billy, Box 2183, Williamson, W. Va. 
Kaler, Jerry, 620 South 21st St., Paducah, 444-7950 
Keene, Marcum, Briggs 

Keeton. C. E. "Buck". Route No. 3, Franklin, 586-4253, Nash- 
ville, Tenn., AL 5-6331 
Kensler. Orville A., 9030 G. Estrada, Fort Knox, 4-3882, 4-4251 
Kercher. Norman L., 3126 Marlin Rd., Louisville, GL 2-2969, 

GL 2-2969 
Kessler, Robert H.. 1157 Standiford Ave., Louisville, EM 6-8629 
Key. Calvin, Hazel, 492-3431, 492-2341 
Kidwell, James. 1112 Parkway, Covington, JU 1-9141 
Kimmel, Jerry, Beechmont, GR 6-2656 
King, Dan, 1608 Madison Ave., Bowling Green, VI 3-3536, VI 

2-0341 
King. David L., Route No. 1, West Paducah, 488-1106, 488-1106 
King, James A., 5000 Clarmar Rd., Route No. 3, Jefferson- 
town, 239-8015, SP 6-2466 
King, P. J., 307 Coast Guard Lane, Owensboro, 3-2401 (Bus.) 
Kinman. Joe T.. 202 Hiawatha, Frankfort, 223-5131, 223-8791 
Kinney, Hall M., 436 E. Pleasant St., Cynthiana, 1684, Lexing- 
ton 2-2200 ext. 2484 
Kleinschmidt. Richard J., 9220 Loralinda Drive, Cincinnati 39, 

Ohio. 622-5431 
Kloenne. Jack, 703 Linden Ave., Newport. 431-5731 
Kloufetos, Spiro J., 55 LaSalle Place, Louisville 10, SP 8-6352 
Knight, Bill, 752 N. 36th St., Paducah, 443-2775, 443-2775 
Knight, Gary N.. 601 Highland, Paintsville, 789-4808 
Kremer, Joseph A., 3727 Glenmeade Road, Louisville, GL 4-3991, 

687-0026 
Kuhl, Lawrence, Box 207, Furnace St., Middlesboro. 2988, 806 
Lackey. James H.. 1801 12th Ave., Huntington. W. Va. 
Lally. James J., Apt. No. 9, 3233 Whitfield, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

761-5376 
Lamb, Paul, 427 Carlisle Ave., Lexington. 5-4126. 3-3335 
Lance. Walter, 2319 Maple. Owensboro. MU 3-3974, MU 3-1591 
Lankert, Noi-man E., 307 Sherwood Ave., Clarksville, Ind., 

BU 2-3368 
Lashbrook, Gene, P. O. Box 148, Owensboro, MU 3-2431 (Bus.) 
Laugherty, Kenneth Ray, Route No. 2, Walnut Drive, Somerset, 

678-8003 
Leahy. Pat, 1819 Ratcliffe, Louisville, SP 6-6368, JU 7-1121 

ext. 472 
Leonardt, Donald, Route No. 5, Box 347A, Evansville, Ind., 

UN 7-6217 
Lewis, Charles Odell. Route No. 6. Bowling Green, VI 2-9230 
Lindsey, Jack, Box 36, Blackey, 633-7765 

List, Frank A., Route No. 3, Owensboro, MU 3-6569, 684-6285 
Little. Bernard, P. O. Box No. 24. Hi-Hat, FR 7-6231, FR 7-6231 
Littlepage, Pryce, 22 Midway, Madisonville, TA 1-1642 
Lockard, Leo A.. 6806 Homestead Drive, Louisville, EM 8-8795 
Long, Bill, 209 Idlewylde, Louisville 6, TW 6-8731, SP 4-5781 
Long, David Marshall, Route No. 3, Shelbyville, ME 3-3213, 

ME 3-3181 
Longenecker, David M., 3910 Olympic, Louisville 7, TW 6-9071, 

TW 5-3401 ext. 301 
Looney, Dick. 1121 Myra Barnes, Pikeville, GE 7-6410 
Loudy, Kenneth, Slemp, 676-4278 

Lowe. Gene, Route No. 6, Box 28, London, 864-5724, 864-2207 
Lucas, Gene T., 100 Lemons Mill Rd., Georgetown, 1371, 19 
Lusby, George, 514 Clayton, Georgetown, 678-W, 1334 
Lykins, Joe D., Malone 

Lyons, Charles S., Route No. 2. Sharpsburg, 247-2457 
McAnelly, David F., Liberty, 787-2731, 787-2711 
McBee, William K., 76 Elwood Ave.. Burlington, 686-6462 
McBrayer, Don, 516 Greenup, Raceland, 836-8867 
McBride, William Kenneth, 167 St. William Drive, Lexington, 

6-7786, 3-3336 Station No. 1 
McCargo, Frank, 916 West 7th St., Hopkinsville, 886-1948, 885- 

9400 
McCarter, Bobby, 11 Concord, Clarksville, Tenn., MI 7-3170, 

Ft. Campbell, Ky. 3320 
McCormick, Lester E., Auburn, LI 2-8330. LI 2-8330 
McCowan, Connell, Route No. 1, Box 261, Corbin, 2361 
McCoy, Hayse, Box 265, Inez, 298-3417 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1962 



McDonald. Charles W., 1406 High St., Bowling Green, 3-6516 

I Bus.) 
McFall, Gene Gordon, 418, Big Hill Ave., Richmond. 623-5532, 

623-2780 
McGehee. Gordon. 4529 Carroll, Covington. 261-6880 
McGlasson. Galen W.. 212 North Bend Road. Hebron. 689-7330. 

689-7330 
McGIone. Maurice Baxton. 602 Maple Ave.. Falmouth. 654-8259. 

654-3316 
McGlothlin. Leonard. 916 Jackson St.. Owensboro. MU 4-7065. 

MU 3-2401 ext. 544 
McGuire, Jack. 229. North 17th St.. Louisville 3. JU 7-0400 
McHenrv. Louis P.. 4081,.'. Main St.. Hopkinsville. TU 6-2601. 

6-2813 
McKinney. Adelle F.. 5370 G, Fisher. Fort Knox. 4-6169. 4-2816 
Mr-Lean. Gordon. Codv. MI 2-3326 
McLeon. Robert N.. Jr.. Bourne Ave.. Somerset, 678-5569, 678- 

8766 
McL'n, Bruce. 252 2nd St.. Paintsville. 789-3607. 789-3881 
McNeely. Albert Thomas. 501 Leslie Ave.. P. O. Box 203. Glas- 

Bow 651-3290. 651-2094 or 651-2078 
McPike. Ray S.. Jr.. 309 Theatre Bldg.. 629 South 4th St.. 

Louisville 2, 541-3832. 585-2832 
McQnilling, Gerald. 2011 S. Lombard. Evansville, Indiana. GR 

6-6941. HA 5-3311 
Mary. Lowell Z.. Box 124. Hardinsburg, 756-5281. 756-2166 
Madden. McElrov. 463 Lindberg Drive. Lexington. 4-3604 
Madon. Robert Lee. 215 Tennessee Ave.. Pineville, ED 7-2135, 

ED 7-2135 
Mahan. Carle "Buddy". Hampton Manor. Winchester. PI 4-4550. 

Lexington 2-0290 
Mahanes Tom. Route No. 7. Lexington. 6-7366. 6-2007 
Marks. Edward W.. 9058-E Estrada. Ft. Knox. 4-8678. 4-1255 
Martin. Charlie Box 53. Sharosburg. CH 7-2611. CH 7-2141 
Marvel. Ross, 302 North Cherry. Murray. PL 3-2727 
Matthews. Dr. Lyle. 105 Albany Road. Monticello. 348-3066. 

348-3286 
Mattinely. Bernard. Clovernort. 788-6674 

Maxwell. James E.. Jr., Smith Ave.. Warsaw. 667-2001, 567-2001 
May. B. B.. Jr.. Box 185. Prestonsburg. TU 6-2314. TU 6-8661 
Maynard. Andrew J.. Matewan. W. Va. 
Meade. Foster "Sid", Box 63, South Portsmouth, YE 2-3584. 

YE 2-3221 
Melmige. James. Jr.. Apt. No. 6 M & S Courts. South William- 
son, AD 7-4536. HA 6-4401 
Melton. Robert E.. 416 Meadow St.. Henderson. VA 7-3067. 

VA 7-1838 
Meredith. Denny Edwin. Jr.. 513 South 2nd St.. Louisville. 

JU 2-9389. 685-3117 
Messerian. Nishan. 175 East Third St.. Williamson. W. Va. 
Metcalf. Earl L.. 3441 Lovelaceville Rd.. Paducah. 442-1359 
Meyer. Bud. 5319 Lilibet Court. Cincinnati 38. Ohio. 261-3459. 

721-4334 
Mickey. Elbert W.. Box 2471. Williamson. W. Va. 
Middleton. Johnny. 102 Westfield. Richmond. 623-1682 
Milbern. Daniel Lee. McKinney. FI 6-3571. 2-2250 ext. 2603 
Miller. Bob. 197 Holiday Lane. Ft. Thomas. 441-5885, 861-8000 

ext. 292 
Miller. Claude O.. 7041/, Tenth Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Miller. John L. Route No. 1, Winchester, 744-4012 
Miller, Kenneth H.. Co. C. Special Troops, Ft. Knox, 4-1255, 

4-7740 (Bus.) 
Miller. Rex J., 2711 Greenway Rd.. Ashland, 324-5023 
Miller, Roy J., 644 Whitcomb, Clarksville, Ind.. BU 3-6335. 

EM 6-6286 
Miller. Roy L.. Belton. GR 6-2666 
Miller. Victor L., 23 Pine Hill Dr., Highland Heights. 781-0619, 

431-3778 
Millerhaus, William J., 923 Harris Ave.. Cincinnati 5, Ohio, 

371-7904. 821-9722 
Minton. Eugene H., 901 South Green, Henderson, VA 7-3193 
Mitchell, Billy, 6711 Green Meadow Court, Louisville 6, TW 

5-0888 
Mitchell, Emmett, 120 Hamilton Park. Lexington. 5-3511, 4-0032 
Moll. Francis. 820 Mulberry. Mt. Vernon, Ind., PO 3-2870, 

PO 3-4489 
Monahan, Ed. 6821 Tarawa Dr.. Cincinnati 24. Ohio, 521-6582, 

681-8300 
Montgomery, Gordon D., 1112 Hustinville Rd.. Danville. 236- 

3116, 236-5763 
Moore. Hobert. 109 S. Day, Earlington, DU 3-5259. DU 3-4431 
Moore. James E., Route No. 5, Box 91 A, London, 864-2054, 

864-5114 
Moore, Robert, 441 Forest, Erlanger, 341-6837, 431-2174 
Morse. Richard K., 163 No. Deepwood, Radcliff, 351-3748, Ft. 

Knox 4-4454 
Moser, Emerson, Sebree, TE 5-7769, Henderson VA 6-2793 
Moser, Rudy Clay, Route No. 2. Sebree, Dixon 639-5317 
Moss, Julian, 106 Dickerson Court, Lancaster, 792-2954, 792-2711 
Mouser, H. D.. Princeton Rd., Madisonville, TA 1-4864, SW 

7-3481 
Mudd, Ed, 3512 Mildred Dr., Louisville 16, SP 6-6888 
Murphy, Donald J.. 8875 Long Lane, Cincinnati 31, Ohio, 

WE 1-3189 
Murray, Thomas, 611 Edgecliff. Covington, HE 11929 
Murrell, Allen L.. 1804 Woodhurst, Bowling Green, 842-1286, 

Franklin 686-3218 
Nash, Tom, Jr., 149 Preston Ave., Lexington, 6-5414. 5-5194 



Nau. Bill, Box 209, Barbourville. 6-4112, 6-3057 

Neal, Gene, 3648 SR 132, Route No. 1. Batavia, Ohio, 753-5908, 

281-4630 
Neal. James. 1222 Girvin Court. Owensboro, MU 4-3094, MU 

3-2401 ext. 512 
Newton. C. M. 2041 Dellwood Drive. Lexington. 7-2865 
Noble. Charles B.. 1164 Main St.. Jackson. 666-2728. 666-9224 
Noel. John "Pete". 2004 Harrison Ave.. Cincinnati 14, Ohio, 

MO 1-4111 
Nixon, James W.. 2713 Canton, Hopkinsville, TU 6-2641 
Oldham, John H.. Box 79A, Prospect, CA 8-1698 
Omer. Billy. 250 Reed Ave.. Madisonville. 821-2833 
O'Nan, Harold L.. 1927 Washington, Henderson, VA 6-4898 
Orr, George Kent, Dixie Highway, Box 297, Muldraugh, 942- 

2371 
Overton, Frank. Jr.. Four Mile. 337-2026, 337-2425 
Pack, James W., Route No. 1. Box 25, Catlettsburg. 739-4600, 

324-1111. ext. 626 
Padgett. R. K., 202V, College St.. Somerset. 678-5485, 678-4141 
Palmer, Carl A.. 2506 South 7th St., Ironton. Ohio. JE 2-6244 
Palumbo, Arthur O.. Annville. EM 4-2445. EM 4-2721 
Pardue. Robert E.. 221 Shelly Drive, Glasgow, 651-2456, GA 

7-2611 
Park. J. M.. P. O. Box 299. Paducah. 898-2785 
Parker. Billy E., Box 731. Pineville. 337-3293 
Parker, Jerrold B.. 631 Longview Drive, Lexington, 7-4646, 

2-5366 
Partrdige, William, 410 South 6th St., Rockport, Ind. MI 9-4157 
Patmore, Robert J., Box 132, Rockport, Ind. MI 9-4072, MI 

9-4111 
Patterson, Jimmy, Hustonville 
Patrick, Ralph, 4321 Grandview, Ashland, 324-7535, 324-1111 

ext. 566 
Paulin. Al. 538 Franklin. Tell City. Indiana. RI 7-3323, RI 7-3323 
Peeno. Harry R.. 30 Butler St.. Ludlow 
Pelphrey. James R., 239 Washington Ave., Paintsville, 789- 

3913, 789-6391 
Pennell, Donald G.. Box 682, Burdine, 110-R Jenkins 
Penner, Rev. Merritt D., Route No. 2, Box 528, Manchester, 

598-4098 
Pennington, Mel. RouteNo. 1, Box 294. Pikeville. 7-7636, 7-7323 
Pergrem. Nard. 3315 Pine Haven Drive, Ashland, 324-7664, 

324-1156 ext. 288 
Perry. Gary L.. 7137 Southside Dr., Louisville, WA 1-1790, 

JU 5-3252 
Perry, James E.. Route No. 6. Paducah, 443-6740, 444-6886 
Phelps. Ray, Box 533, Russell, 836-3670. 324-0309 
Phelps. Rudy. Russell. 836-3670, 324-1156 ext. 258 
Pittman. Spencer. 148V, Cotter Ave., Somerset. 679-1389, 678- 

5252 
Plumlee. H. M.. 3403 Hovekamp Rd.. Paducah. 442-8678 
Points. Charles, Jr., 414 Swan Circle, Elsmere. 341-9740, 341- 

7860 
Ponder, Paul, Livingston, 453-2662, 453-9061 
Porter, Albert. Morgantown. LA 6-3414 

Prall. John A.. Fort Knox Dependent Schools. Fort Knox 
Preece, Boyce C. Box 544. Kermit, W. Va. 
Price. James E.. Liberty, 787-2681 

Prichard, Glenn Wesley, Warfield, 393-3260, 393-3200 
Prior, Lowell F.. 1722 Highland Ave.. Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 

3-0700. EL 3-6129 
Pruden. Jim, 3739 Kipling Drive, Owensboro, MU 4-4469, MU 

3-4661 
Quillen, John, East Main, Hazard, 436-4893, 436-3711 
Rainey. Jimmy, 16 Phillips Court, Winchester, PI 4-2948, PI 

4-2818 
Rains, Richard, 2328 Alden Court, Covington 
Rakel, Bob, 1032 Williams St.. Maysville. 564-3909, 564-4078 
Randall, H. C, Box 227. Columbia, 384-2843, 384-2861 
Rapp, William, 216 Heplar, Ironton. Ohio. JE 2-1983 
Ratchford. Charles, 616 North 33rd St., Louisville, JU 4-6329, 

SP 2-0108 
Ratliff, Charles R., 701V. Vernon, Ironton. Ohio, JE 2-6541, 

JE 2-3911 
Rawlings, Harold. 182 East Park, Radcli£f, EL 1-3249, Ft. 

Knox 4-3277 
Reed, Charles R.. 102 Elizabeth. Versailles, 873-4213, 873-4896 
Reed. Gordon "Moe", 22 Riverside Parkway, Fort Thomas, 

441-4946, 541-4507 
Reed, William F. Sr., 1823 Augusta Drive Apt. No. 1, Lexington 

4-1324, 2-4363 
Reinhardt, Jerry W., North Hall, Western Ky. St. College, 

Bowling Green 
Reinhardt. Myron S.. 1443 N. Ft. Thomas Ave.. Ft. Thomas, 

441-3730, 697-9731 
Renfro. John E.. 446 Florence, Williamsburg, 6488. 6808 
Reschar, John V., Sr., 6518 Pico Lane, Louisville, 969-3885, 

937-2300 
Rexroat, Jerry L., Lebanon Junction, TE 3-4446 
Reynolds, Howard M., 809 S. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, 

CO 1-9727 (Bus.l 
Rhatigan, Alfred J.. 10663 Chelmsford Road, Cincinnati 40, 

Ohio, 825-2479, 351-6400 
Rice, Eugene C, 398 5th St., Paintsville, 789-5444, 789-3388 
Rice, Willard, S.. 202 College Court, Murray, 762-4422 
Rice, William, Jr., P. O. Box 214. Hickman, 2954 (Bus.) 
Richards. Dallas R., 65 Valley View Court, New Albany, Ind., 

WH 4-1730, WH 4-8471 
Riffe, James R., No. 7 15th St., Newport, 581-2287, 531-9987 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1962 



Page Eleven 



Riggs, Floyd L., Route No. 8, Box 400, Evansville, Indiana, 

UN 7-3090, HA 6-3346 
Eiley, James R., 560 Winter St., Russellville, PA 6-6574, PA 

6-7212 
Ring, William H., 244 Glendale Ave., Lexington. 2-6511, 6-2110 
Risen, Johnny B., 197 Third Street, Ravenna, 723-2852, 723-2616 
Ritter, Donald R., Waddy 

Hitter, Goebel, 107 Church St., Whitesburg, 633-7164, 633-2339 
Rivlin, Jule. Marshall University, Huntington, W. Va., 3-0768, 

Roach, Earl Milton, Star Route, Mayfield, 247-6078, Fulton 

2080 
Robbins, Burgess, Crab Orchard, 2023, 7311 

Roberts, Donald G., Box 103, Harrodsburg, 734-3433, 734-3673 
Roberts, Elza, Jr., Box 214, New Castle, 346-6981, Louisville 

JU 4-1341 ext. 330 
Roberts, Louis C, 600 Seneca Ave., Louisville, 363-4139 
Roberts, Ray M., 308 South 4th St., Murray, PL 3-5583 
Robinson, Don, 19061/' Walnut St., Kenova, W. Va. 
Robinson, Pearl, 363 Wayne, Manchester, 598-2691 
Roby, Joseph L., 3731 Frederica, Owensboro, MU 4-6893 
Rodgers, David Glen, 103 Ohio Lane, London, 864-4646 
Roeckers, Bernie, 803 Loda Drive, Cincinnati, Ohio, 762-1140, 

831-6103 
Rogers, Carl E., Cornith, Williamstown 824-6671 
Rogers, Howard, 17 Maryland, Winchester, PI 4-1786, Lexing- 
ton 2-2220 ext. 2231 
Rolph, Harold J., 916 South 7th St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-4036, 

JE 2-3231 
Rose, Lee H., Transylvania College, Lexington, 6-2960, 4-2944 

ext. 283 
Rose, Walter Scott, College Post Office, Union College, Bar- 

bourville 
Ross, J. Russell, East Hall, Western Ky. St. College, Bowling 

Green 
Rouse, Clyde, L., 620 Erlanger Rd., Erlanger, 341-6943, 341- 

7737 
Roy, Charles, 2629 N. Red Bank Rd., Evansville, Indiana, HA 

3-4664 
Rubarts, Leland G., Dunnville, 787-6099, 787-5094 
Rushing. Kenneth, Route No. 1, Paducah, 444-6886, 443-3631 
Russell, Allen W., 1503 Sycamore, Murray, PL 3-2832 
Kussea, Eugene "Eudy", 1106 Gallia St., Portsmouth, Ohio, 

EL 3-7663, EL 3-2103 
Russell, Joe, Box 213, Russellville, PA 6-6983, PA 6-6983 
St. Clair, Robert L, Jr., 6703 Norton Ave., Louisville 13, 969- 

1023, EM 6-0326 ext. 4 
Salisbury, Iranklin D., Box 402, Martin, BU 6-3375 
Sams, Glenn, Auburn, LI 2-6833 
Sanders, Mel, 3910 Sunset Ave., Paducah, 442-3650 
Sang, Bob, 4312 Gartin, Ashland 
Saturley, David, Route No. 6, Hopkinsville. TU 5-8395, TU 

6-6301 ext. 20 
Schad, Jim, 10717 Chelmsford Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, 825-3343 
Schatier, Gary R., 1113 Barton Ave., Louisville, EM 6-8646, 

921-1479 
Scharfenberger, Irv T., 7267 Jethve Lane, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

661-637S, 561-6378 
Schhch, Paul, 3315 Dean Drive, Louisville, GL 8-6765, TW 6-0211 
Schmitt, Paul E., 602 South 40th St. Louisville, SP 8-5356, ME 

6-6246 
Schnebelt, Carl R. Hanover, Indiana, UN 6-3581, UN 6-4561 
Schneider, Robert, 326 W. 19th St., Covington, 431-7395, 441- 

7100 
Schulte, Tom, 303 Patton Drive, Ashland, 5-3529, 4-6114 
Scott, Bill, 1816 McDonald Rd., Lexxington, 2-3316, 2-3695 
Scott, Clarence T., Walhns Creek, MO 4-2181, MO 4-3444 
Beibert, Billy Ray, P. O. Box 213, Dawson Springs, SW 7-2280, 

SW 7-2280 
Sellman, Jonn B., 4031 Gilman Ave., Louisville 7, TW 7-2757, 

J a 6-3393 
Settle, Evan E., 102 Alton Road, Shelbyvville, ME 3-1847, 

ME 3-4869 
Settle, Roy G., 1618 Sioux Place, Owensboro, MU 3-2136, MU 

3-3571 
Shaw, Karl, 121 Hagan Court, Lancaster, 792-2370, 648-2208 
Sheffer, Darreil L., 710 Dornell St., Owensboro, MU 4-4891 
Snerrow, Winston G. BeattyviUe, 464-2663 
ahewmaker, Wayne, 206 W. Meadow Drive, ClarksviUe, Tenn., 

647-4112, Ft. Campbell ext. 3320 
Shope, Lowell M. 13V9 Mittendorf, South Webster. Ohio, PR 

8-2426, BL 9-6601 
Showalter, John, Georgetown, 662, 1240 
Shumate, Robert T., 2802 Rosina, Covington. 431-7672, DU 

1-7000 ext. 622 
Siler, Clarence M., 8th Street, Williamsburg, 6188 
Simpkins, Robert L., Box 130, Meador, W. Va. 
Singleton, Vesper, Carr Creek, MI 2-3917, MI 2-3833 
Slone, Kay Douglas, North Broadway, Georgetown, 160 (Bus.) 
Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Farmview Ave., Louisville, GL 8-1286, 

EM 6-8746 
Smith, Thomas E., 11 Polster Dr., ' Evansville, Indiana, GR 

7-3302 
Smith, Wayne N., 106 Druien, Oampbellsville, 465-5268, Colum- 
bia, 384-2761 
Smith, Willard N., Box 23, Campbellsville, 465-6339, 465-4191 
Smith, William E., 4122 St. John's Terrace, Cincinnati 36, 

Ohio, 791-3082, 731-2341 ext. 266 
Smith, Wyatt Jack, 203 Ohio, Somerset, 679-1211 



Sosh, LaRue, 3rd Street, Uniontown, 100, 35 

Sosh, Nelson, 3rd treet, Uniontown, 123, 36 

South. William F., 180 Versailles Rd. Frankfort, CA 7-6565, 

CA 3-3441 
Spaulding, Stan, Waverly, Ohio, 816-M, 61 
Spencer, Irvin E., 10414 Sunlight Way, Valley Station, WE 

7-2300, WE 7-7865 
Spiceland. S. E., 305 South 13th St., Murray, 763-2811 
Stanfill, Robert, Louisa, 638-4014, Ashland 324-1111 ext. 600 
Staples, Charles, 1610 Lee Dr., Henderson, 827-3174 
Staples, James E., 303 Preston, Glasgow, 661-8190, 651-2196 
Staten, Jimmie F., Tollesboro 
Steenken, William R., 1636 Highland Pike, Covingtno, 331- 

3789, 431-3108 
Stephens, Herbert D., 133 1st Street West, Ceredo, W. Va., 

GL 3-2628. HA 9-1381 
Stephenson, Harry, 2210 Circle Drive, Lexington, 4-9620, 5-2960 

ext. 284 
Stephenson, Thomas H. 946 North 26th St., Paducah, 443-6102, 

442-4898 
Stethen, James E., Box 134, Bedford, 255-3286, Madison, Ind. 

1150 
Stevens, Alex, 616 Highfield. Danville, 236-4730, 236-6211 
Stevenson, Forrest, South Portsmouth, YE 2-4109 
Stewart, Herbert, 330 Maple St., Hazard, GE 6-2438. GE 6-2438 
Stiff, Maurice, Jr., 2160 Glenworth, Louisville, 464-7808, JU 

5-2995 
Stikeleather, Clyde Lewis, 201 Goff Drive, Leitchfield, 269- 

3885, 269-3387 
Stines. Ray A., London, 864-5001, 864-2610 

Stinson, Charles L., Maple St., Horse Cave, ST 6-2711, ST 6-7131 
Stinson! John M., Bowling Green 
Stith Houston, Box 93, Route No. 2, Ehzabethtown, 765-4737, 

765-6957 
Stokes, Tommy G., Route No. 3, Madisonville, TA 1-6176 
Stone, William, 287 Bassett, Lexington, 6-6216, 6-6194 
Strain, Richard P., Box 47, North Trailer Park, Ft. Knox, 

Straub^^Charfes, 930 East 2nd St., Maysville, 564-6096, 564-3781 
Strong, Arnett, 116 Ky. Blvd., Hazard, GE 6-3938, GE 6-2141 
Suffill. Bob, Drakesboro. GR 6-2939 . 

Sugg, Johnnie Dean, Route No. 6, Box 26, Hopkinsville. lU 

6-4798, TU 6-4431 , . 

Sullivan, Don Chris, 3020 Dartmouth Drive, Lexington, 7-6953, 

Frankfort CA 3-8221 ext. 61 
Swann Randall, 110 South 9th St., Central City. 426-W 
Swinfo'rd. John, 440 East Pike. Cynthiana, 205, 1887 
Switzer. Richard J., Jr.. 1628 Banklick St., Covington, 581- 
0158, 241-1090 

Tackett, Donald B., 4519 Second St., South Shore, YE 2-4276 
Tackett. Harold, Box 68, Olive Hill, FA 6-7211 
Tackett, Jay, Route No. 3, Georgetown, 6653, 6663 
Tackett, Layne, Box 51, Dorton 
Tarlton, Thomas O., 5608 Rustic Way, Louisville. WO 9-5637, 

EM 6-9561 , ,„„„ 

Tarvin Roger Wayne, 13 Woodland Ave., Ft. Thomas, HI 1-1232 
Taylor,' Robert S., 4209 Hewitt, Louisville, GL 8-4293, ME 4-1681 
Thomas, Charles, 410 E. Drive, Fulton, 1948, 6 
Thomas, Frank M., 620 South 10th St., Louisville 3, 583-6354, 

JU 4-9178 
Thomas, Leo Anthony, Second Street, Aberdeen, Ohio, 795- 

Thompson, Arthur Lee, P. O. Box 2003, Pikeville, GE 7-4479, 

GE 7-9141 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga Drive, Louisville 5, GL 2-9255 
Thompson, Ralph N., 649 Ivy Hill, Cincinnati 38, Ohio, BL 

1-3394, CH 1-2926 
Thompson, Thomas A., 3436 Greentree Rd., Lexington, 6-8921, 

2-6008 
Tirey, Lt. Col. James H., U. S. A. M. B., Ft. Knox, 4-3562, 

4-8569 
Tinsley, Marion Francis, Box 447, Central City, 1721, 321 
Todd, Lonnie H., Route No. 2, Madisonville, 821-5028, TA 

1-6862 
Todd, W. O., Jr., Route No. 3, Eubank, 678-8021 (Bus.) 
Tolley, Harold B., North 18th Ext., Murray, PL 3-6631, 395- 

4181 
Troutman, Doyle C, Box 304, Harlan, 1937, 77 
Tuck, Lillard Ochell, Glasgow, 3331, 3811 
Tucker, Neal R., 121 Woolridge Rd., Hopkinsville, 885-5492, 

BR 1-2020 
Tucker, Roscoe, Jr., G-6 Batewood, Danville, 236-4520, 236- 

2200 
Turner, Jack, 11 Sweetbriar, Florence, 283-1623, 283-3361 
Tyre, Donald C, 225 Rolling Acre Drive, Frankfort, 223-3668, 

7-2231 ext. 361 
Vance Hunter, Jr., 1270 Kentucky St., Bowling Green, VI 

3-6758, VI 2-3631 
Vannerson, Duke, Route No. 2, Paducah, 442-3600, 444-9439 
Vanover. Walter S., 1101 Jefferson, Evansville, Indiana, HA 

3-1974, HA 4-6481 ext. 214 
VanSant, William E., 101 Holaday Lane, So. Ft. Mitchell, DI 

1-6087 
Van Zant, Jim, Box 802, Williamson, W. Va. 
Vaughan, Ronald G., Freeburn, 456-3633, 466-3914 
Vaughn, Melvin, Route No. 6, London, 864-5714, 864-2220 
Vermillion. Charles D., 103 Bishop St., Corbin, 3136 
Vescovi, Raymond B., 3626 Laurel Ave., Evansville, Indiana, 

HA 3-8144, WO 3-3124 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1962 



Does Your Present Student 
Policy Cover Your Athletes? 



We Can Solve Your Problem. 



^Ue KiH<fde*t Qo4nfia4Uf> 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 2-8522 



Vettiner, Charlie. 450 Armory Place, Jefferson Play. & Eec. 

Bd.. Louisville, JU 3-2618 
Vinciguerra, Philip Matewan, W. Va. 
Vinson. Ray T. McRoberts 
Vipperman, Al, Ransom, GA 7-2S10 
Vowell, Darrell, 224 Clinton, Hickman, 2806, 2019 
Wagner, Marvin Rudy, Route No. 1, Box 455, Pikeville, GE 

7-4611 
Waide, Harry D., 250 East Arch, Uadisonville, TA 1-1998, 

TA 1-3870 
Walker, Paul R., 625 Meadow Lawn, Bowling Green, VI 3-8893, 

VI 3-8326 
Wallace, James E.. P. O. Box 133, McKee, AT 7-2547 
Wallen. Howard W., Williamsport, 789-306S, 789-6050 
Waller, Bobbie E., 161 St. William, Lexington, 6-8762, 6-8762 
Ward, Jack, 1909 Circle Ave., Owensboro, MU 3-4147, MU 



Approved and Certified Football Officials 

Receiving Certified Rating 

McCollum, Bob 



n 7-3805. 7-9264 
■e, OwensNoro, 683-8725, 
Independe 



356-2329, 



1300, 298 



4-6250 
Ward. Robert, 307 Southside, Hender 
Warner, Marvin, Nancy. 678-4844 
Watkins, Paul D. 1706 Navajo D 

683-3576 
Watson. Clifford L., 66 McCuUun 

397-1529 
Way. James. 211 W. Penn. Cynthian 
Webb. Jerry B.. Auburn. 542-6472 
Weaver. Ray. 55 Thompson. South Fort Mitchell, 331-3761 
Weber, John. 3204 Watson. Covington, 291-8662 
Welch. John H. Mayking. 633-2928 

Wells. Bobby W.. Box 41, Prestonsburg. TU 6-2101, TU 6.2252 
Wells. Milford James. 344 Bays Ave., Morehead, ST 4-57K1, 

Frankfort CA 7-2231 ext. 386 
Wesche. James A.. 427 Queensway Drive, Lexington, 6-726^, 

6-1288 
Westerfield, Glenn. 200 Washington, Evansville. Indiana. GR 

7-0637, HA 6-2247 
Westhoff, Robert A., 26 St. Jude. Florence. 283-2971. 371-6055 
Wheatley. Donald, 117 Payne. Lebanon, 692-4624. 692-3103 
White. David B., 237 Longview, Bowling Green. VI 3-3884, 

843-4331 
White. James "Pete", 401-C Smith Ave.. Cumberland 
White, J. L. 1928 Gary Ave.. Bowling Green, 2-2463. 3-9249 
Whitehouse. Donald L.. P. O. Box 451, 131 Alabama Ave., 

Wnichester, 744-3911 
Whitt, John, 158 Robin, Box 612, Russell 

(Continued in November ATHLETE) 



Official! 

Bennett, Howard 
Blanton, Homer 
Boyles, Jeriy F. 
Brown, George W. 
Caiman, E. C. 
Canter, John 
Davis, Clyde E. 
Durkin, Jack H. 
Elovitz, Carl 
Florence, Robert H. 
Forbes, J. W. "Jack' 
Fortney, Robert L. 
Gammon, W. H. 
Graham, James 
Hadden, Newell 
Hafferman, Bart 
Heinze, Frank 
Heinze, John G. 
Holeman, Fletcher 
Johnson, Bernard 

Official: 

Bond, Jack C. 
Brizendine, Vic 
Burton, John 
Carroll, James L. 
Craft, Bill 
Cuirent, Ray 
Da?i.^, Curt 
Edelsi;, Ben R. 
Greene, Paul Dutch 
Gruneisen, Sam J. 
Hagan, Joe 



McNabb, Edgar 
May, E. B., Jr. 
Mayhew, Wm. M. 
Mayo, Henry L. 
Mordica, William A. 
Mullins, B. E. 
Nau, Bill 
Noland, Doug 
Riggs, William T. 
Schmitt, K. F. 
Shaw, John H. 
Smith, Edgar, J. 
Stephenson, Harry 
Stone, Clifton 
Sullivan, Don C. 
VanMeter, David G. 
Wilson, John Pope 
Wood, Paul 

Receiving Approved Rating 

Holbrook, William 
Lenahan, Thomas F. 
Longenecker, David M. 
Nord, Ed 
Powell, Logan G. 
Sacra, Gresham 
Swirford, John 
VanHoose, Jack D. 
Watts, Shirley 
Welch, J. D. 
Wise, Billy V. 



Sutclif f e Has The 
Sifi^eaters and Jackets 

in Stock for Immediate Delivery 
With Lettering Service^ 10-Day Delivery 




SPECIAL SCHOOL PRICES ARE SHOWN 



V-NECK SLIP-OVER SWEATERS 

No. 1030 — A Sand Knitting Mills sweater of 100% wool 
in heavy baby shaker weave. Stock colors — Black, White, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Kelly, Old Gold, Cardinal; 
each - $12.95 

No. 530-CL — Another Sand sweater in solid white. 
Choice of cheerleaders, bands, etc. Also very popular 
as athletic awards. White only; each $9.85 

No. 30V— 100% wool. Stock colors— Black, Old Gold, 
Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Maroon, Kelly, Light Gold, 
Burnt Orange; each $10.35 



JACKETS — Write us for catalogue showing 
latest styles in Award and Class Jackets. 



BUTTON FRONT COAT STYLE SWEATERS 

No. 1020 — A Sand product of heavy baby shaker weave. 
100% pure wool yarn. Demanded by schools who want 
the best. Stock colors— Black, White, Royal, Scarlet, 
Purple, Cardinal, Kelly, Old Gold; each , $14.20 

No. 1520 — A companion sweater to the 58-W. Made 
by Sand in solid white coat style in medium weight. 
Sizes 34 to 46. White only. Colors are special order. 
This sweater is very popular with cheerleaders and 
bands. Each $12.95 

No. 2620J — A Sand Knitting Mills Heavy Jersey Weave. 
Button Front Coat Sweater — lOOyo pure wool and one 
of our most popular honor garments. Stock colors — 
Royal, Kelly, Scarlet, Black, Old Gold, White, Maroon, 
Purple; each ...$11.30 



WE OPERATE OUR OWN LETTERING DEPARTMENT 

LETTERING: 6" chenille letters, each $1.45; 8" letters $2.15; chenille bars, 50c each; 
chenille chevrons, 50c; name plates, 15c each. Delivery of woven service stripes 
in sleeves cost 35c additional per sweater and require three weeks for delivery. 



The SIJTCLIFFE CO. 

INCORPORATED 

LOUISVILLE h KENTUCKY 



PUMA for PERFORMANCE and more TOUCHDOWNS! 



THE ALL SPORTS SHOE 



HUNTS, 




FAKTORY PUMA 
Herzogenaurach 
West Germany 



Here's the story on PUMA shoes for football 
and other sports. Sweeping the country in 
a big way! You should buy some of these 
OXFORDS and try them NOW ! 

It's down right sensational to get all these 
advantages in a football shoe for Jess than 
$12.95 to $15.95 but the price is only 



$8.75 pr. 



Worn last year by the nation's No. 1 football 
team., and many others. 

PUMA LASTIG 

EXTRA LIGHT, about half the weight of a 
regular shoe. It's SHOCK-PROOF .... 
sole and cleats are PUMA-LASTIC which 
will outwear the shoe. 

TWICE the usual number of cleats! 14 on 
each shoe, giving more traction, more lateral 
stability. 



All cleats but 2 on each shoe are near the outer edge of the sole which means bet- 
ter body balance This and the universal last makes a better fitting shoe which 
feels better on the foot, avoids blisters, affords great comfort. 

CLEAT AND SOLE TROUBLE ELIMINATED! The cleats are molded to 
the sole. No cleats to get loose, give trouble. No post trouble. No steel plate to 
crack . . . and this means greater flexibility. Not a shoe for muddy field, but for 
normal conditions, it's great. While some schools have bought 50 pairs, we sug- 
gest you only buy a few and try them on backs, fast ends and see what happens. 



ORDER YOURS NOW 



prompt shipment while stock lasts. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 



CH. 7-1941 



MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



CH. 7-1942 




High School Athlete 

^ne iSpo^tsman s C^eea 



The Player,,, 



1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without boasting, he loses without excuses, and he never quits. 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 

The Coach , , , 

1. He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type man he wants his boys to be. 



The Ofiicial... 



1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
treatment for himself. 

4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 



The Spectator,,, 



1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct. 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports." 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
NOVEMBER - 19E2 



As We See Athletic Competition 

Editor's Note: The following talk was given by 
1st Vice-President Calloway Taulbee, of the National 
Association of Secondary School Principals, before one 
of the sessions of the 1962 National Federation An- 
nual Meetings. 

I recognize that the comments I shall make in 
addressing you represent a restatement ar,d reaffir- 
mation of those ideas you have expressed and heard 
on many occasions and believe in as strongly as I do. 
You are well aware of the increased and shifting 
emphasis with which we have been concerned during 
the past few years in curriculum development and 
improvement. The national emphasis on physical fit- 
ness spearheaded by the President, educators and 
parents throughout our country, in some measure, 
suggests another change and direction in curriculum 
content. 

As you well know, there is currently a tremen- 
dous amount of literature on the need for program 
improvement as it concerns the health and physical 
well-being of our students. Again, consider the 
President's statement issued some months ago under 
the heading "The Soft American" in which he declar- 
ed that the youth of the United States are in dire 
need of a rigorous physical fitness program. This 
represents the most timely comments ever express- 
ed on the subject. His statements have implications 
for the secondary schools. Our children must be able 
to meet the demands of the modern world when they 
grow up; they must be physically healthy in order 
to cope with the added tensions, stresses, mental job 
adjustments, professional competition and their re- 
sponsibilities as citizens, parents and community 
leaders. 

Life in America has changed. This is truly the 
pushbutton age. The movies took us away from home, 
the radio brought us back, and television has glued 
us there. Therefore, the importance of a physical edu- 
cation and an interscholastic sports program for our 
youngsters cannot be overemphasized when it is realiz- 
ed that such programs will have their greatest bene- 
fit ten or twenty years from now when these young- 
sters have matured and have become the leaders of 
government, industry, business, education, and other 
fields. 

These questions arise: Do the schools have a 
greater responsibility for the physical development of 
boys and girls? Should there be more physical educa- 
tion? Should there be a broader program of inter- 
scholastic athletics? 

During the past few years tremendous progress 
has been made in broadening and improving the aca- 
demic program in our schools at all levels. You are 
well aware of the fact that during this time we have 
not been without criticism and opposition emanating 
from those opposed to changes. Ironically enough, 
despite the apparent need for improved pi'ograms 
of physical education ahd athletics, there have been 
many attacks made upon these phases of education 
ana in some states standards relating to requirements 
actually lowered. In our own state during recent 
months, the interscholastic athletic program has been 
attacked by legislators and the tax-paying public. 

Thus far, reference has been made primarily to 
physical education. From here on my remarks will 
pertain to the interscholastic program of athletic 
competition. 

I. Principals generally support the philosophy 
that athletics is a part of education and a part of 
the learning process, based upon the following: 

A. We have definite evidence that participants 
grow physically, mentally, morally, spiritually, and 
socially through experiences made available through 
competitive athletics. 



B. If a boy playing on a team is not a better 
sportsman, a more thoughtful gentleman, and a more 
serious citizen at the end of the season, we need to 
examine the interscholastic program. 

C. There are learning situations presented 
through interscholastic sports far exceeding those 
found within the four walls of a classroom in any 
academic area. 

D. The program of athletics is for the physically 
gifted and this roughly represents 10 percent of the 
student body. Likewise, it provides additional ex- 
periences for the mentallv gifted. We as educators 
have stated that all individuals should be given equal 
opportunity for their optimum development through 
education; that all aspects of development should be 
stressed, including the mental, physical, emotional, 
and social. Some misconceptions, however, have pro- 
hibited the achievement of this goal. In the first place, 
some believe that superior mentality and superior 
physical development do not go together. Actually, 
youngsters who are highly endowed mentally seem 
more apt to have better physical development and 
better coordination than the average. In short, one 
can have both "brains and brawn." Each aspect may 
supplement and reinforce the other. 

A great deal of guessing has been going on for 
many years in regard to the academic quality of 
athletes. It has been all to common for many, in- 
cluding teachers, to dowoigrade athletes' scholastic 
efforts and abilities. Mr. Eidsmoe, head of the De- 
partment of Education and chairman of the Division 
of Social Sciences, Morningside College, Sioux City, 
Iowa, made a survey in Iowa which presented some 
interesting results. The survey was made of the 
academic standing of the twelve members of each 
basketball team in the Iowa 1960-61 Boys Substate 
and State Tournaments. The schools involved in these 
tournaments were chosen because their practice per- 
iods and training would be as intense as in any state. 
Here is what he found: 

Of the senior boys, grade average 2.622. The 
entire class grade average — 2.2 

Junior boys, grade average 2.551. Entire class — 
2.148. 

Sophomore boys, 2.381. E.-.tire class— 2.296. 

Freshman boys, 2.406. Entire class— 2.531. 

I believe we must concur that the program is 
also for the mentally gifted. 

II. We must recognize that some of the best 
teaching takes place in our interscholastic sports pro- 
gram. In fact, it has been said that the teachers in 
the academic fields rarely demonstrate the dedication, 
the zeal, the fervor and thoroughness evidenced by 
the coach. 

III. The program of athletics in our opinion is 
democracy in its truest form. No phase of education 
makes a greater contribution to the ideals of de- 
mocracy. An athlete may not be an All-American, 
but he is an example of the American way. He is 
judged not for his race, not for his religion, not for 
his social standing or his finances, but by the demo- 
cratic yardstick of how well he blocks, tackles, drib- 
bles, shoots, throws the javelin and so forth. 

IV. The interscholastic sports program provides 
outstanding experiences and training in competition. 

A. It is an essential ingredient in our democratic 
living ... it is a part of our way of life. 

B. Competition promotes individual expression 
and endeavor. We must bear in mind that the Ameri- 
can youth now competes against the youth of the 
entire world. 

V. A Competitive sports demand cooperation and 
teach athletes to work with others and to sacrifice 
self for the success of the team. There is no "I" in 
team, 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL XXV— NO. 4 



NOVEMBER, 1962 



$1.00 Per Year 



Spectator Sportsmanship 

(Delivered by Harold Harrison, Corres- 
pondent, The Associated Press, Cincinnati, 
at the Athletic Administration Section. Divi- 
sion of Men's Athletics, A.A.H.P.E.R. Con- 
vention, Cincinnati, Ohio, April 6, 1962.) 

Bad spectator sportsmanship is a bit like 
bad weather — we'll always have it with us 
at times. There always will be poor sports 
and bad actors among spectators. They are 
the belligerents who have tremendous cour- 
age — in the grandstand. They bad mouth 
players, officials and coaches because they 
know those persons, as a general rule, can't 
fight back. They are the show-offs who like 
to attract attention. 

Among them they incite other fans to 
similar bad sportsmanship. 

I don't believe this organization or any 
other can educate away or legislate away all 
such persons. 

I am going to put the hat also on school 
officials, particularly in the high school and 
the small college towns for their reluctance 
to weed out such characters. 

Those persons generally are known, par- 
ticularly in smaller towns, so I believe some 
relief could be obtained if the school officials 
would get up the courage to ban the habitual 
bad actors from all sports events. Put the 
fellow on the blacklist even if he is the 
mayor's cousin or the bank president's son. 

That won't cure the situation, of course, 
but it should help. 

The other sources I have in mind are the 
officials, the coaches, the rules makers — 
even the players in a small degree — and, 
if you please, some of the sports writers. 

Referring to basketball, I think one of the 
greatest evils that ever befell good sports- 
manship was when officials started be- 
coming ham actors. 

I can recall when we first began seeing 
basketball officials who shouted, waved their 
arms and went into all kinds of gymnastics 
in making calls. I can recall that I, among 
a lot of others, thought it was funny at the 
time. 

It isn't funny any more. 

More and more officials have gotten into 
the act and now it's a regular thing. Those 



officials by their antics make a simple un- 
intentional foul look only slightly less serious 
than mayhem or attempted murder. 

What happens? The more excitable fan 
sees the official in his act. The foul has been 
committed against a player on the fan's 
team and the very antics of the official make 
it appear the boy has been the victim of a 
serious crime so the uproar starts. 

The true sports fan, pays his admission 
charge to see the game — not an act by the 
officials. 

Again we come to school officials, the 
academic and administrative heads of ath- 
letis conferences. They could crack down. 
They could insist that officials be that and 
not John Barrymores. 

But I don't want to blame officials en- 
tirely. I wonder how long an official would 
last if he started ordering a high school or 
college coach off the premises for the kind 
of bad behavior that incites the fans. I'll bet 
he wouldn't get many assignments. 

Professional baseball doesn't have that as 
a serious problem. The fans get angry if a 
top player or manager is bounced from the 
game but the umpire knows he has the 
authority and exercises it. 

College and high school officials, I sup- 
pose, have the authority but I question whet- 
her the conference or association heads 
would back them up very solidly. 

Now I come to the coaches. The towel- 
throwing, table-kicking, floor-pounding coach 
is as much a cause of bad spectator sports- 
manship as the ham actor official. The fan 
has seen the referee put on his act, then sees 
the coach go into his, perhaps a player also 
looks pleadingly to the stands, saying by his 
expression, "I didn't do anything." 

The uproar starts among the spectators. 

I know it isn't human nature for a coach 
to sit blandly through a game without getting 
irked about some calls or some bad playing. 
Any coach has the right and the duty to pro- 
test but it can be done in such a manner 
that will not help to get Joe Fan in a lather. 

Officials claim many coaches go into 
such an act to cover up their own shortcom- 
ings or those of their players. I wouldn't be 
surprised if that is correct at times but it's a 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1962 



NOVEMBER, 1962 



VOL. XXV— NO. 4 



Published monthly, except Jane and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor . THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown 

Vice-President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan 

Directors — Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman 
Gish (1962-63). Greenville; Preston Holland (1961-65), Murray: 
Don R. Rawlings (19S1-65). Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1962- 
66). Louisville; Oran C. Teater (1960-64), Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



Jiom the Commissione'i s (Jffi 



ice 



REPORTS SOON DUE 

1. 1962 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



National Federation Basketball Test 

Part II of the National Fe(3eration bas- 
ketball examination will be given all over 
Kentucky on Monday, December 3, to offic- 
ials who wish to work for the "approve(i" 
and "certified" ratings. Officials registered 
with the K.H.S.A.A. for the first time this 
year and who have not been registered pre- 
viously in any other state association, are 
not eligible to take the test. Those interested 
should advise the State Office immediately 
in order that necessary arrangements can 
be made with the school administrators who 
will supervise the taking of the exam. Offic- 
ials living in Kentucky need not suggest 
the name of an examiner. The 'Approved" 
rating does not carry forward from year to 
year, but must be earned each year. After 
an official has received the "certified" rat- 
ing, he keeps this rating by attending clinics 
without having to continue to take the 
exam each year. 

Rules Changes in Swimming 

The following changes in the rules will 
be in effect for interscholastic swimming 
during 1962-63: 

1. 200- Yard Medley Relay (in 75-foot 
pools). 

160-Yard Medley Relay (in 60-foot 
pools) . 

2. 200-Yard Freestyle. 

3. 50-Yard Freestyle (in 75-foot pools). 
40-Yard Freestyle (in 60- foot pools). 

4. 200-Yard Individual Medley (in 75- 
foot pools). 

160-Yard Individual Medley (in 60- 



foot pools). 

5. One-Meter Springboard Diving. 

6. 100-Yard Butterfly. 

7. 100-Yard Freestyle. 

8. 100-Yard Backstroke. 

9. 400-Yard Freestyle. 

10. 100-Yard Breaststroke. 

11. 200-Yard Freestyle Relay (in 75-foot 
pools). 

Note from K.H.S.A.A. Swimming Committee: 
The events listed above are for Class A meets. Added 
to the Class B State Swimming Meet this year will be 
the 200-Yard Freestyle and the 100-Butterfly. The 
400- Yard Freestyle is the only event in the Class A 
meet which is not scheduled for the Class B meet. 

Rule II, Section 2-d: The springboard 
must be installed so that the board is level 
through the fulcrum be moved to varying 
positions. 

Rule III, Section l-c-4: At the starter's 
discretion, any time prior to the discharge of 
the pistol, he may order the contestants to 
"stand up." 

Rule III, Section 9-a: In all swimming 
races, each contestant shall have finished 
the race when any part of his person touches 
the end of the pool or intersects the vertical 
plane indicated by the end of the pool when 
the prescribed distance have been covered. 

Rule V, Section 1-b: For championship 
meets, a meet committee shall be designated. 
This committee shall be responsible for the 
conduct of the meet and shall have authority 
to act in any situation not specifically cover- 
ed by the rules of procedure and shall have 
discretionary power to set aside the applica- 
tion of a rule when there is apparent unfair- 
ness. 

Rule V, Section 2-a: In dual meets, the 
referee shall have discretionary power to 
set aside he application of a rule when there 
is apparent unfairness. 

Rule V, Section 4-a : Although the f ollow- 
procedure is specified for championship 
meets, it is strongly recommended for dual 
meets. The three timers for each lane shall 
be placed directly over their assigned lanes 
at the finish. The alternate time only shall 
take split times. 

Rule V, Section 5-a and b: The four 
judges of the finish shall be designated as 
lane judges. Each judge must record the 
highest place his lane contestant actually 
may have attained. If there is disagreement 
among the judges, the timers' opinion as to 
whom they timed shall be asked and each 
will be given a vote to determine the winner. 
(The time recorded will not be considered). 
Rule VI, Section 3-b: In championship 
meets, the official entry cards for the meet 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1B62 



Page Three 



will be presented to the coach or his duly 
appointed representative upon receipt of his 
signature. The official entry cards must 
then be deposited in the designated box for 
each event at any time prior to the scratch 
deadline (as listed in Conduct of N.C.A.A. 
Championships — 6. Time of Meet). After 
the listed deadlines, no entries will be 
accepted. 

Rule VI, Section 5-a: Contestant's cos- 
tume must be so cut as to be decent, com- 
pletely cover the buttock, and provide that 
the waistline and leg line are approximately 
parallel when viewed from the side. 

Rule VIII, Section 1-a: At the conclusion 
of all swim-offs for any given event, there 
must be a full complement of finalists. 

Rule IX, Section 1 : Only the performance 
of the first place finisher will be recognized 
as the record time. ((This means that even 
if the second place time is faster, first place 
will still be awarded the record). 

Rule XI, Section 1-k: A diver hitting the 
board during the execution of his dive may 
not receive an award in excess of deficient 
(4.5 points) from any judge. 

Rule XII, Section 1-g: In the tuck posi- 
tion, the body should be as compact as possi- 
ble, with the toes pointed. 

Rule XII, Section 1-h: In dives with 
twists, the twist may be performed at any 
time during the dive at the option of the 
contestant. 

Rule XII, Section 1-i: In somersaults 
with tuck (other than flying somersaults), 
the turn must commence as soon as the con- 
testant leaves the board. In flying somer- 
saults, the layout position must be maintain- 
ed from the take-off until the body has 
rotated to one-half somersault before enter- 
ing the spinning position. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
RFGISTET?Fn FOOTBALL OF^I«"TALS 

■t ■ Jif "D^ telephone number is given for an official listed 
It IS the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are gvien. the frist number is that of the home 
phone. 

Cook, Walter E., 6012a Gorgas Ave., Ft. Campbell, 472, 3408 

Gibson, Fred W., 1720 2nd St.. Henderson 

Grace. H. E., Jr., M''ddlesboro. 4, Pineville 7-3320 

Hall, Henry N., 502 Clinton, Georgetown, 2188, 5-3600 ext. 2605 

Kercber, Norman, 3126 Marlin Road, Louisville, GL 2-2969, GL 

2-2969 
Lee. Charles J., 315 Scott Ave.. Lexington, 2-3"03 
Minta, John Henry, 326 West Carter, Clarksville, Indiana, FtJ 

3-8553, JU 2-3571 
Omer. Harold G.. 150 North Crestmoor, Louisville 6, TW 6-4170, 

SP 8-4421 ext. 206 
Perry, Alfred L., USAARMC, Trans. Office, Fort Knox, 4-2149 

(Bus.) 
Sacra, Gresham, 920 Darley Drive, Lexington, 2-6036, 2-2220 

ext. 2244 
Bailee, Alan L., Ath. Dept., Villanova University, Villanova, 

Penna., GL 1-6478 
Saylor, Ben H., 312 Vandorn St., Corbin, 2187, 2187 
Seivy, Curt, 108 17th St., Corbin, 2422, 1333 
Sparks, Lester R. Rasnick St., Cumberland, 589-4513 (Bus.) 
Swope, William W., 438 Price Rd., Lexington 
Williams, Jerry R., 1237 Belmar, Louisville, 368-8613, JU 2-3511 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
K.H.S.A.A. building, Lexington, on Saturday 
afternoon, October 6, 1962. The meeting was 
called to order by President K. G. Gillaspie 
at 2:00 with all Board members, Commission- 
er Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Commis- 
sioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by 
Ralph C. Dorsey, that the reading of the 
minutes of the July 28th meeting be waived, 
since the members of the Board had re- 
ceived copies of these minutes. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner gave a report on the 
recent balloting in Section 2 for the Robert 
P. Forsythe replacement. The votes were 
as follows: 0. J. Allen, 7; Bowman Daven- 
port, 4; Sherman Gish, 15; W. M. "Mossy" 
Martin, 3; Lawrence L. McGinnis, 4; W. P. 
Wheeler, 2. President Gillaspie welcomed to 
membership on the Board Supt. Sherman 
Gish of the Muhlenberg County Schools. 

The Commissioner asked Assistant Com- 
missioner J. B. Mansfield to give a report 
on the football playoffs. Mr. Mansfield com- 
plied, and there was a general discussion of 
the districts and regions to be set up for 
the 1963 and 1964 football seasons. Mr. 
Mansfield recommended that for 1963 and 
1964 Class AA teams shall represent the 
schools with an enrollment of more than 326 
in grades 10-12, and Class A are those with 
a school enrollment of 326 or less in grades 
10-12, the classifications to be based on 
1961-62 enrollments. The Commissioner also 
asked Mr. Mansfield to recommend Class A 
and AA districts in the regions for 1963 
and 1964. The recommendations were made. 
Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Ralph 
C. Dorsey, that the recommendations made 
by the Assistant Commissioner and approved 
by the Commissioner be accepted and made 
a part of the football regulations. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

There was a discussion concerning the 
advisability of setting the site for the 1964 
State High School Basketball Tournament. 
Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Don R. 
Rawlings, that the 1964 State High School 
Basketball Tournament be held in Lexington. 
T'.fessrs. Teater, Rawlings, Gillaspie, and 
Thornton voted "Aye", and Messrs. Sanders, 
Dorsey, Gish, and Holland voted "No". Oran 
C. Teater moved, second by SheiTnan Gish, 
that the 1984 State High School Basketball 
Tournament by held in Lexington, the 1965 
tournament in Louisville, and that the al- 
ternating plan be continued providing satis- 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1962 



factory arrangements can be made each year 
by the Commissioner and the Board of Con- 
trol, the plan to remain in effect until 
changed by majority vote of the Board of 
Control. The motion was carried unanimous- 
ly- 

The Commissioner brought to the atten- 
tion of the Board the case of James Vorhees, 
currently enrolled at the Highlands High 
School. The boy and his guardians, Mr. and 
Mrs. James Palmer with whom he had lived 
for several years, had moved to Fort Thomas 
in August. He had attended school previous- 
ly at the St. Thomas High School and at New- 
port Catholic High School, but had not been 
a resident of Fort Thomas at the time. The 
Commissioner stated that he had declared 
James Vorhees ineligible under a strict in- 
terpretation of the Residence Rule, but that 
his recommendation was that the Board de- 
clare the boy eligible as of December 1, 1962, 
at the Highlands High School under author- 
ity given the Board in Article IV, Section 
3-d-7, of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution. Don R. 
Rawlings moved seconded by Foster J. San- 
ders, that the recommendation of the Com- 
missioner be accepted and that James Vor- 
hees be declared currently eligible at the 
Highlands High School as of December 1, 
1962. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Don 
R. Rawlings, that the next meeting of the 
Board be held in Lexington, on December 22, 
1962. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by 
Preston Holland that all bills of the Associa- 
tion for the period beginning July 28, 1962, 
and ending October 5, 1962, be allowed .The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meet- 
adjourned. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Adams, Lucian, 813 Palatka Eoad, Louisville 14, EM 8-9989, 

WE 7-23'0 
Adkins, Bill 200 South Ky., Corbin, 2894, 742 
Alexander. Claudis. 4412 Taylor Blvd., Louisville, 454-7511 



Allen, Ed L.. Transylvania College, Lexington 
Allen, Joe, 828 Stanley St., Hopkinsville, TU (5-2600 
Almond, Alvin. College High. Bowling tJreen 
A,pdorson, Kinklo, Apartment. No. 37. Anderson Court. PadU'-'ah 
Aimstvour- Jamcc William 1021 Ho"'cli, Horkir.cvill? TU 
(■■C-f'J. TU 5-S2:S 

AMciii!, c-=mu=! 11., Cjihcun, ■-:-:::3 

Pen V.., IIOCC G-D.HCI. liz.ll 'zci, Vz.:icy Zt-'Az^. 



W L 



Hifhlu'. 



Montic:;!!^. ^-ii i'-j&l 



Bilk,-. Ti.wc; T. 

348-2266 

Bnll...i! .J-..ck H , 128 Fine St., Baibour- ilk , S16-448J, B16-S210 
Bauc-m, Manin Eugeue, 401 Chelilvn, Hopkinivillfe, TU 6-7048 
Bell Henry Bu--T[?tt 960 "i»ave!h-, Lexington, 2-5861 2-944 
I'ell, Jimmj E , 8C5 Sunnvlanc, Mu.-raj 753-2:-06. 'e'l-eOai 
Jcv..uf Belt xi.; l-l Doiij D.ive. Ctvi-ftoi.. JU :-il-l, HL 



Bentley, James, Shelby Gap 

Berkeley. Edmund C, Box 284, Wayland, 358-3641 

Bibbs, William C, 2416V' St. Ann, Owensboro, MU 3-8973, 

MU 4-5261 
Bickers, Homer G., 172 Winding Way, Frankfort, 3-0253 
Black, Amos, Moreland Ave., Harrodsburg, 734-4775, 734-4195 
Borden. W. B. Jack, Cave City, 773-3364, 773-3671 
Bosch. Bill, P. O. Box 402, Cumberland. 848-2994, 848-5486 
Boyd, Jerry A., 113 Divins Court, Richmond, 623-4428 
Bradford. Earl E., 218 Marion Drive, Glasgow, OL 1-3835, 

OL 1-2256 

Bill. Jr., 203 Goodwin St., Corbin, 2594. 504 
Robert Allen, 282 Longview Drive. Bowling Green, 

VI 3-6648 
Breeden. Charles William, Mt. Washington, 538-4897, TW 5-4466 
Bridges. Bennie E., North Middletown, 362-4403 
Briscoe, Hubert, Route No. 3, Shelbyville, ME 3-4669, ME 3-2543 
Browder, Homer Lee, 147 Maple St., Henderson, VA 6-2123, 

VA 7-1838 
Brown, Jackie, P. O. Box 366, Russell Springs, 866-2292 
Brown, James W.. 102 Bristol Drive, Richmond, 623-2276. 

Lexington 2-2200 Ext. 2159 
Brown, Richard A., 972 Tearose Drive, Lexington, 7-4957, 

5-3880 ext 226 
Browning, Earl E., 8715 Blossom Lane, Louisville 7, 452-2937. 

239-3267 
Brummett, Joseph W., P. 0. Box 176, Danville, 236-2168 
Bruner, Jack C. Route No. 5, London, 864-4322, 864-2166 
Burchett, Lanier, Martin Court, Stanford. 365-2581. 365-2126 
Burdette. Wally, 1514 Oleanda Ave., Louisville 15, EM 6-6559 
Burns. Randol G.. 100 Ramsey Addition, Richmond, 623-2656 
Butcher, Granville ■•BO", Williamsport 
Butler, Bob, 688 So. Seminary, Madisonville, TA 1-5999 
Butts. Delbert L.. 107 Sterling, Mt. Sterling, 1313. 864R 
Byassee, Jack E., Route No. 2, Box 26A, Elizabethtown, RO 

6-4417, RO 6-6118 
Cain, William Ronald. 3510 Goldsmith Lane, Seneca High 

School, Louisville 
Campbell. George H., Jr., 116 Winchester. Middlesboro, 866. 122 
Campbell, John, Jr., Garrett, 368-3461 (Bus.) 
Campbell, Leonard, 2780 Clays Mill Road, Lexington, 7-7466 
Cantrell. Hubert E.. Campton. NO 8-3456, NO 8-3456 
Caple, Harold E., 318 Poplar, Ludlow, AX 1-6491 
Carpenter, Arthur, Stanville, 8-9356 (Bus.) 
Carpenter, Leonard F., Salyersville, FI 9-3403, FI 9-3564 
Carroll, Joe E., Falcon, 9-3194 (Bus.) 
Carter, Robert, Georgetown, Indiana, 145-02 
Castle, Jack T.. Route No. 2, Pikeville, GE 7-4367, SK 4-8184 
Gates, Tommy, 783 Plainview Drive. Madisonville, TA 1-1821 
Chanev, Rex, 304 West Sun, Morehead, ST 4-5993, ST 4-4181 

ext. 63 
Chattin, Charles, 2325 Harrod St., Ashland. 324-5385, 324-6464 
Chandler, Jim T., Apt.. No. 3, 160 Thierman Lane, Louisville 7. 

895-5566, TW 6-4231 
Clarke, Edward F.. 5746-A Allison, Fort Knox, 4-6770, 4-6162 
Conley, Ted L.. 4725 Nottingham Court, Ashland, EA 325-2920, 

EA 324-6343 
Cook. Walter E., 6012a Gorgas Ave., Ft. Campbell, 4472, 3408 
Cooksey. Marvin O., 6114 Loretta Ave., Louisville, WO 9-3586 
Cooper, John F.. 612 East 3rd St., Augusta 
Covey, Kenneth Harold. 695 Sheridan Drive. Lexington 
Cowles, Harold, Route No. 1, Bowling Green 
Cox, Ralph, Box 555, Benham, 689-4792. 848-2016 
Cox. Rufus, A., 305 Rutter, Earlington, TA 1-3606, DU 3-3301 
Crawford, Donald R., 306 E. Maple St., Nicholasville, TU 

5-4751 (Bus.) 
Cummins. Ray E., Box 41, Crittenden, 824-4485 
Dalton, Ray H., 4707 Dohn Road, Louisville 16, 447-3449 
Daniels. Billy Oliver, Southern Seminary, Box 126, Louisville 6, 

TW 5-1931, EM 8-5831 
Daugherty, Ernest, Anchorage, CH 1-4166 
Davenport, Bowman, Box 62, Clarkson, 242-3061 (Bus.) 
Davenport, Robert B., Shakertown Road, Burgin, 748-6204, 

748-5180 
Davis, Harold T., Route No. 3, Beaver Dam 
Davis. Ralph C, 604 North 4th St., Ironton, Ohio, JE 2-86"C, 

JE 2-8143 
Devine, Robert Earl, 1425'/. Park St., Bowling Green 
Downing, David M., 1728 Quarry Road, Louisville, GL 8-3884, 

363-2437 
Duvall, Thomas Jay, Sr., 5106 Doyle Drive, Louisville 16. 

447-3032, ME 7-1421 ext. 268 
Draughn, Bartram, Hindman, ST 5-4846 
Duff, Eari, Hardburly, 6-2307 

Dutton, Henly C, Williamsport, 789-4717, 789-4717 
Eastridgc. Bobbv A . Route No 1. Campbellsville. 465-5014. 

k;,:. n-.T 

rii:i; -. T '" ^ , 1 : ; ' . ■. ).:i. Ccu:!.- OT.cnsbcic. MU 



.•(■., 1 1 I. , , . h . , .ui-iH- (if --;b_!; ,Eui:.; 

t.. int. Wiiyii. 'J , jjcclim^l t, GL 6-8ii29, GR 6-2042 
Fallon. Robert J., 101 Cleveland, Hazard, 436-4628, 436-2151 
lyncher, Willi.<im D.. 1312 W. Main St., Box 1106, Murray, 

753-4794 
Failee, Harold "Butch". 2720 Field Ave., Louisville, TW 3-3201 
TV 7-24"0 
1 I '■ , j---.y .r . 'J9 Kalj. it H:..-tlcid, 29f 3456, 298 i221 
-'i-ilLy, H'J.., El^C Ifji-.k'ni; E.ivi, jCtii-J-.-ili--. .__b-;;UU, Eli-ioiC 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1962 



Page Five 



Flynn, Robert D., 1708 Charleston Court, Lexington, 4-7924, 

7-5734 
Francis. GeorKe. Sassafras, GE 6-3436 

Francis, Wendell, 419 Milton Ave., Glasgow, 651-5687, 651-3111 
Frey, William R., 23 Rob Roy. Fort Thomas. ST 1-0333 
Fritz, Sherman, 122 Meadowlark Drive, Richmond 623-4956, 

623-3424 
Fugate, E. Hugh, 258 Harrod Ave.. Frankfort, 223-1340, 227- 

9661 ext. 335 
Fyffe, Robert G., Box 9, Stoney Fork 
Gabbard, John B., 320 North Hill St., London, 864-5915, 864- 

2863 
Gibson. Fred W., 1720 2nd St., Henderson 
Gibson. Kenneth L., 4007 South Fifth St., Louisville, 366-0758, 

JU 7-1121 ext. 304 
Giordano, Al, 107 Ratliff, Princetno, EM 5-5680, EM 5-5615 
Glavsbrook, James, 661 Hodge, Madisonville, TA 1-2596 
Goff, Reathel, Hardyville 

Goley, Jim, Cayton Road, Florence, 283-2009. 291-5447 
Goode, Earl Allan, 1517 Versailles Road, Lexington, 5-2893, 

7-6115 
Gover, David Barrett, Bronston, 561-4573, 561-4250 
Coins, Herman. Second St.. Williamsburg 
Grace, H. E., Jr., Middlesboro, 4, Pineville 7-3320 
Graham, Jim, 4505 Blackburn Ave., Ashland, 4-8169 
Green, Joseph E., Route No. 5, Murray, PL 3-2834 
Griffin, Charles David, 233 Garr, Flemingsburg. 845-2923, 845- 

8011 
Guess, Kenneth E., Box 47, Hickman, 2207, 2095 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 942 Wolf Run Road, Lexington, 5-5332, 

2-7866 
Hagedorn, Thomas, 156 Clover Ridge, Ft. Thomas, HI 1-3973, 

KI 1-1800 ext. 1147 
Hamm, Michael R., 1611 Farmer Ave., Murray, PL 3-3616, 

PL 3-3616 
Hansel, Earl D. Star Route, Harlan, 365, 365 

Harned, Vic, 212 West Walnut, Leitchtield, 269-3835, 259-4196 
Harper, Bruce D., Route No. 5, Lexington. 6-6142, 6-6142 
Harville, Robert, 318 Mercer, Elizabethtown, 765-2277, 765- 

Hatfield, G. Dennis, 1610 May St., Covington, HE 1-4234, MA 

1-6675 
Hatfield, James, Box 37, Morehead, GA 7-8752, ST 4-4149 
Hatter, William F., 4211 Lafayette Court, Erlanger, 341-5139, 

621-6491 
Hawkins, Will A., Box 203, Cedar Hill, Tennessee, 2941 
Heitzman, Don L., 3616 Lincoln, Covington, HE 1-1239, HE 

1-0462 
Heldman, Dr. John, Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville 14, EM 

3-2181, ME 7-2531 
Henderson, Robert L., Route No. 1, Water Valley, FL 5-2201 
Henley, Jimmy Leon, Box 303, College Station, Murray 
Hennegan, J. E. Michael, 823 East Maple, Jeffersonville, Ind.. 

BU 2-5079, BU 2-1351 
Henry, Donald E., 1702 E. Main St., Cumberland, 589-4513, 

589-4513 
Henson, Tony C, Route No. 1, Water Valley, CH 7-5742 (Bus.) 
Hicks, Floyd E., 30 West 36th St., Covington, 431-1126, 731- 

2121 ext. 250 
Hinton, Henry, Sushn Drive, Box 3702, Louisville, WO 9-2873 
Hobbs, William Paul, 1665 Ryan Ave., Murray, PL 3-5614, 

PL 3-6614 
Hogan, Cleo C, Jr., Box 86, Park City, 749-2267 
Hogan, Waymon, Route 1, Franklin 
Holden, Frye H., 142 Tennyson Dr., Owensboro, MU 3-7814, 

MU 3-4561 
Hollingsworth. Ralph D., 804 South Main St., Springfield, 

Tenn., 384-6283, 384-6467 
Hopkins, Donald L., Route No. 1. Island, 736-2656, 843-9271 
Horn, Dick, 802 Hillcrest, Danville, 236-3962, 236-6373 
Horton, John, 7V> Columbia Ave., Monticello. 348-2236 (Bus.) 
Hoskins, Boyd, Jr„ Kettle Island, ED 7-3786, ED 7-3382 
Houchin, William B., 2645 Fureen Drive, Louisville 18, GL 

1-3378, CE 9-3267 
Howard, Henry Dewayne, Kettle Island, 7-2996, 7-2744 
Howard, Ledger, 905 Crest, Corbin, 3248, 462 
Howard, Oscar D., East Bernstadt 
Hudnall, William E., 313 Creekview Drive, Paris, 987-1641, 

Georgetown 2002 
Hughes, Paul P., South Lake Drive, Prestonsburg, TU 6-6771, 

TU 6-2170 
Hull, Joel L., 123 South Central, Somerset, 679-1674, 8-6390 
Hummer, Irby, 206 College, Hodgenville, 368-3000, 358-3009 
Huter, Jim, 3643 Vermont, Louisville, SP 6-0707, Henryville, 

Ind. 796-6315 
Idol, Billy Joe, 124 Leafwood Road. Middlesboro 
Jenkins, Douglas, P. O. Box 149, Wayland 
Johnson, Jack D., McKinney, 346-3856 

Johnson, James M., 632 Blade, Fiankfort, CA ' ''"ICv CA : ;:'" 
Jones, Robert T., 327 Cai-vel Court. Majisom ille, TA l-60bB 

(Bus.) 
King, Bob, 119 South 39th St., Louisville, SP 8-4660, SP 8-2761 
King, Russell, 943 Whitney Ave., Lexington, 4-3049, 2-2370 
Kuster, William, 533 17th St., Tell City, Indiana, KI 7-2109, 

KI 7-4576 
Lacer. Stanley O., Spottsville, VA 7-6962, VA 7-9444 
Laubheimer, Donald Travis, 3620 Henrj' Ave., Louisville, 366- 

3880, JU 4-0133 
Lav,renco, Alvin L,, ll'-Zs -Uta Vista, Walter., -185-1612, -V' 

:-J(OTO c-xt. 4K 



Lawson, Leiand, 949 DePorres, Lexington. 4-1009, 2-3044 

Lawson, Rondall, Route No. 1, Box 482, Pikeville 

Lawson, Rondell, Garrett 

Lay, William B., 1621 Lindy Lane, Lexington, 2-6829, 2-2250 

ext. 2668 
Lee, Robert L., 6810 Dartmoor Drive, Louisville 7, 425-3863, 

TW 5-2431 
Lee, William. Wallins Creek. MO 4-3444, MO 4-3621 
Lehkamp, Ken, 749 South Ft. Thomas, Fort Thomas, 441-1476, 

697-8181 
Liles. Bill, Route No. 8. Paducah, 898-2031 

Litke. Walter, Auburn High School, Auburn, LI 2-4181 (Bus.) 
Louden, Hubert C, 332 Scout Street, Louisville, GL 1-9796, 

TU 7-8411 
Magruder, Earl, 4100 Pixley Way, Louisville, WO 9-7045 
McAlister, Ronald D., 501 W. Stateline. Fulton, 1833-J 
McCauley, John E., 208 Paddock Road, Clarksville, Tenn., 645- 

6296, 647-1601 
McClure, William Scott, 404 College St., London, 864-5669, 864- 

McGinnis, .James. 314 Pope Lick Road, Middletown. CH 5-5075, 

JU 4-3211 ext. 634 
Maines, George, 3418 Terrace Dr., Erianger. 341-7460, 421-4454 
Mallory. David L., 206 Plum St., Princeton, 5-2688, 6-2051 
Mann, L. Mac. Box 133. Greenville, TU 6-7500, 269 
Marlette, Ronald L., 294 South 2nd St., Richmond. 623-1518, 

623-9948 
Martin. Robert E., 429 Chestnut, Henderson, VA 6-3833 
Mastin, Daryl, Mt. Olivet 
Maxwell, Harry E.. Jr., Apt. No. 44 Lincoln Court, Paducah, 

443-4628, 442-2711 
Mayes, Edward, 838 Crossbill Road, Danville, 236-3264, 236-6131 
Maynard, Lonnie, Majestic, GL 6-3633 
Meadors, Bill, 1811 Freeman, Owensboro, MU 4-7111, MU 

Miller, Ferrel, Route No. 1, Murray, 435-4653 

Miller, L. O., Jr., 2309 Kentucky Ave., Paducah, 2-0014, 4-6311 

ext. 342 
Mitchell. Jim, Route No. 4, Harrodsburg, 734-4464, Lexington, 

2-6383 
Montgomery, Don, First St., Box 11, Burgin, 748-6682, 236-5847 
Montgomery, Joe, Route No. 2, Mt. Olivet, Carlisle 574J1 
Moore. Arnold D., 2017 Winchester Ave., Ashland, 325-4188, 

324-0249 
Moore, Roy, Jr., P. O. Box 28, London, 864-6023. 864-2246 
Morgan. Henry. 145 Mackey, Williamsburg, 6363 
Mudd. Leon. 603 Church St., Bowling Green, VI 2-1764 
Mullins, Arthur, Elkhorn City, SK 4-4041, SK 4-6981 
Mulligan, J. T.. 427 Center, Erianger, 341-5628, 341-5628 
Munrath, Roy A., 932 John St., Covington. JU 1-2759, DU 

1-2200 ext. 419 
Murphy. Leo T., Jr.. 222 McCready, Louisville, TW 7-2277, 683- 

1723 
Napier, Walter, Box 199, Loyall, 1906-W, 753 
Neal, Marion, 2215 8th St., Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 3-3948, EL 

3-4401 
Nelson, Bernard L., 613 Lock Ave., Louisa, 638-4565, Ashland 

324-0710 
Nelson, William Odell, Greenville, 1095 
Newman, Earl B., 602 5th St., Paintsville, 789-4227 
Newnam, Luther G., Beattyville, 464-2560, 464-8132 
Newsom, Lawrence, 1405 Raleigh Road, Lexington, 4-4431, 

4-9116 
Nickell, Carl Duane, 2009 Broad St., Paducah, 444-6095, 

Metropolis, 111. 6602 
Nie. Allen F.. 1031 Isabella. Newport, AX 1-6847, CO 1-1725 
Noble, Leonard, 439 Court, Jackson, 666-2430, 666-2887 
Nord, Ed, 1734 South 23rd St., Louisville, SP 4-1958, TW 6-3401 

ext. 202 ... 

Nunn, Wesley L., Star Route, Brandenburg, 422-3326, 422-4660 
Oaks, Gary Lee, 231 Walnut St., Glasgow, 651-2782 
Pack, Donald, 163 Backstreet, Box 145, Fleming, Neon, Ky., 

7708, 2851 
Pack, Ervin B., Meadow Drive, Harlan, 2844, Evarts 147 
Parsons, W. E., 200 Garrett, Lexington, 4-3823, 5-4966 
Pate, Roy E., Route No. 1, Henryville, Indiana, 796-6196, 796- 

6255 
Payne, Gayle, Bethlehem, 878-6980 

Pearson, Bobby Neal, Beechmont, Drakesboro GR 6-8170 
Pelphrev, Jack D., Box 64, Paintsville, 789-4216 
Penrod. Joe B., 1203 Locust, Owensboro, MU 3-8773, MU 4-1176 
Perry. George B., Route 2, Princeton, EM 5-2633, EM 5-5615 
Phelps, Bruce Neal, Luda, Russell Springs, 866-2455 
Phelps, David F., Box 76, Science Hill, 423-3410 
Phelps, Mervil, 638 Carter Road, Owensboro, MU 3-0997, MU 

3-3671 
Phillips, Ray. Campton 

Pickett.- Robert S., Ill 2nd St.. Greensburg. 932-5421. 932-6231 
T'il.ov -li. Pniil lOS Bi;hor. Corbir. JjT-E 
Fik. Keboi": F :iiO K.;-!P>ood, Ru>s.;ll S:.iC-S060 
Powell, Geiald Lee, Humphrey Hall, Apt. No. 8. Lakewood 

Terrace, Morehead 
Prather, Edwin Eugene, Route No. 1, LaGrange, 279-6166, 241- 

8491 
Prather, Wilbur E., 1512 Berry Blvd., Louisville, EM 3-2908, 

EM 6-4930 ... 

Preece, John C, Box 365, Kermit, W. Va. 
Plewitt, Allan, South Cam.pbell, Lancaster. 792-2024, 648-2631 

:, L'jnthi'-ied jr: ta^wt Lltrveii) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1962 



The Flying Dutchman 

Colorful Herb Ockerman had his night at 
Boone County High School just before Hallo- 
ween when that section of northern Ken- 
tucky celebrated his decades of achievements 
with a dinner in his honor. As a teacher, 
coach and superintendent. Herb is one in a 
million. While at Mt. Washington he was 
principal, coach and helped Virgil Lewis with 
his janitorial duties when Virgil got tired. 
At Taylorsville this Kentuckian, possessed 
of a tremendous sense of humor, contracted 
to pay the Dutchman $7.50 to officiate a 
game in 1938 and chuckled heartily as he 
handed him a twenty-five pound bag of 
fresh hog sausage which Herb said was a 
bargain at thirty cents per pound. Kids love 
Coach, Principal, Superintendent, Janitor H. 
N. Ockerman; adults respect him and The 
Dutchman classes him with the other Ken- 
tucky trail blazers, Daniel Boone, Henry 
Hardin Cherry and Irvin S. Cobb. At his 
honor dinner, Herb Ockerman received a 
plaque proclaiming him one of "Nature's 
Noblemen" because of his leadership of 
youth, his reverance for God and his love of 
humanity. Herb is the first to be so honored 
— may his tribe increase! 

We first met fifty-one year old official 
Joe Schwartz twenty-five years ago at the 
Ashland Basketball Clinic. He is the first 
chap we have seen twenty consecutive years 
since 1943 at the same clinic. Now an energe- 
tic seventy one years of age, Joe is one of 
the most alert baseball umpires working for 
kids. Because of his lifetime of service to 
hundreds of youngsters he is the winner of 
the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor for the month 
of October. Joe has the right philosophy: 
"Live it up wholesomely." 

Attention coaches and athletic directors 
— next time you are in Hazard get Willie 
Dawahare to take you to meet Victor Tedesco 
and Joe Mellott. Athletes know them as 
friends. Their enthusiasm for wholesome 
sports will inspire you. Here is another pair 
of adults who know how to have fun living. 

Louisville's Claude Ricketts did a "Whale 
of a Job" when he packed the Mirror Room 
of the Kentucky Hotel with the 1962 record 
basketball clinic crowd of two hundred 
twenty five coaches and officials. 

Another clinic record formerly held by 
Sid Meade and Bill Brannum, fell when 
Beechmont's Jerry Kimmell attended five 
basketball clinics at Henderson, Beaver Dam, 
Hopkinsville, Bowling Green and Lexington. 

Some of the highlights of the 1962 clinic 




THE LIONHEART AWARD 

trip over scenic Kentucky were lunch with 
Central City's up and coming sports editor, 
Bobby Anderson, dinner with Bill Clark at 
Somerset, breakfast on top of the mountain 
with Paul Townes and "Buffalo Bill" Dawa- 
hare at Hazard, a session with Brad Mutch- 
ler, the perfect host, at Paducah, a night 
with the greatest mountaineer since Abner 
Yokum, my friend Pearl (Mr. Coach Pearl) 
Combs of Hindman, and a "turkish bath" 
with Herb Tye and Bill Nau at Pineville. 

Without Dick Looney, The Dutchman 
could never get his car out of Pikeville on 
that one way street. Dick has written a lot 
of history on the hardwood. "Mr. Intestinal 
Fortitude" is what he is called in "Them 
Thar Hills" — and brethren, he is all of that. 

Cliff Fagan puts on a dandy basketball 
clinic each October for the Federation in 
Chicago. Besides featuring Les Ansorge, 
Lyle Quinn and Milt Sprunger he had Her- 
man Keller of Indianapolis and Ohio's re- 
nowned official. Mack Schaffer, present. 
Mack is the official who starred in the last 
basketball film made by the National Federa- 
tion. "Handsome Mac" could qualify, for a 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1962 



Page Seven 



Hollywood movie. 

Assistant Commissioner Joe Billy Mans- 
field will have to shop for another Christmas 
present this year. The youthful administra- 
tor now has a granddaughter. 

Physically-handicapped youngstei's now 
receive a statuette as an award for over- 
coming handicaps as soon as a recommenda- 
tion is received by The Flying Dutchman. 
Send the story of your Game Guy to The 
Dutchman, Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association, Box 1173, Lexington, Kentucky. 
Send your nomination for the Cob Pipe 
Award to the same address. 

"Wouldn't life be lots more happy 
If we'd praise the good we see. 
For there's such a lot of goodness 
In the worst of you and me." 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of 
the University of Kentucky Department of Extension. 
The Code letters "e,j,s,c,a" refer to elementary, junior 
high, senior high, college and adult audiences who 
may enjoy the particular film listed. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the 
special subscription service plans, offered by the 
Bureau of Audio-Visual Material. 

Basketball 
ASHLAND VS. ST. XAVIER (1962 K.H.S. BASKET- 
BALL TOURNAMENT FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 3 

reels. Silent, $.75 

The Ashlar.d Tomcats gave a valiant performance 
in trying to capture their second consecutive cham- 
pionship but the Tigei's of St. Xavier were the win- 
ners in the final game by 62-58. The Tigers were led 
by Mike Silliman and the Tomcats by Larry Conley. 
BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, 

$1.50 

Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling in- 
cluding stance, grip, control, adjustment, before 
shooting, catching the ball, and other points. Pre- 
sents game shots, using special photographic tech- 
niques to illustrate principles. 
BASKETBALL BY RUPP, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Animated play diagrams, slow motion photogra- 
phy, arid action shots are combined in this new film 
prepared under the personal direction of Mr. Rupp 
especially for coaching use. Among the drills and 
plays covered in this film are: pivot man's slide into 
the basket; Play No. 6, the famous Kentucky Basket 
Maker; legal screening; penetrating zone defense; 
and the Kentucky fast break. 
BASKETBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

This is the film for 1958-59, produced by the Of- 
ficial Sports Film Service under the sa.-.ction of the 
National Federation. A fantastic dream sequence 
where impossible and nightmarish situations can and 
do arise is the co.'.tinuity thread us-?d throughout the 
film to depict: Accepted officiating proc dures — prob- 
lems created by double fouls and false double fouls — 
tricky situations connected with front and back court 
— jump ball infractions and procedures — little u.'.dsr- 
stood distinction batween player and team control — 
and a panorama of basic rule fu:.damentals. 
BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS — INDIVIDUAL 

TECHNIQUES, j-s-c-a, IVa reels, $2.50 

Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball 



coach, uses his team to demonstrate the fundamentals 
of basketball. Slow-motion photography is used to 
break the various court techniques down into easily 
grasped essentials. 

BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$2.50 (in state), $5.00 (out of state) 
This is the revised edition of the film "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 
BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 1 
reel, $1.50 

The basic strategy of offer.se play (fakes, rolls, 
cutting, screening, vai-ying pace) and defense play 
(player to player, basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, 
ard diagonal) is demonstrated and explained in this 
film. 

BASKETBALL TECHNIQUES FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 
1 reel, $1.50 

Basic movement skills (running, starting, stop- 
ping, turning) passing (finger control, movement 
with the pass, leading the receiver, choice of the right 
pass), catching (side pass, high pass), shooting (fing- 
er control, arm extension, wrist flip, choice of the 
right shot), dribbling, making, and pivoting are dem- 
onstrated and explained in this film. 
BASKETBALL FOR GIRLS: FUNDAMENTAL 
TECHNIQUES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel (11 min.), $1.50 
Past action, slow-motion photography, and skill- 
ful players combine to show fundamental techniques 
of ball handling, passing, and shooting. 
BASKETBALL FOR GIRLS: GAME'^ PLAY, j-s-c-a, 
1 reel (11 min.), $1.50 

Individual player techniques in offense and de- 
fense are demonstrated-pivoting, feinting, passing, 
screening, shooting, and handling rebounds. 
BETTER BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 
This film is produced by the Official Sports Film 
Service under the sanction of the National Federation 
of State High School Athletic Associations. It dem- 
onstrates current rules and good officiating procedure 
with colorful action by skilled players. 
CARR CREEK VS. HENDERSON (1956) K.H.S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e: j-s- 
c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 

The final game of the 1956 State Basketball 
Tournament is shown in this film. Carr Creek High 
School defeated Henderson by a narrow margin, 72 
to 68, to win the championship. 

CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALL — TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 

Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means 
best used under varying conditions. 
DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 
1 reel, $1.50 

Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuvar- 
ing him out of position and other basic skills are 
illustrated, using special photograyhy to dsmonstrate 
points. Rebounding, pivoting, and correlated arm 
action are taught also. 

DUNBAR VS. ASHLAND (1961) Finals, e-j-s-c-a, 
3 reels (33 min.), color, silent, $.75 
The Tomcats from Ashland High School won the 
final game of the tournament by defeating Dunbar 
High School of Lexington 69-50. The Ashland team 
won the tournament after eliminatim- William Grant, 
Seneca and Wheelwright to reach the final game. 
EASTERN VS. LAFAYETTE (1 57) K.H.S. BAS- 
KETBALL TOURNAME.^T FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 
3 reels, color, $.75 

The final game of the 1957 K.H.S. State Tourna- 
ment was played in Freedom Hall at the Kentucky 
Fair Grounds and Exposition Centsr before a record 
crowd of 18,000. The final score was 56-52 as the 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1962 



Lafayette Generals won the ci'own for the fourth time. 
MONTICELLO VS. PLACET (1960 K. H. S. A. A. 
STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
FINALS), e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, color, silent, $.75 
Flaget High School of Louisville defeated Monti- 
cello High School in the final game of the tournament 
to win the championship. The Braves came from be- 
hind in the last half to overtake the Trojans and win 
bv a score of 65-56. 

NORTH MARSHALL VS. DUPONT MANUAL (1959) 
K.H.S. BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, 
e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 

The Indians of North Marshall High School prov- 
ed too much for the Reds of duPont Manual in the 
final game, winning by a score of 64-63. All-State 
players, Doyle and Lampley, were best for the win- 
ners, while Mel-Mir and Siers led the Reds. 
OFFICIAL BASKETBALL, e-j-s-e-a, 4 reels (40 mia.), 
color, $.75 

Demonstrates the official rules interpretations 
covering screening, traveling, jump ball, front and 
back court, throw-ins, free throws, personal and 
technical fouls, rebounding, and unusual and often 
misunderstood play situations. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, j-s- 
c-a, 1 reel, silent, $1.25 

Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats 
(1949-50) demonstrate ten different plays in such a 
clear manner that it is easy to follow and learn each 
play. 

KUPP'S PARADE TO THE NATIONAL CHAMP- 
IONSHIP OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $3.50 
This film presents the high lights of all the 
games, both regular season and tournament games, 
which led up to the U of K's Wildcats winning the 
NCAA basketball crown. 

SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Concentrating on the set shot, this film pictures 
the action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and 
fingertip control. Special attention is given total body 
coordination, especially inward rotation of the hand 
and arm making the throw. 

ST. XAVIER VS. DAVIESS CO. (1958) K. H. S- 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s- 
c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

St. Xavier High School of Louisville won the 1958 
State Basketball Tournament by defeating Daviess 
County of Owensboro, 60-49, in the final game of the 
tournament at the University of Kentucky Coliseum. 



SPECTATOR SPORTSMANSHIP 

(Continued from Page One) 
disease that is spreading. 

The only way I can think of to correct 
it is to have schools insist the coaches act 
like gentlemen instead of hoodlums, and for 
the official to bounce the coach who becomes 
too great a problem. 

I have mentioned major league baseball 
before and you no doubt have seen baseball 
managers who went into dust-kicking, foot- 
stomping protests to um.pires and that in- 
ilL'd fan:. 

1 don't think mere is any douLt that man- 
agers sometimes do it for the sole purpose 
of inciting the fans with the hope the umpire 
can be intimidated. 

Perhaps the idea of intimidation also goes 
'.hi'jugli the mind 'ji iht lantiiig 'cyach= If 



so, that falls far short of good sportsmanship. 

Now the rules makers have a part and 
this applies particularly to basketball and 
football. I am convinced that part of bad 
spectator sportsmanship is due to the fact 
the average fan doesn't know the rules. 

They have changed the rules so often 
in basketball and football in the last two de- 
cades or so that I'm surprised even the play- 
ers, officials and coaches keep up with them. 

I am not going to put much blame on the 
players except for pro basketball and hockey. 
In those two sports I do think the players 
often get into the act, perhaps not wholly to 
incite the fans, but their actions serve that 
purpose. 

Officials claim there is a trend for more 
deliberate viciousness among players. Quite 
frankly, I would hesitate to express an opin- 
ion on that. Certainly basketball is rougher 
than it once was but part of that can be 
blamed on the rules whereby the action is 
jammed in one small section of the floor. It 
can't help but be rougher. 

In football I suspect there may be a 
trend to get by with as much as you can as 
long as you don't get caught but I believe 
that is the exception rather than the rule. 
When it occurs someone besides me will have 
to fix the blame — it could rest on the player 
or on a coach who permits it. 

Now I come to my own profession. 

In my opinion, there are too many cheer- 
leader sports writers. They become so obses- 
sed with the team they are covering that 
they become a combination sports writer, 
player, coach, official and fan. I haven't seen 
the sports writer who can fill all those shoes. 

That is the type of sports writer whose 
team never is defeated. It may lose but it 
wasn't defeated. The other team was lucky, 
the officiating was bad, the home team was 
hurt by injuries or the playing floor or field 
in an opposing city was bad. 

That is not objective reporting. 

I certainly don't mean a sports writer 
should ignore obvious bad officiating, 
obvious misbehavior by a coach or obvious 
lucky breaks but don't blame every defeat on 
such things. 

Honestly, sometimes your team just gets 
whijiped, 

I am going to defend my own profession 
by sayin? I believe such sports writers are 
in the minority but you can make a safe bet 
that if I were the managing editor or sports 
editor of a newspaper for which such things 
were being written, I'd put a mighty quick 
jtcp t'j :t. 1 b>jlieit :v. vnitiiig IIil jtuiy ol" 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1962 



Page Nine 



the game, explaining what happened but not 
second guessing the coach, the players and 
the officials. 

A second guesser never lost a game in 
his life. 

I can't think of anything that destroys 
my enjoyment of a game either as spectator 
or a sports writer more than uproars among 
fans and the things I believe have caused it. 

No one is going to end all bad spectator 
conduct but certainly the school officials, 
the coaches, the officials, the players, the 
rules makers and the sports writers can help 
reduce it — if they themselves will behave. 



SPORTS FOR YOUNGSTERS? IS FOOT- 
BALL SAFER? YES, SAY TWO EX- 
PERIENCED PHYSICIANS 

MOUNT VERNON, N. Y. — Should a 
boy below the age of 12 be allowed to parti- 
cipate in organized athletics? Is football 
more dangerous today than it was 30 years 
ago? 

The answer to the first question is yes 
and the second no, according to two physi- 
cians who devote a major portion of their 
professional lives to athletic medicine, Dr. 
Allan J. Ryan, Chairman of the A.M.A.'s 
committee on the medical aspects of sports, 
and Dr. Francis J. Sweeny, physician for 
the New York Giants football team. 

Answering the "antis' on the controver- 
sial question of whether youngsters should 
play competitive sports, Dr. Ryan says they 
should in an editorial in the current issue of 
the newsletter "Medicine in Sports," publish- 
ed by Rysten Company, Mount Vernon, N.Y. 
But only if — and he emphasizes the if — 
"They are being protected from injury by 
medical examinations before participation, 
use of proper protective equipment, good of- 
ficating and coaching, and the presence of 
physicians ..." at the games. 

Replying to two main points of criticism, 
he says there is no medical evidence of long- 
range danger from "micro-trauma" — minute 
injuries — to still developing bones, and that 
certainly competitive sports should not be 
allowed to interfere with regular school aca- 
demic and physical education programs de- 
signed to develop all the potentialities of all 
children. 

But all children will plaj- baseball, foot- 
b.ill and other games after school, and if 
ihey do so on refuse-lilteied vacant lots, 
without proper equipment and supervision, 
"injuries will result. These injuries are sel- 
dom reported as sports injuries but appear 
as neighborhood accidents in the doctor's 
cffice or enieigsxicy >ccm='' 



Dr. Ryan notes that there have been 
abuses of organized athletic programs for 
youngsters, including over-emphasis on win- 
ning, all-star games, too much parent inter- 
ference, etc., which have led to demands that 
whole programs be banned. He suggests, in- 
stead, that "if those who are so vocal in their 
opposition would take the trouble to join 
these organizations as volunteers and work 
from within to correct these abuses, more 
would be accomplished." 

On the other side of the athletic coin, 
what of the professional football player who 
is expected to risk his neck for pay? Is his 
calling more dangerous? 

No, says Dr. Sweeny, who has been min- 
istering to the football Giants for 30 years: 
"Athletic medicine isn't what it used to be, 
and neither is the game. "They're both bet- 
ter." 

Better rules and equipment have reduced 
the incidence of serious injuries. And there 
are drugs, for example, a recently developed 
enzyme called Buclamase, that permit us 
to reduce sprained ankles and knees in a 
matter of days instead of the weeks that it 
used to take. Dr. Sweeny explains. 

There was a time, three decades ago, 
when the cry, "Is there a doctor in the 
house?" would go up if a player was knocked 
out on the field. And it more often than not 
was answered by someone who just wanted 
to get down on field and "didn't know any 
more about medicine than a taxi driver." ac- 
cording to Dr. Sweeny. 

You rarely see a skull fracture, shoulder 
separation or broken clavicle because of the 
plastic helmets and improved shoulder pads, 
Dr. Sweeny says in "Medicine in Sports." 

"In one game, 15 years ago, three Giants 
suffered spinal fractures, caused by tacklers 
crashing down on the back of a runner." This 
is almost never seen today because of the rule 
that now prevents a player from crawling 
with the ball. 

Minor injuries, to the ankle and knee, 
for example, are less frequent because of 
better protection and treatment. A Giant 
who sprains his ankle during play may suffer 
a $50 fine in addition to his injury if it's 
found that he was violating the iron-bound 
rule that every player must have his ankles 
professionally taped before entering the 
fiekl 

The use of the so-called non-proteolytic 
enzyme, Buclamase, which relieves pain and 
inflammation, has proven of considerable 
value "in reducing swelling, and the accumu- 
lation of fluid in joint injuries, bruises and 
Charley hi;ii!eS;" Dr. Sweeny explain^; 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1962 



Buclamase tablets, which are taken orally 
and allowed to dissolve against the cheek 
where they are absorbed, are given on the 
field, sometimes to as many as four or five 
players in a single game, as soon as an in- 
jury that may cause swelling occurs. Treat- 
ment is continued for four or five days. 

"The players used to laugh when I told 
them a pill held in their mouths would bring 
down a swollen ankle or knee. They don't any 
more." Says Dr. Sweeny. 

Perhaps the best indication of the safety 
of the game in that the players used to call 
him "Old Stitch" because of the number of 
cuts and bruises he had to sew up. They 
don't use that sobriquet any longer, not be- 
cause he can't take care of their wounds with 
his usual artistry, but because there just 
aren't that many wounds. 



AS WE SEE ATHLETIC COMPETITION 

(Continued from Inside Cover) 

B. Provide training for leadership and follower- 
ship. Students learn the art of recognizing commend- 
able leadership and following those capable of setting 
the pace. 

C. Develop courage ... no wishbone ever took 
the place of a backbone in interscholastic sports. 

D. Provide opportunities for companionship. 

1. Opportunities in athletics are unequalled for 
establishing an esprit de corps and a camaraderie. 

2. Lifelong frier.dships are formed here. 

VI. Athletes learn that there is a division of 
responsibility. 

A. Some receive the glory. 
B. Some do the "dirty work." 

VII. One of the greatest lessons learned by par- 
ticipants in the athletic program is that it requires 
preparation and sacrifice. We have come to believe 
that only a moron thinks it's funny to break train- 
ing rules and only another moron would laugh with 
him for doing so. The disciplir.iary values of the in- 
terscholastic program are difficult to evaluate but 
the benefits are tremendous. 

VIII. One of the great lessons learned by par- 
ticipants is that there are rules to follow. There is 
no "slick" way of violating and beating the rules, 
either of an athletic game or of human behavior in 
the game of life. 

IX. A you;.g boy enters the program of athletics 
and he graduates near the border of manhood. It is 
interesting to watch the growth. 

X. There is no greater opportunity to train the 
emotions while at the si me time allowing them to be 
expressed than in i.'.terscholastic sports. In this pro- 
gram, anger, greed, happiness, hate, and all other 
emotional tracts constantly beset each player. In 
athletics boys and coaches run the gamut of ex- 
pressions from te/sion to relaxation, from sori-ow to 
gladness, from silence to exultation, and from tears 
to laughter. Here, under proper direction, players 
learn to control tempers, to observe rules and, in 
general, direct emotions in accepted channels of be- 
havior. In the average classroom there is little op- 
portunity for a person to train his emotions since 
there is seldom a chance to express them. There are 
very few shouts of joy or tears of happiness in a 
scientific laboratory or an English classroom. Most 



of the tears there are tears of frustration. 

Finally, participation in interschoalstic sports 
contributes immeasurably to the worthy use of leisure 
time. A survey presented in the May 1959 issue of 
the Physical Educator published by the Phi Epsilon 
Kappa fraternity indicates the participation of for- 
mer athletes after graduation to be roughly three 
times that of the ron-active student. During an ag? 
when we are seriously concerned with education for 
leisure, this is a most important factor. Such sports 
as smimming, tennis, golf, baseball, softball (accord- 
ing to the survey) figured strongly in the leisure 
time activities of ex-athletes. 

Some Shortcomings: 

I. The program of athletics represents 10 per 
cent of the student population. What is happening 
to the other 90 percent? Do they serve only as spec- 
tators? Does the program of athletics siphon off all 
the resources, thus jeopardizing the program for 
many? Is there a program of physical education and 
intramurals for the oft-forgotten 90 percent? 

II. The high school athletic program is often too 
limited in scope. A program of team sports alone, 
such as basketball and football, without regard for 
those more valuable as carryover activities, repre- 
sents a vei-y limited approach. 

III. Unfortunately, we still have to question the 
quality of some teaching that takes place in athletics 
and the philosophy espoused by some coaches. True, 
there is a preponderance of educators amor.ig coaches. 
Unfortunately, however, there are still those who 
have mottoes such as this in their dressing room, 
conspicuously displayei, "Winning isn't everything; 
it is the only thing." Surely one would question the 
motives of a coach who supported this philosophy. 
May I read a letter to a coach from a parent. This 
I believe, expresses quite effectively those qualities 
which should be sought by every coach. State Athletic 
Director Rhea H. Williams printed the letter in his 
Texas Interscolastic Leaguer. 

A LETTER TO COACH 
"Dear Coach: 

"As a parent. Coach, I am eternally thankful 
that my boy had the opportunity to play under your 
supervision and leadership. Each day during the foot- 
ball season my boy learned through example those 
fine moral and ethical character traits which we all 
want our boys to know and to follow. I recall the 
night Bill told me how he nearly lost his temper in a 
scrimmage but thought just in time that ' Coach" 
never loses his temper, and neither will I. Thanks, 
Coach, for setting an example in proper conduct on 
a.nd off the field. Bill tells me that Coach can be firm 
without being loud, mean and boisterous, that Coach 
knows when to sympathize, when to pat you on the 
shoulder, and how to correct you. These are leader- 
ship traits I want my son to acquire and he can best 
learn these on the field of competition under proper 
leadership. 

"For three months. Coach, my boy has really 
been under your complete control. He has adjusted 
his life to your suggested plan. Meals, hours of sleep, 
social activity, etc., have all been adjusted to your 
schedule and through these ha has learned voluntary 
obedience to iTiles; in his scrimmage and games he 
has further learned obedience to constituted author- 
ity. How much this obedience to rules and authority 
is needed in today's society! I believe Bill has learn- 
ed this lesson. Coach. Bill imitates your every action, 
you are his ideal. How proud I am that our personal 
life and conduct are o.i such a high level; my boy 
dresses better, speaks better English, and behaves 
better because Coach sets the example. I wonder if 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1962 



Page Eleven 



all coaches realize how important a place they have 
in the school and community and how many boys are 
imitating them. 

"Especially, Coach, I want to thank you for in- 
sisting that athletes study diligently, ard stressing 
constantly the fact that scholastic work is so im- 
portant. Bill told me that you had impressed on all 
of the team that football players are superior intellec- 
tually to the average student and that thev should 
make good grades because they have the ability to do 
so. This teaches the boys rot to try ard "ride by" 
b-^cause they are athletes. I had told Bill several times 
that Dr. Terman, in his studies on gifted children, 
had found that children with superior physiques have 
superior mental abilities. Hearing this sam^ principle 
from his coach, however, made an impression which is 
lasting. 

"Your emphasis on teamwork, coopsration, fair 
play, sportsmanship, honestv, integrity, obedience to 
authority, control of emotions, proper health habits, 
and proper conduct has earned for you a place of hon- 
or in the hearts of all the parents, the students, the 
faculty, and the community. 

"The impact of your leadership is just as obvious 
in the community as in the school. Your active par- 
ticipation in civics, church and youth organizations 
proves that you are really concerned about all youth, 
and that you want to make our town a better place 
for everyone to live in. 

'We appreciate you and want you to krow that 
this is a better community because you chose the 
profession of coaching and the leadership of youth. 
Your friend. 
Bill's Dad" 

IV. How much interference is there in the aca- 
demic program through interseholastic sports? In this 
area we have much work to do and part of the re- 
sponsibility rests on your shoulders. How much time 
do students lose? Do you support week night games? 
There has been much consideration given to pro- 
hibiti.'g all weekday activities. 

V. The cost of the program: 

Where do the funds come from: Does it mean 
some first grade teacher does not have the barest 
essentials in terms of balls and play equipment? What 
about the costs involved in scouting a.od travel: Is 
it essential that we scout opponents two or three 
times each year and photograph their every move? 

VI. Complete accord between administrators and 
statewide organizations regulating the program is 
paramount. This is not always the case. This organi- 
zation has done much to help here and there is still 
much to be done. 

_ VII. Lay attitudes is another area where we need 
assistance aad here is where the state associations 
can help. 

In summary, the following points are given for 
your consideration: 

1. Athletics is not an "extra" but a real part of 
the curriculum . 

2. There should be no overemphasis but proper 
emphasis on the interseholastic program. 

3. The athletic program should not be the tail 
wagging the dog; neither should it be only the tail 
following the dog. 

4. Finally, as an integral part of the educational 
program, provisions must be made for adequately 
staffing and financing the program of athletics in 
the secondary sehogls. 



BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(Continued from Page Five) 

Price. Charles A., .3445 13th St.. Ashland, 325-3854. 324-3177 
Randolph, Don M., 6310 Sheila Road, Louisville, 969-6359, 969- 

6145 
Rawlings. Charles, Route No. 3, Elizabethtown. RO 5-2529, RO 

5-5237 
Redman, Malvern G., Route No. 3. Mt. Vernon. Ind., SU 3-2581 
Richardson, Charles E., Waco, 369-5992, 369-5595 
Richardson, Ralph D., Route No. 1, Font Hill 

Rickman, Murrel, Box 265, College Station. Murray, PL 3-4999 
Reliford, Paul G., 2912 Prichard St., Ashland, 325-2109 
Robertson. William R,, 121 Main St,, Springfield, 336-7154, 

336-9963 
Robinson, George W., Beta House, Centre College, Danville 

236-5635 
Rodgers, Tom H.. 238 Waddill, Madisonville, TA 1-5092, TA 

1-6520 
Ross, Harold L., Route No. 2, Elkton, 265-2493, 265-2407 
Royse, Pete. 220 Richmond Ave., Nicholasville, 885-4975, 885 

4975 
Rothfuss. Richard, 37 Gregory Lane. Ft. Thomas, HI 1-9190 
Russman, Godfrey F.. 1041 Goss Ave,, Louisville 
Rutledge, Marvin L.. 112 Butler, Frankfort, 227-7293, 227-661! 
Sallee, Alan, Ath. Dept. Villanova University. Villanova, Pa. 
Schmidt, Frank L., 1309 Hull St., Louisville, JU 4-6421 
Scott. Donald, Red Bird Mission, Beverly 
Secrest, Eldon Wesley, 504 Boyd St,. Russell, 836-5322 
Selvy, Curt, 108 17th St,, Corbin, 2422, 1333 
Sexton, Steven. C„ Box 354, Whitesburg, 633-2339 (Bus,) 
Sexton William L., 324 4th Ave., Dayton, 431-5941, MA 1-4321 

ext 40 
Shephard, James Baker, Box 267 Livermore, 278-2682 
Shuck Thomas G., 960 Stonewall. Lexington, 7-14 12, 2-9o96 
Sillimkn William Gerald, 3302 Radiance Road, Louisville, 451- 

9512', EM 6-0341 
Simoson Fred C, 314 N, Maysville, Mt, Sterling 
S mpson' Paul D. 909 East Main St„ Lexington, 3-2266 (Bus,, 
siJTcher, ■ Kenneth W., Box 68, Simpsonville, PA 2-5231, PA 

Small" William W., 1846 Mary Catherine Drive, Louisville 16, 

EM 8-8365. JU 4-6308 
Smallwood, Kenneth, Box 317. Brooksville 
Smith, David W., 8107 Rory Way, Louisville. 969-0060, OL 

Smithson. Richard A., 1945 Nashville Road. Bowling Green, 

VI 3-4844, VI 2-1695 
Spoonamore Jim, 111 Pettus Court, Stanford, 365-2348, Lex- 
ington. I.B.M. ext. 3046 
Stauffer, Frank, South Main, Lawrenceburg, 839-6350 
Stegall, Karl K., Box 555, Louisville 5, 896-9371 ME 7-1477 
Stoess, Henry L.. Kavanaugh Road. Route No. 1, Box 394, 

Crestwood, CH 1-4196, JU 4-4658 
Stone, Doyle C„ 109 Moundale, Winchester, 744-2198, 744-4618 
Stroud, Donnie, 2600 Frederica, Owensboro, MU 3-5403 
Tavlor Ed, 435 North 41st St., Louisville, SP 2-0126, 58i-b52b 
Tompkins, Chester B., Slaughters, 884-3221, 884-3381 
Tegethoff, Kenneth, Route No, 1, Geneva VA 7-5891 
Trepus, Willard, Box 288, Route No. 1, Jackson, 666-5422, bbb- 

Urlage, Richard, 822 Highland Ave., Ft. Thomas, 441-5613, 471- 

Van Winkle, Billy, 2600 E. Cloverdale, Owensboro. MU 3-4617, 

Varble, William, 1706 Cypress St,, Louisville, SP 5-6712, SP 

2-3621 
Varney, Luke, Jr., Clay St., Louisa, ME 8-4798 
Veneklase, Kenneth, 3424 Hycliffe, St, Matthews 
Visscher, Robert W., 5406-C Paquette St,, Fort Kn 

4-2947 
Walters, Bob, Box 921, PikeviUe, GE 7-6237 
Walters, Darwin, 449 Cumberland Ave., Pmeville, ED 7-2654 
Warren Kenneth A,, 45 Meadowview, Louisville, GL 4-5001, 

me' 4-1551 ext. 268 
Waterson, Allan F., c/o Asbury Seminary, Wilmore 
Weathers, Charles, Jr. 3620 Grand, Louisville, SP 6-6026, JU 

4-1361 ext. 473 
Webb, Lonard. Brownsville 
Weiner, Richard Allen, 8 Poplar Ridge, Alexandria, MY 7-5083, 

VA 1-4280 ext. 263 
West, Jimmy, Box 248, Morgantown, LA 6-3061 
Weyer, James G„ 224 East 12th St., Covington, 431-1096. 251- 

6400 
Whaley, William C, Route No. 1. Maysville. 664-3942, 564-3461 
Wheeler. Donald Wayne, Route No. 2, Bowling Green, 842-7807, 

843-3031 
Whitehead, J. R., 906 West 3rd St., Beaver Dam, 274-4466, 274- 

4337 
Whittemore, Paul F., P. O. Bldg., Prestonsburg, 6-3334, TU 

6-2680 
Wiggingson, Al, Sr.. 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville 11, SP 6-7881 
Wiler, James W„ Blaine, OL 2-3541 
Wilham, Earl, Marimon Ave.. Harrodsburg, 734-3335 
Williams, Benny. Route No. 3. Philpot, Owensboro PA 9-4566 
Williams, Bobby, 220 Stratford Ave., Richmond, 623-3894, 623- 

4969 
Williams, Charles E., 312 Kentucky Ave., Paducah, 444-7332 

(Bus.) 
Williams, Donald, Broadway, Irvine, 723-2615 (Bus.) 



4-6107, 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1962 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Drive Lexington, Ky, 

School Representative 

FRED "Rock" REECE 

Versailles, Ky. 

Phone 873-3623 



Distributors of: 



Spanjian 

Southern 

Nocona 

Wilson 

Spalding 

Rawlings 

Voit 

Adidas Track Shoes, State of Ky. 

Dehen & New Era Sweaters 



Bike 

Cramer 

Stim-0-Stam Tablets 

Wigwam Socks 

Butwin Jackets 

Adirondack Bats 

Trophies 

E. R. Moore Gym Suits 

Riddell Helmets & Shoes 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



Gene Stokley 



7-3977 



Dick Wallace 



2428 Adams. Ashland, 325-2733, 324-7910 

Hall, Morehead, Paintsville 



mpbellsville, 465-8392 
;innati 24, Ohio, 522- 



6-7449. 2-0410 



Williams. Jam 

4337 
Williams, Paul W., North 

789-4503 
Williams. Roger. 404 Bond St.. Richmond. 623-3126 
Williams. Tom M.. Box 288A Johnson Acres, Bardstown. 

Springfield 336-3786 (Bus.) 
Williams, Willie H., 519C Aspendale D 

2-1654, 2-3212 
Wilson, Fred L., Box 34, Trenton. Ohio. YV 8-6926. GA 3-0731 
Wilson. H. G.. 205 N. Maple. Somerset. 679-1290. 679-1544 
Wilson. S. O.. Jr.. 801 Meadow Lane. Murray. PL 3-5625 
Winchester. Roy L.. 7405 Vaughn Mill Road. Louisville, CL 

9-5202, New Castle 346-8421 
Winders. Floyd C. 4235 Forest Ave.. Paducah 
Wingfield. Felix G., 1132 E. Parkway, Louisville. ME 6-2286, 

SP 2-2556 
Winfrey, Shelby, 315 Sharon Drive, Ci 
Wirtz, Howard, 6510 Hamilton Ave.. Gin 

1818. 751-1325 
Wise. Billy V.. 2112 St. Teresa. Lexingto 
Wise, Jack. 408 Fountain. Georgetown, 2052, 120 
Withrow. Roy D., 310 Cleveland, Glasgow, 651-2497. GA 7-2611 
Wolford. Hoover. Phelps. GL 6-3477 
Wood. Ellsworth, Brooksville 
Wood, James W.. 1133 Avondale Road, Owensboro. MU 4-1789, 

MU 3-2401 
Wood, Kenneth C. 547 Robin Ave.. Fraknfort, 3-0244, 3-6870 
Woods, Carl, Four Mile, ED 7-2006 
Woods, Gene, Route No. 2, Kirksey, HU 9-2595, Calvert City 

EX 5-4186 
Woodward, Billy, 2430 Lewis St.. Owensboro. MU 3-9710. MU 

4-2301 
Woodward. Danny H.. P. O. Box 253, Nortonville, BR 6-3200, 

TA 1-6463 
Woodward, Roy, 1115 Olive St.. Murray. PL 3-4385 
Wright, Ben H.. 211 North Claggett Drive. Leitchfield. 259- 

3868. 259-3101 
Wright. Billy J., Salt Lick. OR 4-3927 
Wright. H. W.. Jr.. 714 Cedar Grove Court, Louisville, SP 

4-5173. JU 7-1161 ext. 433 
Wright. James Lloyd. Dogwood St., Frankfort 
Wrigley. Joseph H.. 12303 Davidson Drive, Middletown, CH 

5-5071 
Wurtz, Emil, 18 E-4th St.. Cincinnati. Ohio, 471-0626. 381-1232 
Yancey. William Thomas, 3618 Waggoner, Evansville 16, Indi- 
ana. GR 7-4336. HA 4-6575 
Yanoff, Jay Myron, 3702 Stanton Blvd., Louisville, GL 8-7574 



Yarbrough, Curtis. Central City. 1534 

Yates. Howard. Oil Springs. 297-3285 

Yates. Virgil. Route No. 1. Wingo, 376-2432. 376-3271 

Yeary. Bill. 166 Lowry Lane. Lexington. 7-1578. 6-3181 

Yelton. Gene B.. Brooksville, 735-6430 

Zachem. Vincent. 115 West Wind Trail, Bardstwon, FI 8-8985 

FI 8-8147 
South, Lexington, Zachery Bobby Gene, 1925 Taffeta Drive. Valley Station. WF 

7-1747 

LIST OF CORRECTIONS 
1962 FOOTBALL RULES PUBLICATIONS 

CASE BOOK: 

1. Page 16, No. 104B: In the play B4 charges a- 
cross A's rather than B's line. Ruling is correct. 

2. Page 20, No. 122: If A gained 7 yards as stated 
ill the play, the ruling for item (b) penalty declined 
would be A's ball, 1st and 10 on its 43 because A 
would have reached the line-to-gain. 

3. Page 40, No. 215B: Delete the words "behind the 
line" in the third line of the play. Ruling is correct. 

4. The last sentence is true if A has advanced be- 
yond the line-to-gain before he threw the illegal pass, 
the penalty for which was declined. 

MEETING FOLDER: 

1. l-age 3, Key lo Questions on Page 1: Ruling for 
22 should include penalizing 15 yards as well as dis- 
qualifying the player. 

2. Page 6, Rule 8: Clause "or is beyond it because 
of a charge which drives an opponent back from the 
neutral zone" should be deleted. 

3. Page 7, In Action Period 3: Delete, in second 
sentence, the words "As in Action Period 2, either a 
loose ball play or." Also, delete word "ball" at end 
of line two. 

4. Page 12, Forward Pass Interference: Replace 
last two words of statement 1 with "leaves passer's 
hands." 



Student Accident Protection 
Athletic Coverages 

LEGAL LIABILITY INSURANCE FOR 

YOUTH SPORTS LEAGUES 

HOSPITALIZATION AND MAJOR 

MEDICAL COVERAGES 

ACCIDENT HEALTH INSURANCE 

LIFE INSURANCE 

YOUTH GROUP COVERAGES 

Prompt and Efficient Service 

Local Agent's Name 

On Request. 



^U& Kiax^dteH, QamfiaHif> 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 
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Hiqh School Athlete 



Class AAA State Champion Si Xavier 




9. 



gsrse 32 39^'«^^4 -26^ ^2 87J OQ 82 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. P. Patterson, Mgr. J. Leibert, L. Raible, J. McDaniel, R. 
Schaftlein, D. Koch, R. Meihaus, R. Brown, R. Bailey, P. Brown, C. Ernst, D. Vish, H. Hagen, 
Mgr. B. Humpkey, Mgr. T. Weigel. Second Row: D. Ridge, B. Paulus, S. Mossholder, B. Vana- 
man, L. Wolf, J. Riley, M. Heichelbuch, J. Mitchell, J. Rogers, R. Lyons, Third Row: J. Glaser, 
M. Harpring, E. Schardein, F. Meyer, A. Bissmeyer, C. Davis, D. Day, T. Prechtel, J. Baker, 
S. Bocko. Fourth Row: P. Meyer, R. Esterlee, H. Bischoff, D. Obst, R. GreenweU, S. Bisig, 
C. Reader, D. Amett, T. Thompson, C. Koch. Fifth Row: B. Edwards, P. Mueller, R. Kaelin, J. 
Wheatley, R. Pike, G. Wachtel, M. Moorman, W. Gahm, R. Quick, F. Woerner, B. Smith. 



St. Xavier 23— Elder (Ohio) 29 

St. Xavier 40— Fr. Ryan (Tenn.) 

St. Xavier 21— Manual 

St. Xavier 13— Trinity 

St. Xavier 19— Male 12 



St. Xavier 7— DeSales 

St. Xavier 42— Central 13 

St. Xavier 32 — ^Providence (Ind.) 

St. Xavier 29— Flaget 

St. Xavier 7— Valley 6 



OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

DECEMBER - 1862 




SENECA — REGION II. DISTRICT 2. CLASS AAA CHAMPION 






a5>^:3B' 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Larry Nnttall, Manrin O'Coon, Rusty Waddell. Harrell Tagiie, Charlie Schott. 
Done Clifton, Roger Bailey, David Hiland, George Bui itt. Second Row : Leslie Schott, Andy Sawyer. George 
Dickson. Reginald Ford. Mike Stephenson. Norman REderer, Reginald Unseld. Jim Dent. Jeff Holbrook. Ricky 
Stoll, Leon Wahca. Third Row: Jim Swart. Charlie Mctzger, Robert Jacobs. Miltin. Miller. Bill Geoghagen, Tom 
McGinnis, Ed Baldridge, Don Baldridge, Jim Gray, Wayne Draggoo, Bob Wester. Don Waddell. 



The 1962 Cross Country 

The St. Xavier Hig'h School of Louisville, paced 
by Blaine Vetter, won the tenth official K. H. S. A. A. 
Cross Country Rim, which was held in Lexington on 
November 10. The team score was 54 with the score 
of second place Louisville Trinity being 104. Vetter's 
time was 10:33. Joe Warren of Taylor County was 
second with the time of 10:40, and Don Dusch of 
Louisville Flaget was third with 10:41. 

Scores of the first ten teams in the state run 
were as follows: St. Xavier, 54; Trinity, 104; Southern, 
173; Madison Central, 194; Butler, 208; Flaget, 211; 
Mayfield and Lexington Catholic, 227; Taylor County, 
251, Meade Memorial, 300. 

The State Cross Country Run was held on the 
Picadome Golf Course, and was managed by Press 
Whelan, Assistant Track Coach at the University of 
Kentucky. Mr. Whelan was assisted by local officials 
and by members of the U. K. Varsity and Freshman 
ti-ack teams. 

Eight regional runs had been held for the purpose 
of qualifying teams and individuals for the state 
event. These runs wei-e held at Paducah, Bowling 
Green, Clarkson, Bardstown, Louisville, Bellevue, Lex- 
ington, and Paintsville. In addition to the teams, 
several individual runners qualified as entrants for 
the state affair. 

The ordea- in which the first fifty runners finished 
is given below, including the times of the first twenty- 
five. 

1-Blaine Vetter, St. Xavier (10:33); 2-Joe Warren, 
Taylor Co. (10:40); 3-Dan Dusch, Flaget (10:41); 4- 
Joe Brooks, Southern (10:42), 5-Richard Kelty, Trin- 
ity (10:43); 6-Pat Ehrlw, Atherton (10:44); 7-Jim 
Yost, Fort Campbell (10:45); 8-Jim Schmidt, Trinity 
(10:45.1); 9- Chuck Roberts, St. Xavier (10:46); 10- 
Glen Mai-shall, Madison Central (10:47); 11-BUl Eigel, 
St. Xavier (10:48); 12-Don Embry, Butler (10.49); 
13-Ron Foree, Eastern (10:50); 14-Ron Dunson, Madi- 
son Central (10:51); 15-Tim Harty, Lexingiton Cath- 
olic (10:52); 16-Rocky Graf, St. Xavier (10:53); 17- 
Mike Kelly, St. Xavier (10:56); 18-Garry MiUer, 
Somerset (10:59); 19-Steve Mays, Lajfayette (11:00); 
20-Art Green, Newport Catholic (11:01); 21-Mike 
ConJon, St. Xavier (11:02); 22-Jack Jackson, Trinity 
(11:03); 23-Kenny Pack, Flat Gap (11.04); 24-John 
Blake, Trinity (11:09); 25-John Fritts, Somerset 
(11:10); 26-Garry Sublett, Southern; 27-Jesse Ward, 
Madison Central; 28-Terry Gallagher, Lexington 



The St. Xavier Team 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Capt. Blaine Vetter, Bill Eigel, 
Chuck Roberts. Second Row: Ron Singler. Mike Kelly, Bob 
Graf, Mike Conlon. Third Row: Coach Jerry Denny, Ass*t. 
Coach Joe Heitzman. 

Catholic; 29-John Winslow, Mayfield; 30-Phdl Pop, 
Newport Catholic; 31-H. Colvin, Meade Memorial; 
32-Mike Wolf, Gov. Holmes; 33-Phil Fister, Lexing- 
ton Catholic; 34-J. Blevens, Meade Memorial; 35- 
Skipper Hutton, College; 36-Cecil Goodwin, Southern; 
37-Charles Thompson, Greensburg; SS-Larry Jones, 
Mayfield; 39-Robert Adams, Mayfield; 40-Ron Sing- 
ler, St. Xavier; 41-Bennie Bennett, East Hardin; 42- 
Larry Hart, Southern; 43-Bob Ulrich, Flaget; 44-Joe 
Lee, Flaget; 45-Rusty Herbig, Trinity; 46-Larry 
Bright, Butler; 47-Lewis White, East Hardin; 48-Gene 
Kelty, Trinity; 49-James Cosby, Butler; 50-Ken Reehl, 
Butler. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXV— NO. 5 



DECEMBER, 1962 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions-Installment 1 



EDITOR'S NOTE: These rulings do not set aside nor 
modify any nile. Tliey are interpretations of some of the 
early season situations which have been presented. 

1. Play: Following a double foul, the ball 
is being taken to the center circle when Bl 
flagrantly pushes Al. 

Ruling: The 3rd foul makes this a false 
double foul, one element of which is a double 
foul. No free throws for the double foul. 
Two free throws are awarded team A for 
the flagrant technical foul by Bl and Bl is 
disqualified. Center jump between any two 
opponents follows the 2nd free throw. 

2. Play: How much time does a player 
have to request a position between two op- 
ponents around the restraining circle during 
a jump ball? 

Ruling: In administering a jump ball, 
the official should observe the position of 
all players around the restraining circle and, 
when he is satisfied the players have taken 
their positions, he will proceed with the 
toss. Once the official is ready to make the 
toss, the ball is about to change status and no 
request for a position between adjacent 
teammates will be honored. 

3. Play: With three or four seconds re- 
maining to be played, Al, during a jump 
ball, taps the ball directly out of bounds. 

Ruling: Clock should be started when 
the ball is legally tapped. Ball is awarded 
to B for a throw-in. Unless there is un- 
usual delay in making the ball available for 
the throw-in by B because the ball went 
under the bleachers or into the stands, the 
clock sihiould not be stopped. 

4. Play: The official indicates that the 
offended player is awarded two free throws. 
This is not a bonus situation. Al misses his 
first attempt and the official inadvertently 
permits the ball to continue in play. 

Ruling: The error is considered to have 
been made while the clock is running, since 
the official did not declare the ball dead 
following the first free throw attempt by 
Al. Therefore, if tihe error is recognized be- 
for the ball becomes alive the second time 
following the error, it should be corrected. 

5. Play: Al is in the act of trying for 
field goal. He is fouled simultaneously by 
Bl, B2 and B3 and: (a) the try is successful: 



or (b) the try is unsuccessful. 

Ruling: This is a multiple foul. In both 
(a) and (b) Al is awarded three free throws, 
one for each personal foul. 

6. Play: At the completion of his dribble 
Al jumps into the air for a try. (a) Before; 
or (b) after the ball leaves his hand, Al 
charges Bl. The try is successful. 

Ruling: In (a), the goal does not count 
and Al has committed a common foul while 
he is in control. In (b), the goal counts and 
Al is charged with a foul which is penalized 
with a free throw which may involve a bonus. 
The goal can count only if the ball has left 
the hands of Al before the foul occurred. 
The provisions of 6-7 Exception (2) apply 
only when the foul is made by an opponent of 
the player making the try. 

7. Play: After a three-second violation 
by A, Bl is awarded the ball out of bounds 
behind the end line. Bl passes the ball 
parallel to the end line to B2, who is also out 
of bounds behind it. Witihin five seconds, B2 
throws in to B3^ who is on the court. Bl 
steps into the court immediately after his 
pass to B2 and before the throw-in to B3. 

Ruling: Throw-in violation. Award ball 
to A at spot Bl was awarded the ball out of 
bounds for his throw-in. After a violation, 
unless it is basket interference by B, the 
ball must be thrown in from out of bounds 
spot designated by an official. 

8. Play: Al is dribbling ball in back 
court, attempting to advance to the front 
court, when 10 second count expires. 

Ruling : Ball is awarded to team B at out- 
of bounds spot nearest to spot at which ball 
was when the 10-second count expired. 

9. Play: What are the established guide- 
lines for the administration of Rule 9, Sec- 
tion 10, ("A PLAYER SHALL NOT— Ex- 
cessively swing his arm or elbows, even 
though there is no contact with an op- 
ponent") ? 

Ruling: To equitably interpret this pro- 
vision, understanding of its purpose is nec- 
essary. To fail to understand the purpose 
will permit some exploitation of the rule. In 
applying it, judgment must be used. 
(Continued on Page Six) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



DECEMBER, 1962 VOL. XXV— NO. 5 

PobUahed monthlF, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexingrton, Ky. 

Entered bb second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexingion, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georeetown 

Vice-President Cecil A. Thornton (19G0-64), Harlan 

Directors — Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman 
Gish (1962-63), Greenville: Preston Holland (1961-65), Murray; 
Don R. Rawlines (1961-65), Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1962- 
66), Louisville: Oran C. Teatcr (1960-64). Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate Jl.OO Per Year 



[iom 



the C< 



ommissionei $ 



Offi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1962 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



Delegate Assembly Members 

Members to the Deleg-ate Assembly at the forth- 
coming 1963 annual meeting of the Association were 
elected by the principals of K. H. S. A. A. member 
schools on ballots returned to the State Office before 
November 15. There were several ties in the voting 
for delegats and alternate. These ties were broken 
recently, with the delegates and alternates involved 
being detei-mined by lot. The names of the district 
I'epresentatives are as follows: 

Delegates 

(1) 0. J. Mitchell, (2) Bradford D. Mutchler, (3) 
Howard V. Reid, (4) William B. Miller, (5) Kenneth 
T. Hardin, (6) David Siria, (7) F. B. Simpson, (8) 
Jimmy Harris, (9) James M. Lynch, (10) J. W. Dun- 
can, (11) L. D. Knight, (12) Lawrence McGinnis, (13) 
Stuart Pepper, (14) Bowman Davenport, (15) Charles 
S. Combs, (16) James P. Hill, (17) Kenneth Harvey, 
(18) Jim Young, (19) Edwin Mayes, (20) Cortez 
Butler, (21) E. E. Tate, (22) Wilbur Smith, (23) 
Kenneth Riddle, (24) Robert L. Robertson, (25) 
Brother Aubin, (26) A. J. Ries, (27) J. C. Cantrell, 
(28) K. B. Farmer, (29) George E. Valentine, (30) 
Bill Han-ell, (31) A. L. Roberts, (32) Palmore Lyles, 
(33) Don Davis, (34) Charles L. Lett, (35) George 
Houston, (36) Harold Miller, (37) William L. Hamp- 
ton, (38) Jarvis Parsley, (39) Elza Whalen, (40) 
Milton 0. Traylor, (41) Charles 0. Dawson, (42) 
Robert B. Turner, (43) John Heber, (44) Roy N. 
Walters, (45) Homer L. Profitt, (46) Dienzel Dennis, 
(47) Vei-non Miniard, (48) C. Frank Bentley, (49) 
Henry Garrison, (50) Clinton B. Hammons, (51) W. 
M. Slusher, (52) Fred Parsons, (53) Goebel Ritter, 
(54) James Caudill, (55) J. B. Goff, (56) Elbert 
Hudson, (57) Fred W. Cox, (58) Don Wallen, (59) 
Paul Wright, (60) Neil Hunley, (61) Letcher Norton, 
(62) Ewell Smoot, Jr., (63) Harold Holbrook, (64) 
Robert Wright. 

Alternates 

(1) Tom Adkins, (2) Don Stephenson, (3) James 
A. Pickard, (4) L. P. Miller, (5) John E. Floyd, (6) 
Charles N. Boozer, (7) Arthur Wallace, (8) Harold 
Ross, (9) Eldon Bradley, (10) Thomas Brantley, (11) 
J. David Boyken, (12) W. P. Wheeler, (13) W. 0. 



Jackson, (14) W. Foyest West, (15) Bryan Taylor, 
(16) Wayne Ewing, (17) Jay Atkerson, (18) Howard 
Owens, (19) James L. Poynter, (20) Lindle Castle, 
(21) Charles F. iMartin, (22) H. D. Puckett, (23) 
Damon Ray, (24) T. T. Etheredge, (25) Brother 
Hilaire, (26) Joe Howard, (27) H. L. Hatfield, (28) 
Charles Bruce, (29) Denzil Ramsey, (30) Alvin C. 
Hanlev, (31) McCoy Tarry, (32) Ralph Blakey, (33) 
Mote Hils, (34) Edgar McNabb, (35) Tom Daley, 
(36) Richard Hehman, (37) Joe H. Anderson, (38) 
Jesse Amburgey, (39) Clay Evans, (40) Joe E. Sabel, 
(41) Ronald Connelly, (42) Billy Lockridge, (43) 
Clyde T. Lassiter, (44) Bill Davis, (45) Lairy Wood- 
en, (46) Larry Travis, (47) Johnnie Ray Laswell, 
(48) Clark E. "Chesnut, (49) Walter H. Power, (50) 
Charles D. Black, (51) Chester L. Click, (52) Lee P. 
Jones, (53) D. C. Taylor, (54) Raymond Hamblin, 
(55) Fairce Woods, (56) Estil G. Chaney, (57) J. H. 
Cromer, (58) Pete Grigsby, (59) Paul Wade Trimble, 
(60) Leonai-d F. Carpenter, (61) Lewis Snowden, (62) 
Reedus Back, (63) Jack Fultz, (64) Thomas N. McCoy. 



In Memoriam 

GLENN 0. SWING 

Glenn 0. Swing, 72, former Superinten- 
dent of Covington City Schools and former 
President of the Kentucky High School Ath- 
letic Association, died at William Booth Me- 
morial Hospital, Covington, on November 
14, 1962. 

A native of Bethel, Ohio, Mr. Swing had 
been Superintendent of Covington schools 
for thirty-four years before his retirement 
two years ago. He was one of the early K. H. 
S. A. A. leaders soon after the Association 
was formed, and was named president of the 
K. H. S. A. A. for the 1928-29 period. 

Mr. Swing was a member of the Boards 
of Regents of Eastern Kentucky State Col- 
lege, Richmond, and Villa Madonna College, 
Covington. He also was a member of Trinity 
Episcopal Church., Covington Rotary Club, 
Indra Consistory of Scottish Rite, Norman 
Barnes American Legion Post No. 70, the 
American Asso'ciation of School Adminis- 
trators, and the National Education Assoc- 
iation. 

A 32nd degree Mason, Mr. Swing belong- 
ed to Golden Rule Lodge No. 345, F. & A. M. 
He was a past president of the Cincinnati 
Schoolmasters Club, and he was on the board 
responsible for locating the huge Internal 
Revenue Service and data-processing center 
being built at Covington. He held A. B. and 
M. A. degrees from Ohio State University, 
and did postgraduate work at tihe University 
of Cincinnati. 

Survivors are his wife, Mrs. Linda Con- 
rey Swing; a son, Kenneth C, Hamilton, 
Ohio; a daughter, Mrs. Marguerite Knauf, 
Fort Thomas, Kentucky; two brothers, Phil 
B. and John C. Swing, both of Cleveland, 
Ohio and a sister, Miss Edna B. Swing. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



Page Three 



HAZARD — E. K. M. C. AND REGION IV, DISTRICT 2, CLASS AA CHAMPION 




(Left to Riffht) Front Row: Ronnie Joseph, David Bailey, Freddy Thomas, Jerry Pigman, Benny Figman, Ed 
Stacy. Dennie Sinor, A. J. Davis, Ed Bellis, Don Bailey, John Stone. Second Row: Jack Robinson. Roger Cecil, 
Alva Hollon, Charles Panky, Jerry Cornett. Bob Marcum, Bob Muncy, Richard Magee, Royal Osborne, Lynn 
Pennington, Ken Tate, Butch Green. Third Row: Mgr. Charles Noplis, Mgr. Anderson Panky, Mgr. Bill Engle. 
Curt Duff, Jerry Combs, Greg Stout, David Olinger, Marvin Benning, David Standford, Dwight Smith, Freddy 
Bamett, Doug Francis. 

MCKELL — NORTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Jim Heliums, Roy Glispie, Marcella Howard, Carol Nickel, Regina Hieneman, 
Karen Miller, Cheri Lcmaster, Bob Munn, Danny Mercer. Second Row: Randall Bruce, Sam French, Ben Car- 
ver, Charles Keibler, David Horton, Phil Bentley, David Spears, Bob Collins, Jim Slater, David Chaffins, Carl 
Munn, Gary Sammons. David Harr. Third Row: Coach Tom Sims, Carlos Stone, Bill Traylor, David Wright, 
Bob Nickel, Raymond Munn, Jack Flannery, Jim Simpson, Bill Wagner, Bill Hayden, Walter Riggs, Fred Tim- 
berlake. Coach Chester Bruce. 

MIDDLESBOROUGH — SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Bobby Ramsey. Jim Has'it, Jim Page, Bob Sowders, Jay Crawford, Fred Jeffers, 
Harry Hayes, Jay Creech, Phil Hafer, Bill Chedester, Ton Stanley, Dan Hamilton. Second Row: Kermit Owens, 
Henry Barnes, Gaither Medley, Bobby Lawson, Bob Barrett, Joe Cosby, Don Meyers, Canie Smith, Ed Pass, 
Tom Barton, David Davis, Mike Wiliiford. Third Row: Mgr. Denny Pass, Bob Watt, Doug Rains, Ed Gilbert, 
David Dalton, George Cadle, David Jenkins, Ed Barton, Charles Collins, Gary Asher, Tom Chedester, Floyd 
Henson, Vaughn Hill, Mgr. Ed Overton. Fourth Row: Dewey England, Bill Tumblazer, Gary Medley, John 
Essary, Steve Chappell, Wayne Garmon. Larry Idol, James Johnson, Joe Moycrs, Larry Asher, Rodney Buck- 
ner, Lonny Barnes, Mike Blondell, Wallace Bolton. Johnny O'Boyle. Fifth Row: Ass't, Coach Darrell Storm, 
Head Coach Dave Hurst, Ass't. Coach Lawrence Kuhl. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



The Flying Dutchman 

The Christmas Season is a good time to 
explain to Kentuckians the meaning of the 
Corn Cob Pipe Awards, the Game Guy A- 
wards, and the Abou Ben Adhem Citations. 
The principle supporting all of these pre- 
lects is based on the philosophy of Christian- 
ity. 

The Corn Cob Pipe Award is generally 
made through the mail, although in some cit- 
ies and towns a Club or Chapel program is 
arranged where the award is presented. If 
you know a Kentuckian who has rendered 
unselfish service of any kind, your letter of 
recommendation to The Flying Dutchman 
means he will find a miniature statuette of 
a Kentucky Thoroughbred with a Corn Cob 
Pipe around his neck in his mail box. Both 
the race horse and the pipe are symbols of 
Kentucky. 

There have been times when winners 
were announced that letters arrived saying, 
"Dutchman, that Corn Cob Pipe Winner is a 
stinker." Maybe he is and maybe the writers 
of the letters are wrong! One thing is cer- 
tain, the Winner did perform an unselfish 
deed for somebody in order to qualify. 

The following poem from A PARISH 
PAPER points out that we should all be ob- 
jective in our evaluation of our fellowmen: 
SURPRISE 

I dreamed Death came the other night, 

And Heaven's gate swung wide ; 

With kindly grace, 

An angel ushered me inside. 

And there to my astonishment. 

Stood folks I'd known on earth ; 

Some I'd judged and labeled as, 

"Unfit," or "Little Worth." 

Indignant words rose to my lips, 

But never were set free; 

For every face showed stunned surprise — 

NO ONE EXPECTED ME ! ! 

The Lionheart and Game Guy Awards 
are sent to the Kentuckian who nominates 
a boy or girl who is overcoming a physical 
handicap to engage in sports. That individ- 
ual is responsible for the proper presentation 
of the Lionheart Awards. As soon as you 
notify the Dutchman of a kid with the 
"heart of a lion" who is refusing to be beaten 
by a physical handicap, that youngster mer- 
its the miniature statuette known as "The 
Lionheart Award." In April, every boy or 
girl who has won a Lionheart Award is con- 
sidered for the title of "GAME GUY OF 
KENTUCKY for the current year." The 
lionhearted boy or girl who is judged by a 
Committee to have overcome the greatest 
physical ^handicap receives the Games Guy 




THE DUTCHMAN 

Award at a State-Wide Dinner, honoring 
him during K. E. A. in Louisville. 

The Abou Ben Adhem Award is for 
communities, clubs, schools, or other groups 
who promote good neighbor relations, at- 
tempting to replace hatred and envy between 
communities with brother'hood and friend- 
ship. If you know of a group promoting this 
principle of Christianity, recommend it for 
the Abou Ben Adhem Citation. 

There you have the explanation of the 
projects of The Flying Dutchman which were 
initiated in 1949. There have been many 
Game Guy, Coim Cob Pipe, and Abou Ben 
Adhem Winners since then; but here are 
the winners for the month of December : 

W. L. Gardner, Principal of Park City 
High School, at Park City, Kentucky, is the 
winner of the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor A- 
ward because of his interest in boys and girls 
who are physically handicapped and because 
of the countless hours given beyond the call 
of duty, trying to make lives happier for un- 
fortunate youngsters. 

David Wood of Barren County, who was 
a nominee for the Game Guy Award in 1961, 
again receives a nomination for this year. 
When only two (2) years of age, David burn- 
ed both of his feet so badly that his fight 
against his handicap is outstanding. 

The Pleasure Valley Optimist Club re- 
ceives the Abou Ben Adhem award because 
of its promotion of friendly relations between 
communities of Jefferson County. 

Wherever you live in Kentucky, look for 
people rendering unselfish service, encourage 
crippled kids, and commend groups promo- 
ting brotherhood and friendship. Follow up 
your work and interest with a recommenda- 
tion for recognition addressed to : THE FLY- 
ING DUTCHMAN. KENTUCKY HIGH 
SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION, BOX 
1173., LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY. 
A MERRY CHRISTMAS, KENTUCKIANS! 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



Page Five 



CORBIN — CLASS AA FINALIST 




(Left to Rieht) Front Row: Mgr. Bill Mayne, Frank II a 
Daniels, Vernon Rader. Dennis Goodin. Don Savior. Eddi, 
Cowan, Joe Burton, Mgr. Carl Stewart. Second Row: Ma 
Stanley Yonce, Bob Cowan. Tom Alexander. Tom Kring 
Larry Adams. Carl Stewart, Clyde Amburn. Third Row : 



nmons. Bill Wilder, Bill Hooyer. Charles Selvy. Larry 
Bolton. Lonnie Lanham. Ted Trosper. Ronnie Me- 
lon Woolum. Bill Black, Dayid Taylor, Mickey Wilson. 
Ronnie Meadors, Charles Steinmetz, Garry Frederick, 
ch Bob Cathers. Coach Ledger Howard, To 



Howard Saylor, Richard Hamlin. Lee Roy Harrell. Kerny Cox, David Burton, Jim Goodi) 
Root, Scotty Russell, Barry Rose. Jerry Amburn. Dennis McKeehan, Caoch Bill Adkins 



Walker, Amon 



OWENSBORO — BIG EIGHT AND REGION I CLASS AA CHAMPION 




7B<: 







(Left to Right 1 Front K.)w: Jerry Abbott, Bill n.mirlas, David 
Duneghy, George Moore, LaVelton Kennedy. Jim Brown, Ronnii 
Woodward, Dickie Pitman, Walter Mayes, Jerry Fisher, John Hafendo 
Row: Coaches Jack Hicks, Don Netoskie, J. N. Kendall; George Ev 
Showers, Walter Meschko, Jim Henderson, Bill Ralston, Charles Willia 



imie Stinnett, Hui:h 
Harold King, Bobby 
Dickie Moore, Don Hayden. Second 
n Gordon, Bill Moorman, Norman 
, Jerry Newbolt, Mike Tooley. Danny 



Watkins, Sam Freeman. Herb Kendall. Coach Tom Wi herspoon. Coach Bill VanWinkle, Head Coach Ralph 
Genito, Third Row: Langston Duneghy, Jerry Elliott, Bob iliil, D?yid Valentine, Jerry Goodwin, James "Dickie" 



Moore, Steve Quill, Brent Mallor 
ner, Terry Tyler, Frank Cha 
waite, Ray Kassinger, Bruce 



Larry Moore, Danny Giili: 
Wayne Rouse, Jack Ki; 
lers, John Welch, 



SHELBYVILLE — CENTRAL KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Gamer, Floyd, Broughton, Hardesty, Hall, Davis, Swigert, Brown, Hays, Hack- 
worth. Second Row: Dixon, Beatty, Gordon, Wainscott, Mitche;!, Kelly, Lindsey, Catlett, Scearce, Hill, Aldridge, 
Turner, Stanley. Third Row: R. Simpson, Tracey, Saurders, Ballard, Crawford, Harrod, Gillock, Thompson, 
Clifton, Ray. Fourth Row: Morton, Edwards, Long, Settle, McBride, Bemiss, Frazier, Bustle, McGinnis, Tingle, 
Mf Simpson, Bailey. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



LILY — REGION IV, DISTRICT 1, CLASS A CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgr. Layton Cobb. Walt Smith. Gary Evans. Hansel .McllarKue. Van Slucher, 
James Westerfield. Second Row: Jack Spitser. Charles Peters, Earl Lunstord. Phil Lowry. Ron Smith. Kenny 
Taylor. David Callahan, Troy Davis. Third Row: Coa h Joe Lankford, John Jones. Don Mitchell. Bob Helton, 
Jamon Halvaksz, Ryarrion Vires. Everett Setser. Ron Saylor, Gienn Hale, Coach Roy Cochran. Fourth Row: 
Ralph Smith, Glenn Cornett, Ernest Thompson, Virgil Boggs, Gary Wagers. Russ Morris, Don Shepherd, Wayne 



Shelton. 

BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(C&ntinued from Page One) 

The coverage was adopted to eliminate a 
vicious practice which had been increasing. 
Its proper administration will prohibit any 
advantage which might be gained by a player 
excessively swinging his arms and/or elbows 
and secondly, it will prevent the possibility 
of serious injuries which may result from 
such action. 

Of necessity, certain basketball rules 
coverage must be stated in general terms. To 
specify situations would usually require a 
long listing and this have been proven to be 
an unsatisfactory method of providing rules 
coverage. This is the reason for the general 
terms used in 9-10. 

If a violation were called and the bail 
caused to become dead because a B player 
excessively swung this elbows while Al was 
driving toward his basket with a scoring 
play in progress or because B so violated 
while the ball was in flight on a try, the de- 
fense could gain an advantage from an illegal 
act. Therefore, in these situations, this viola- 
tion will be ignored. When team A has player 
or team control, only in an unusual circum- 
stance will this violation by B be penalized. 
Either team guilty of the violation during a 
jump ball, while the ball is being rebounded 
or is loose on the floor, will be penalized. If 



A violates When A is in control or during 
a try, it will be penalized. 

An advantage resulting from excessive 
swinging of the arms and or elbows can al- 
most always be obtained only when it is done 
in congested areas, such as under a back- 
board or in getting into position to secure a 
loose ball ; or when a player with the ball is 
attempting to keep a defensive player or 
players away from him and thereby avoiding 
a held ball. 

The interpretation for 9-10 is as follows 
and application of the precepts will provide a 
basis for application to specific situations: 

1. The general principle in the adminis- 
tration of Rule 9-10 is that the violation will 
be ignored if the act is ostensibly for the 
purpose of causing the ball to become dead 
at a time obviously advantageous to the of- 
fending team. 

2. Excessive swinging of the arms and/or 
elbows is a violation and will always be 
penalized when: 

(a) Committed by A when A has player 
or team control or when committed by A 
during a try. 

(b) Committed by B when A has player 
or team control, unless A has a scoring play 
in progress or unless the general principle 
(1), as stated above, is violated or involved. 

(c) Committed by A or B when the ball 
is not in player or team control, except if 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



Page Seven 



MURRAY — REGION I CLASS A CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Ronnie Danner, Ronnie Edwards, Cary Miller, Jimmy Adams, Roy Wyatt, Tommy 
Wells, Norman Hale. Second Row: Don Faughn, Bud Nail, Danny Nix, Ben Hogancamp, Donnie Edwards, Lee 
Vance, Donnie Danner. Third Row: Bernard Harvey, Harry Weatherly, Jimmy Johnson, Don Lee, Steve Sex- 
ton, John Natter. Ralph Jackson. Fourth Row: Craig Banks, CharSie Warren, Alan Valentine, Mike Kuykendall, 
Steve Trevathan, Bill Adams, Eddie West. Fifth Row: Jim Hart. Ricky Tidwell, Jimmy Wilkins, John Sam- 
mons, Joe Cohoon, Don Blalock, Johnny Bennett. Sixth Row: Edwin Larson, Steve Seville, Sammy Knight, 
Phil Barber, Steve Doran, Jimmy Nichols. 



the violation is by B and occurs during a try. 
In a rare situation, excessively swinging 
the arms and/or elbows without contact 
could be interpreted as unsportsmanlike and 
a technical foul result. This would, however, 
be a most unusual circumstance and the 
technical foul should be applied only after 
due consideration. 

10. Play: Al throws the ball at his basket 
in a field goal attempt, (a) A2; or (b) B2 ex- 
cessively swings his elbows,, intimidating his 
opponents for the purpose or intent of secur- 
ing a favorable position in case there is a 
rebound. 

Ruling: Violation in (a) and the ball is 
awarded B for a throw-in at spot nearest 
violation. In (b), the violation is ignored, for 
to penalize would cause the ball to become 
dead immediately, thereby depriving team A 
of a possible field goal because of a violation 
byB. 

11. Play: As Al is advancing tihe ball in 
his back court, B5, in front court of A, ex- 
cessively swings his elbows and/or arms. 

Ruling: Violation. Ball is awarded to A 
for a throw-in at spot nearest violation. 

12. Play : During a jump ball or while ball 
is loose on the floor, Al or Bl excessively 
swings his elbows and/or arms. 

Ruling: Violation in both situations and 
opponents of the offender are awarded the 
ball for a throw-in from spot nearest the 
violation. 

13. Play: While Al has the ball in his 



hand, out of bounds for a throw-in, A5 fouls 
B2. 

Ruling: Personal foul. B2 is awarded a 
free throw, or free throws, as the situation 
warrants. This is not a foul committed by a 
player while he or a teammate is in control. 

14. Play: A6 is listed in the score book 
with an illegal number. Is this a technical 
foul ? 

Ruling: Wearing an illegal number ap- 
plies only to a player. Therefore, it becomes 
a technical foul only when a player wearing 
such a number enters the game. The violation 
occurs when he has been recognized by the 
official. 

15. Play: Al, in his front court, throws 
a high hard pass to A2, who is near the divi- 
sion line. Bl touches the pass in A's front 
court and it then goes across the division line 
to A's back court, where the ball is recovered 
by A2. 

Ruling: No violation because a player of 
team A was not the last to touch the ball be- 
fore it went into A's back court. 

16. Pipy : Before a free throw has touched 
the ring or backboard, A2, in the second lane 
space,: (a) breaks a vertical plane of the 
side edge of the area between lane space one 
and lane space two with his foot ; or (b) steps 
on the floor directly behind and within two 
feet of the lane space mark or neutral zone 
mark ; or (c) extends his arms over the area 
between the lane spaces. 

Ruling: Violation in either (a) or (b). 
Legal in (c) if there is no contact. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



VALLEY — CLASS AAA FINALIST 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mike Cale, Tommy Disney, Don Jatrgers. David Hess, Kenny Vincent. Johnny 
Lobred, Butch Walters, Danny Harms, James Pope. Lead Coach Dallas Arnold. Second Row: Kenny Wilson, 
Norman Morgan, Louis Crozier, Wayne Sharp, Larry Jones. Jim Clark. Dan Finlinson. Joe Banks. Third Row: 
Coach Irv Spencer, Danny Roberts. John Mayfield, Ru.ssell Kersey, Danny Wade, Barry Cohn, Roy McCoy, Dick 
Chetwynd, Danny Dohn. Fourth Row: Mgr. Bob Manchan. Sidney Hall. Kendal Windosr, Clyde McConnaughay, 
Mike McConnell. J. Martin. Tom Troutman. Fifth Row: Mgr. Eubanks. Mgr. Anderson, Larry Stringer, Jim 
McKenzie, Marshall Perry, Donnie Lowe, Coach John StoH. 



n official listed, it 
designated. If two 
that of the home phone. 

Henderson, VA 7-1322. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled December 1) 

If one telephone number is given fo: 
is the home phone number unless o 
numbers are given, the first number 

Abernathy, George, 324 North El: 

JE 3-6421 

Ballard, Shirley, Snowfall Drive, Winchester, 744-5344 
Barlow, Bill B.. 3050 Lynnwood Drive, Paris, 987-1947, Lex- 
ington 2-2220 Ext. 4263 
Baskin, Sylvester, 148 1st St., Lynch, 848-5637 
Bishop, Heulyn, 225 Kenwood Blvd., Russell, 836-5906 
Bradshaw, Johnny Louis, 206 West High St., Springfield. 336- 

7200, Lebanon 692-9916 
Brashear, Loy Ray, 607 Mantle, Elizabethtown, RO 5-2307 
Bridgemah, John Kay. 212 High St., Monticello, FI 8-2827 
Broaddus, William D.. Ky. Central Hotel, Campbellsville, 465- 

4111 
Brockman, Gerald Kenneth, 2202 Lytle St., Louisville 12, SP 

2-0511, JU 2-3511 ext. 305 
Brown, James A., 500 Blane Drive, Hopknisville, TU 6-6308 
Brown. John W., 975 Waverly Drive, Lexington, 2-0954, 2-3212 
Broyles, Bobby, 315 Mulberry, Hartford, 298-3859 
Brueck, Joe C, 2012 Wayandotte, Owensboro, MQ 4-3791 
Burchett, Charles, P. O. Box 196, Kermit, W. Va. 
Burks, Rucker W., Box 15. Fort Knox. 4-4066, 4-5655 
Burris, John F., Jr., 14-B Dixon Apt. Henderson, 7-1184 
Bushofsky, Jack, Box 1611 A. P. S. C, Clarksville, Tenn., 645- 

9058 
Cassady, Charles W., 1127 Kentucky St., Bowling Green, VI 

3-9538 
Clark, Owen B., 106 Kentucky Ave., Georgetown, 2047, Lex- 
ington 2-8717 
Clary, Kenneth, 435 Cherry, Henderson, VA 7-3320 
Cobb, Douglas C. Box 163 South Hall, Western Ky. St. College. 

Bowling Green. VI 6-4647 
Collier. Burnard, 237 High St., Pikeville, GE 437-4344 
Conley, Elzie, Jr., Route No. 2. Box 86, Salyersville, FI 9-3552, 

FI 9-4544 
Conley, Richard O., Oil Springs, CY 7-3197 
Conway, James M., 250 Lookout Ave., Frankfort, CA 7-4268, 

CA 7-2206 
Cowan, Samuel Lewis, c/o Union College, Barbourville 
Cox. Colin Kelly, Hazard 

Craig, Ronald, Route No. 2, Versailles, 873-4949 
Craft, Bill, 140 Vanderbilt. Lexington, 7-4843, 4-9223 
Croft, Lewis E.. Hopkinsville. TU 6-7610, TU 5-9933 
Crook, Bill, 313 4th St., Corbin, 2411, 20 

Davis, Curt, 1119 E. Burnett, Louisville, ME 4-4959, JU 2-3611 
DeGroote. James, 2905 E. Mulberry, Evansville, Indiana GR 
6-5497, HA 5-6211 ext. 214 



Derrickson. Richard, 621 Cardinal Lane, Lexington, 7-4557 
Detzel, Thomas C, 2849 Lawndale, Box 12, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

RE 1-7662. PA 1-2200 ext. 321 
Dixie, Cornelius P., 608 South Clay. Louisville, JU 7-7680 
Durkin, Jack. 291 Burke Road. Lexington, 4-4396, 4-1717 
Duvall, Larry, East Adair, Owenton. 484-2444, 484-2122 
Edwards, Jimmy. Falls of Rough, 879-3565 
Elkin, William T., Route No. 1. Jonesville 

English. Herbert T., Jr., Box 205 Covered Bridge Road, Pros- 
pect, CA 8-1538 
Evans, Larry Wayne. Route No. 4, Williamstown, TA 4-7451 
Ezell, Clendon, Route 4, Hopkinsville, TU 6-4511, TU 6-1261 
Fannin, Ben, Betsy Lavne. GR 8-2344, GR 8-2255 
Farish, Merlin Joseph. Irvington. Brandenburg 422-6161 (Bus.) 
Farmer, John Clay, Methodist Home, Versailles. 873-4481, 873- 

4481 
Farris. Joseph T.. Route No. 
Ferrell, Doctor T.. 409 Greenbriar. 
Fitzner, Donald R., 3907 Oakle 

582-3611 
Flynn. Alton, 189 Swigert Ave., Lexington, 4-9191 (Bus.) 
Fowler, Charles, 5214 Woodhill Lane, Louisville 19, 969-0369, 

GL 4-7511 
Fredricks, Rex. 123 East 6th St., London 
Gaines, Harvey, 1039 South 38th St., Louisville, SP 8-3854 
Gamble, Gerald E., Hospital Road, Dawson Springs, SW 7-2268 
Gentile. Robert Michael, 3103 Roselawn Blvd., Louisville 20, 
GL 8-7340 

1974 Deer Park Ave., Louisvil 



Chester. PI 4-2012 
Lexington, 7-4273, 4-0301 

Louisville, 964-1866, 



Gering. Paul G., 

TW 5-6765 
Giffin, John S., 
Edgar 



451-2402, 



Box 251 College Station, Murray 
Route No. 1, Box 130, Drakesboro 
(3oins, Homer, Evarts. 1361, 1361 
(Joldsmith, Bill, Box 682, Maysville. 664-5466 
Graves, Robert L., 3810 Garland, Louisville, SP 8-4076 



Route No. 



Bowling Gr 



842-3965, 



Greathouse, Bobby 

VI 3-4146 
Green, Walter, Hazard 

Greer, Jim, 636 Kelly, Harlan. 2233 (Bus.) 
Greene. Jerry. 431 Bamberger Road. Lexington. 
Grisham, Jesse R., 1527 Roosevelt, Henderson, 

7-1941 
Hale, John, Box 432, Harlan, 2131, 563 

Hammock, Jack, 309 Indianna Ave., Whitesburg, 633-2345 
Hardin, Don G., Route No. 1, Morehead, 4-5668 (Bus.) 
Harrell. Bill D.. Shelbyville, ME 3-4601, ME 3-2344 
Harris, Charles E.. 517 Belmont Dr.. Bowling Green. VI 3-6680 
Harrison. Freddie W., Route No. 1, Box 441, Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-3965 
Haynes, John, 416 Clay, Henderson, VA 7-6137 
Haynes. William T., 1011 Second St.. Henderson, VA 7-3388 
Herold, Clarence E.. Route No. 1, Box 126C, Sacramento, 

6656 
Hill, Clyde 
Hinkle, Mel 



625- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



Page Nine 



LYNCH EAST MAIN— C. V. C. CHAMPION AND CLASS A FINALIST 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Gary Lewis, Truman McGeorge, Bill Wood, Jackie Pierce, Doc Watts, Don Mor- 
gan. Cliester Molley. Larry Flanary, Carl Smith. Second Row: Coach John Morgan, Carl Walker, Glenn Wood, 
Julius Hodge, Richard Hagy, Vernon Jackson, Ronald Graham, Lynn Pippin, Paul Hoiska, Wayne Robinson. 
Mgr. Carlisle Shepherd. Coach Ed Miracle. Third Row: Clayton Gilley, John Vicin.i Mike O'Bradovich. Joe Top- 
olsky. Dub Potter. Ted Mosley, Larry Cornett, Raymond Zlamal, Don Walters, Gerald Jones. Mgr. David Shep- 
herd, Mgr. Joe Letanosky. Fourth Row: John Paiko, Rtger Jones, Lewis Jones, Roger Greer, Danny Cuzzart, 
Mike Fryar, Danny Russell, Jerry Wells, Tom Estep, John CarroJI, Mgr. Larry Knoll. 

ELIZABETHTOWN — MID-KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 









(Left to Right) Front Row: Easlcy, Dixie. Phillips, Doolittle, Ringo, Crabtree, L. Mace, Manly, Harvie, Reed, 
Spaulding, A. Freeland. Beck. Second Row: D. Freeland, Moore, Felker, Gamer, Daniels, M. Mace. Mayhew, 
Straney, Burks. Tinsley, Allen, Drane. Gains, Maffett. Thrid Row: Gktidie, Bustabad, G^es'in, Joiner, Gray, 
Blacklock, Avery, Gregory, Galvin. Marchell, Payne, Pride, Stone. Fourth Row: Harshman, Epperson, Claggett, 
Cox, Turner, McCubbin, Noblin, Warf, Dorsey, Inman. Fifth Row: Ashcraft, Hogg, Atherton, Butler, Sharer, 
Dusky, Hoskinson, Goff. 



Hogg, Bill, 626 Brown's Lane. Elizabethtown, RO 5-7434, RO 

Holt, Alton R., Box 367, Jamestown, DI 3-7301 

Holt, Dan D., Box 33, College Station, Murray, 762-3625 

Horine, James J.. 141 Romany Road, Lexingion, 6-5352, 6-5352 

Huff, Damond, Hyden 

Huff, Dean, Hyden 

Hughes, Charles, Wayland, 358-4040, 358-2341 

Jenkins. James D., Route No. 1, Bowling Green, 842-3088, VI 

2-B954 
Johnson, Leroy, 252 E. 14th St., Bowling Green 
Kingsbury, G. William, Jr., 210 Edgewood, Ft. Mitchell, ED 

1-1239 
Kitchen, Leslie, 1701 Lindy Lane, Lexington, 3-0396, 5-1575 
Knotts, Franklin D., 5489-H Jamison, Fort Knox, 4-2594, 4-2594 
Larsen, George, 7850-A Estrada, Fort Knox, 4-3484, 4-5733 
Lambert, Irvin, 5110 Rural Way, Louisville 18, 969-4718, GL 

8-1948 
Leasor, Everett, 1040 Clay St., Henderson, VA 6-2978 
Lequire, Harold M., Tucker Apt., Harlan, 1123-J, 2600 
Lester, J. L., Georgetown, 1117-W 



Lewis, James Rogers, 201 West 11th St., Covington 261-7948 
Logue, Ronald G., 514 Maple Ave., Danville, 236-3580, 236-2676 
Long, James E., 103 North 14th St., Murray, PL 3-1306 
Loughry, Vernon H.. Route No. 1, Greenville, 1-474J 
Lyons, Tommy L., Box 112, Beechmont, GR 6-8147 
McBride, Donald R., 1663 Strader Dr.. Lexington, 5-2153 
McDonald. Walter Dixon, 1268 Kentucky. Bowling Green 
McDannoId, Lewis H., 126 Preston Court, Versailles 
McLaughlin, Robert L., 3914 E. Gatewood Lane, Cincinnati, 

Ohio, 793-2449, 241-1822 ext. 368 
Magers, Capt. L. J., 1945 Nashville Rd., Bowling Green, VI 

3-4844 
Marshall, T. N., 404 Wheatly Road, Ashland, 324-1991 
Martin, Woody, Logansport, 728-2155 
Matthews, Robert E., Jr., 2802 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville, 454- 

5476 
Mayfield, Marvin, Squib 
Mays, Ralph J.. Baruourville, 546-3965 

Means, Hugh West, 2704 Florence St., Hopkinsville, TW 5-5993 
Menser, Billy Joe, Route No. 3. Crofton, TU 5-3825 
Miles, Francis M.. 1142 So. 36th St.. Louisville, SP 6-2331 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



HIGHLANDS — N. K. C. AND REGION III CLASS AA CHAMPION 




:3-'S^ 

















mmm^'immmti: iiMiBrim)iiw>» iii'«i<«»««n' i n ,«'— 



(Left to Right) Front Row: K. Alexander. R. Waldenmaver. T. McEIhinney, D. Hoser, B. Bradlev, C. Gran- 
ner. J. Eppstein. H. White. J. Biltz. S. Hicks. D. Birklev, T. Llovd. Second" Kow : M. Lawson. D. Dziech, C. 
Smith, J. Voorhes, C. Kyle. J. Zint, D. Shearer. T. Crawford, E. Rankin, V. Smith, P. Smith, A. Law. Third 
Row: A. First, T. Kellen. J. Flaig. B. Daley, F. Partin, G. Schweitzer, T. Slater, M. Clinkenbeard, R. Hughes, 
J. Ferman, D. Zech. T. Bush. Fourth Row: P. Roth, C. Shenshangr, M. Kuhnhein, M. Roth. C. R. Lyons, S. 
Pratt, S. Ross, B. Rowntree. B. Culbertson. D. Lyle. Fifth Row: Coaches Condron, Sadosky, Hauck, Lawson, 
Murphy, and Herrmann. 



Road. Louisville. SP 4-1728. JU 2-3511 



1025 Madison. Clarksville. Tenn. 
mes. 3023 St. Ann St.. Owensboro, MU 4-3820 

390 High St.. Jenkins. 855, 768 
.. 4143F Lee Village. Ft. Campbell, 439-4447, 



Station WDOC, Prestonsburg, 



India 



HA 



Miller. Jack, 2340 Hube 

ext. 305 
Miller. John D., 
Mills. Gilbert Ja 
Mullins, Ben H. 
Murphy, Phil J 

439-5211 ext. 4823 
Nash. William R., Radii 

2338 (Bus.) 
Newsome. Marley. 109 Division St., Pikeville. GE 7-6782 
Niceley, James E., Jr.. Route No. 2. Utica. PA 9-4534 
Ogle. Pat. Box 116. Hawesville. WA 7-2281 
Okruch. Nicholas, 401 E. 

3-3740. HA 4-3331 ext. 324 
Osborne. Homer L.. 418 Broadway. Hazard. 436-3894. 436-4992 
Osborne. Happy, Box 116. Liberty, 567-6421 
Owen, Harry E.. 232 Lowry Lane. Lexington. 7-9019 
Peden. Harlan C. c/o Lacy School. Route No. 7, Hopkinsville, 

AM 9-2102 (Bus.) 
Pemberton, Ray S.. 421 Berry. Bellevue. 581-9845 
Perkins. Wililam. 481 Erie Road. Lexington 
Phillips, William. Route No. 3, Paducah. 442-1923 
Ping. Denton. Route No. 3. Box 78, Somerset 
Prewitt, Shelby, Route No. 1. Box 16. Rockholds. 1064-J3 
Proffitt. Tony David. 816 Covington, Bowling Green, VI 2-2510. 

VI 2-2510 
Ramey. Herbert Dean. Farmers. St. 4-5153 
Rankin, James M., 2133 W. Chestnut. Louisville, SP 2-7215 
Ricketts, Claude 0.. 10005 3rd Street Road. Valley Station, WE 

7-8610. ME 4-1551 ext. 220 
Robinson. Ed. Route No. 3. Box 606. Pikeville, 639-2038 
Roller, Otis C, 808 Chambery Drive. Louisville 7. TW 5-6356 

JU 7-1121 ext. 219 
Rose. Wally. 623 Southridge. Lexington. 2-7265, 2-7847 
Rupert. Ray. 3185 Arrowhead Drive. Lexington. 7-4481. 4-9306 
Saylor. Lanny Ross. Box 407. Wallins Creek. MO 4-3518. 277 
Scifres, Norman. Hawesville, WA 7-6326 
Scott. Bill. Box 1055. Lynch. 848-5484. 848-5486 
Seale. William E., 1001 Tates Creek, Lexington, 6-8545, 2-2200 

ext. 2872 
Shelton. Benny. 30 
Shirley. Henry L., 

2731 ext. 430 
Siler. Ernest Lee. Verne 
Simms. Wavelan J.. Jr., 289-J Chad Brown St., Providence, 

R. I.. 751-4927. EL 1-6711 
Smith. Edward E., 208 Douglas, Campbellsville 
Smith, Joe N.. Box 65. Beechmont 
Smith. Thomas W., 2915 Sheldon Road, Louisville 18, GL 8- 

3934, JU 2-3511 
Snorton, Claude, Jr., 107 Edmunds, Hopkinsville, TW 6-6675, 

TW 5-8278 
Sparks, Keith E., Jr.. 9805 Gandy Road, Louisville, WE 7-6856, 

EM 6-9511 ext. 273 



Sparrow, Jim, Greenview Drive. Lawrenceburg, 939-4157 
Stamper, G. Robert, 19-C Fennyrile Apt., Hopkinsville, TW 

Stafford, Clyde. Jr., 34 West 11th St., Newport, HE 1-3952, 

HE 1-3952 
Steely, Stanley E.. Mt. Ash. 4-8318 

Stewart. Lawrence. Jr., Barbourville, LI 6-3179 (Bus.) 
Stewart, Ted, Apt. No. 1 College Courts. Barbourville. LI 6-3615 
Stout. Charles H.. Box 508 Haggin Hall, Univ. of Ky., Lex- 
ington. 2-2200 ext. 6795 (Bus.) 
Sutphin. William C 2810 Central. Ashland, 324-8028. 324-2136 
Swim. Gerald. Box 323. Evarts, 7-2836 

Taylor, Billy Joe, Route No. 1. Box 880. Pikeville. GE 7-4874 
Taylor, Morris M.. Jr., Route No. 3, Eubank, 379-3557. 679-1574 
Taylor. Rogers E., Route No. 1, Grandview Drive, Owensboro, 

MU 4-6992. MU 4-7219 
Tharpe. Robert L., 212 Spruce St., Murray, PL 3-4671, PL 3- 

9174 
Theiss, Charles H.. Box 7, Buckner. 279-5291 
Thoma. M. L.. 116 Holly St.. Berea, 986-4702 
Trivette, Dale, Box 223, Virgie, 639-2265, 639-4774 
Turner, Bruce, 1456 High St., Paris, 987-2713, Cynthiana. 9030 
Turner, Tommy, 139 Camden Ave.. Versailles, 873-4661 (Bus.) 
VanHoose, Edgar N., Box 871, Paintsville, 789-4182, 789-4880 
Vice. Charles Graham. Route No. 1. Winchester Road. Mt. 

Sterling, 1502-J 
Walker, William John, 124 Orchard Heights. Box 1239. Murray 
Wallace. Robert Keith. Box 1523 Bowman Hall. Univ. of Ky., 

Lexington 2-2200 ext. 8668 (Bus.) 
Walsh, Herschel N., 547 Bishop. Madisonville. TA 1-5526 
Walton. Roy. 148 Vanderbilt Ave., Lexington, 7-2241, 7-5122 
Wanchic, Nick. Route No. 6, Berea Road, Lexington, 5-1233, 

Welborn. Curtis. Box 4. Dunmor 

Wells. Jimmy. 106 Greenwood Drive. Nicholasville. 885-4364. 

885-4191 
West, Richard A., 626 Manchester St., Barbourville 
White, Charles Woodford. Route No. 2. Mt. Sterling. 1846. 266 
White. John Wayne, 126 Balsinger. London, 864-2653, 864-2207 
Wiles, Ed, Box 732, Owensboro, CO 4-5213 
Williams, Jack A., 1639 MacArthur Dr., Evansville, Indian a 
Willis, Robert Kenneth, 640 Hampton. Bowling Green, 3-4458 
Willis, Russell Lee, 1403 State St.. Bowling Green. 843-4769 
Wirtz. Leonard F., 4439 Reading Road, Cincinnati, Ohio, 931- 

1468, 531-0711 
Witherspoon, Thomas B., 908 Christopher Greenup, Owensboro, 

MU 4-3949 
Woodward, J. William. Jr.. 1308 Old Mill Rd.. Lyndon. 425-1428, 

895-0667 
Wray, Robert F., 29 Belle Monte, So. Ft. Mitchell. 331-2674, 

261-2331 
Wright, Raleigh, Broad Bottom 
Yessin, Humzey, 1024 Castleton Way South, Lexington, 6-4092, 

6-1168 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



Page Eleven 



STATE TOURNAMENT INFORMATION 

The 1963 State High School Basketball Tourna- 
ment will be held in Freedom Hall, LouisvDle, on 
March 13-16. The first session is scheduled for Wed- 
nesday night. Three sessions will be held on Thursday, 
two on Friday, and two on Saturday. 

At some time in the month of December the Com- 
missioner will send K.H.S.A.A. member schools forms 
which may be used in requesting passes to the tourna- 
ment. These forms may be returned on and after Jan- 
uary 2. 

Com.plete sets of tickets are priced at $10.00 (end 
bleacher seats), $16.00 (chair back seats and end box 
seats), and $20.00 (box seats at the side of the floor). 
The general sale of tickets (not school oraers) will 
be conducted by State Tournament Tickets Sales, P.O. 
Box 1173, Lexington. These orders should not be placed 
before February 1. The amount of 25c should be added 
to each remittance (not school orders) to pay for 
postage and insurance charges. Orders mailed prior 
to February 1 will receive lower priority than those 
mailed on that date. 

Hotels, moiels and other lodging places in the 
Louisville area will begin taking reservations after 
the first of the year. The Housing Bureau of the 
Louisville Chamber of Commerce, will assist in secur- 
ing rooms for those who are unable to get lodging 
by writing directly to the places of their preference. 
Such requests should be addressed to Louisville Cham- 
ber of Commerce, Housing Bureau, Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. 



CORRECTIONS 1962-63 
BASKETBALL RULES PUBLICATIONS 

I RULES BOOK: 

(a) 6-7-g: (9-2 to 9) should be (9-2 to 10). 

(b) 6-7-Exception: Replace 10-6 Note with 2-10 
in last sentence. 

(c) 7-4: Reference in (c) should be 9-11 instead 
of 9-10. 

(d) 7-5: Second line should be "Section 2-10' 
rather than "Sections 2-9." 

(e) 9-3: In second paragraph, item (a) should be 
designated as (d) and item (b) as (e). 

(f) 10-1-c: Reference should be 9-3(d) instead 
of (b). 

(g) Page 34: Year designation in heading should 
be 1962-63. 

II CASE BOOK: 

(a) P.S. 12 IB: In second sentence, change B2 to 
A2 and B3 to A3. 

(b) P.S. 137: In (e), ruling should be "A6 may 
not enter." 

(c) P.S. 328: Foul by A2 in (a) is interpreted to 
be intentional. See P.S. 219C. 

III PLAYER HANDBOOK: 

(a) Page 8: In ninth line of paragraph, "try for 
control" should be changed to "try lor goal." 

(b) Page 19, Line 4: Should be changed to read 
"players of B to foul Al." 

(c) Page 26, second sentence: Control may not 
end because of touching in front court, but touching 
in front court does stop 10-second count. 

(d) Page 32, Question 3: Third line should begin 
"after clock starts" rather than "second live ball." 

(e) Page 37, Line 21: Comments on Table J, not 
K. 

(f) Page 39, Play 34: No free throws are award- 
ed. 



(g) Page 43, Item 11: Third line should be "clock 
starts." 

IV MEETING FOLDER: 

(a) Page 1, Question 18: Correct answer is "clock 
starts" instead of "ball becomes alive." 

(b) Page 3, 9-10: Rule applies to all players, not 
only to player "in possession." 



Extra Curricular Activities 

So much that is being written and heard 
today about "extra-curricular" activities in 
tihfe schools is giving, I am afraid, an unfair 
evaluation of their worth. There is nothing 
inherently wrong with an activities program 
which supplements and enriches a basic 
scholastic program and gives added oppor- 
tunities for over-all student development in 
accordance with the aims and objectives of 
the school. On the contrary, the life of the 
student is enriched through participation in 
the club program. In fact, many of the 
activities which were once considered "extra" 
are now an integral part of the course offer- 
ings. Band, orchestra, and choral work are 
examples. 

Our concern should be that no activity 
should be overemphasized and that each be 
analyzed in terms of its contribution to the 
over-all objectives of the school. In measur- 
ing its educational values we should ask 
such questions as the following: Is it con- 
ducive to democratic citizenship? Does it 
provide for responsible leadership opportuni- 
ties and for experiences in getting along 
with one another? Does it offer meaningful 
learning experiences? An extra-cumcular 
program in the Louisville Public Schools 
should and does offer opportunities for all 
students to participate in the following 
areas: speech and drama, journalistic and 
creative writing, vocal and instrumental 
music, "subject interests" outside of the 
classroom period, hobbies, athletics and phy- 
sical development, scholastic honor societies, 
student government and service clubs. Social 
clubs and secret societies have no place to- 
day and should not be permitted to function 
in a public school program. 

I congratulate our faculty and adminis- 
trative leadership for their successful at- 
tempts in keeping saneness and balance in 
all of these activities and for their constant 
evaluation of the contributions each is mak- 
ing to the total learning experiences of their 
students. 

— ^Supt. Sam Noe in 
Louisville Public Schools Newsletter 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



PADUCAH TILGHMAN W.K.A.C. & REGION I, DISTRICT I, CLASS AA CHAMPION 







• • m^—fSS f^ < Mf"'"r*gy " 



fl II 



(Left to Riffht) Front Row: B. Brower, J. Wright, A. Todini, B. Black, J. Hartline, M. Johnson, J. Davis, M. 
Bradford, D. Keller, S. Marshall. Second Row: J. Baker, W. Hill, M. McGinnis. G. Hunt, R. Moore, R. Lemon, 
K. Armstrong, J. Humphrey, T. Croom, B. Ayers, W. Tomes. Third Row: J. Curry, R. Gregory, T. Ballowe, P. 
Greenwell. B. Haley, D. Veatch, C. Lowerv, C. Trevathan, L. Schlensker, H. Brown, D. Harris, D. Shauf. 
Fourth Row: P. Lawlev, L. Albritton. M. Pittman, J. Thomas, T. Lamar, J. Brown, M. Anderson, D. Wash- 
burn, R. Kell, J. Houser, R. Mundy. V. Winnett, D. Sharp. Fifth Row: L. Jones. D. Connor, G. Key, B. Sher- 
rill, J. Johnston, G. Blakely, J. Lamb, E. Barker, M. Jones, D. Hill, D. Humphrey. G. Carter, T. Hines. Sixth 
Row: Trainer R. Kemp, Trainer F. Rasche, Mgr. J. Frank, Mgr. B. Bougeno, Mgr. J. Vandergriff. 

Official Dickinson Ratings For The 1962 Football Season 





CLASS A 












REGION 


3 










REGION 1 










Team 




W 


L 


T 


Dickinson 
Rating 


Team 


W 


L 


T 


Rating 


1 


Mt. Sterling 




_ 4 




1 




Murray 


4 








25.00 


2 


Paintsville 




_ 6 





1 


23.13 


Attucks - 


5 


1 





21.25 


3 


Bellevue 




. 4 








20.00 


Russellville 


- 4 


1 





21.25 


4 


Harrison County .. 




- 4 


1 





19.00 


Fulton . ._ _ 


3 


1 





18.75 


5 


Beechwood 




- 3 





1 


18.75 


Franklin Lincoln - 


3 


2 


n 


17.00 


6 


Paris 




_ 3 


1 





17.50 


Henderson Douglass 


2 


2 


1 


17.00 


7 






- 3 


2 





17.00 








High Street 


2 


3 


1 


14.17 


» 


Catlettsburg 




_ 2 


2 





15.00 


Paducah Lincoln 


1 


4 





12.00 


8 


Dayton 




- 2 


2 





15.00 




_ 1 


4 
5 
4 





u 


12.00 
11.67 
10.00 


8 
11 
12 


Morgan County 

Ludlow 




. 2 
- 1 
. 1 


3 
3 




1 




15.00 






14.00 


Morganfield 


.- 


Irvine 




12.50 


Sturgis 


3 








N.R. 


12 


Lloyd 




- 1 


3 





12.50- 


Ft. Campbell 


1 


1 





N.R. 


14 


Millerffburg- Mil. Inrt 




-■ 1 


4 





12.00 


Murray Douglass .. 





3 





N.R. . 


15 


Carlisle 




. 


4 





1,0.00 












15 


Paris Western 




- 


4 





10.00 




REGION 2 






Dickinson 








_ 1 


2 

1 




n 


N.R. 




Elkhorn City 




- 1 


N.R. 


Team 

Versailles _ 


W 
6 


L 




T 




Rating 

26.00 




Raceland 




- 


2 





N.R. 


Old Kentucky Home 


7 


1 





23.75 
















Lebanon 


5 


2 


1) 


22.50 






REGION 


4 








Bardstown 


4 


1 





21.25 






District 1 










Shelbyville 


4 


1 





21.25 














Tompkinsville 


2 

_. 5 


1 
2 


1 




20.63 
20.00 




Team 




W 


L 


T 


Rating 




3 


1 


1 
n 


19.50 
17.50 


2 


London 




- 4 


1 
2 







Lancaster 


- 4 


19.17 


Eminence 


-. 3 


2 





17.50 


3 


Pineville 




- 4 


2 


1 


18.33 




4 


4 





16.25 


4 






_ 3 


3 






Aquinas 


2 


2 





15.00 


t> 


Barbourville 




_ 1 


4 


1 


13.33 


Glasgow 


2 


2 


n 


15.00 


6 


Lynn Camp 




. 


5 





10.00 


Louisville Cty. Day 


2 


2 





15.00 


















2 


2 





15.00 


















2 


3 





15.00 














Dickinson 




3 


7 


n 


13.00 




Team 




W 


L 


T 


Rating 


Stanford 


1 


4 


1 


12.50 


1 


East Main 




- 5 





n 


27.50 




1 


B 
6 
6 





1 


11.67 
11.43 
10.71 


2 
3 
4 


Loyall 




- 4 
. 3 

- 2 


1 
2 
2 







21.25 


Shepherdsville - 


_. 1 


Harlan 




20.00 


Springfield — — _ 


„ 






15.00 


Berea 





4 





io.no 


4 


Wallins - 




2 


2 





15.00 


Bishop David — .. 


1 








N.R. 


6 


Buckhorn 




_ 1 


3 





12.50 


Lincoln Institute 


1 








N.R. 


7 


Dilce Combs 




. 


6 





10.00 


Bate 











N.R. 




West Main 




. 1 


2 





N.R. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



Page Thirteen 



OLD KENTUCKY HOME— MID-KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Woody Cheek, Larry Keelinsr, Don O'Bryan, Eddie Edelen, Tony Haynes. Bob Gas- 
lin. Bob Spaldingr. Second Row: Ken Gordon, Charles Bowman, Billy Welch, William Bradley, Keith Sorrell, 
Herbie Phelps, Charles HcUard, Vic Stansbury, Tommy Hibbs, Leonard Puckctt, William Sympson, Roger 
Ewing, Eddie Keeling, Charles Sidebottom. 



CLASS AA 

REGION 1 

District 1 



REGION 4 
District 1 



W 



W 



w 



Team 

Padueah 4 

Hopkinsville 4 

Caldwell County 7 

Bowling- Green 5 

Franklin-Simpson 2 

Christian County 1 

Mayfield 

Warren County 

District 2 

Team 

Owensboro 6 

Madisonville 4 

Henderson 3 

Henderson County 3 

Daviess County 3 

Owensboro Catholic 1 

Crittenden County 

REGION 2 

Team 

Danville 5 

Lafayette 6 

Somerset 3 

Elizabethtown 2 

Madison 2 

Fort Knox 3 

Franklin County 5 

Bryan Station 3 

Henry Clay 2 

St. Joseph 1 

Oldham County 1 

Clark County 

K, M. I. 1 

LaRue County 1 

Shelby County 

REGION 3 

Team 

Highlands 6 

Ashland 3 

McKell 4 

Holmes 4 

Russell 3 

Boone County 4 

Boyd County 2 

Dixie Heigrhts 1 

Louisa 1 

Wurtland 1 

Newport 1 

Campbell County 

Fleming County 

Newport Catholic 1 

Rowan County __. 1 



W 



Dickinson 




Rating 


2 


27.50 


23.75 


4 


22.50 


19.38 




14.00 




12.50 




10.00 




N.R. 




Dickinson 




Rating 




26.25 


2 
3. 
4 
6. 


18.75 


18.75 


15.71 


14.29 


12.50 




10.00 


8. 


Dickinson 




Rating 




25.63 




22.50 




20.63 




19.50 




19.50 




18.75 


1. 


18.33 




15.71 




16.00 


4. 


15.00 


5. 


12.50 


b. 


10.83 




N.R. 


8. 


N.R. 


9. 


N.R. 




Dickinson 




Rating 




27.50 




23.75 


1. 


22.60 


?.. 


21.00 


3. 


18.00 


4. 


16.43 


5. 


14.n0 




12.60 




12.60 




12.50 




12.00 


1. 


11.25 


2. 


N.R. 


3 


N.R. 


4 


N.R. 


5. 



Team 

Corbin 

Cumberland 

Middlesboro 

Hall 

Evarts 

Bell County __. 
Knox Central __ 
Hazel Green __- 

Team 

Hazard 


District 2 


W 

4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 
. 

w 

7 
6 
3 
3 
3 
1 
1 

1 

A 
w 

6 
4 
6 
4 
2 
2 
1 
1 


w 

9 
7 
3 
1 


W 

6 
4 
4 
2 
2 


L 


2 
2 
2 
4 
3 
3 
1 

L 


1 
1 
3 
4 
4 
4 
5 
2 

L 


1 
3 
3 
3 
3 
4 
6 
4 

L 


2 
4 
6 

7 

L 

1 
3 
4 
5 
6 


T 










T 


2 

1 
1 





T 











T 





1 
1 

T 








Dickinson 
Rating 

25.00 
18.00 
18.00 
17.00 
15.71 
12.60 
12.60 
N.E. 

Dickinson 
Rating 

27.50 
22.60 


Belfry 

Fleming-Neon „ 




18.00 
15.71 
15.00 






12.00 


Wheelwright — 
M. C. Napier — 




12.00 
10.00 


Leslie County __ 

Team 

St. Xavier 


CLASS AA 

REGION 1 


N.R. 

Dickinson 
Rating 

27.60 


Male 




23.75 


Flaget 




15.71 






14.00 


duPont Manual _ 




14.00 
12.00 






11.43 






10.00 


Team 

Valley 


REGION 2 
District 1 


Dickinson 
Rating 

27.50 


Butler 

Pleasure Ridge - 


.:::::::::::::_ 


20.00 
14.28 
11.88 






10.63 


Team 


District 2 


Dickinson 
Rating 

23.75 


Waggener 




17.86 
15.00 


Durrett 

Fern Creek 




12.86 
12.60 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



MT. STERLING — REGION III CLASS A CHAMPION ^ 




*'Oi*>f ^ ,i-^"' -^•^- -^'^ -.-^ .r« 



|# ^i/ 4h 4^-^^f 4\ if^ 4iV ^- 



J 




(Left to Rieht) Front Row: Jeff Gatewood, Milburn Kuh, J. T. Spencer, Jerry Ensor, David McFadden, Stan- 
ley Justice, Bobby Terry, John McReynolds, Charles Moreland. Second Row : Eddie Oldfield, Milward Hadden, 
John Horton, Bill Webb, Ray Harvey, David Ishmael, Frank King, Jr.. Joe Riley, Bill Canan, Paul Ross, Charl- 
es Hughes. Third Row : Mike Eads, James Ross, John Edmondson, Billy Earl Ishamel, Ray Kemplin, Johnny 
Ware, Robert Clay, Andy Morrison, Freddie Haas, Jerry Crump, Robert King. Fourth Row: Larry Willia 
Leroy Jones, Clell Keith, Jimmy Wilcox. 



Attention, Head Basketball Coaches! 

Adolph Rupp, our basketball coadh, in- 
vites all head basketball coaches in the senior 
high schools of Kentucky to be the guests 
of the University of Kentucky Athletics As- 
sociation the night of December 27, 1962, 
at the Dartmouth game. Each head coach of 
basketball will be allowed two tickets to be 
picked up tihe night of the game at the ticket 
window in front of the Coliseum by indenti- 
fying himself. Requests for these tickets 
must be received not later than December 
22 by Bernie A. Shively, Athletic Director. 
Bernie A. Shively 



New Sports Guides 

Three new editions of the official sports 
Guides published by the Division for Girls 
and Women's Sports of the AAHPER are 
now available. The 1962-64 Tennis-Badmin- 
ton, the 1962-64 Archery-Riding, and the 
1962-64 Bowling-Fencing-Golf Guides are 
the most recent editions in the popular Sum- 
mer Library of DGWS. 

The 1962-64 Tennis Badminton Guide (144 
pages) has USLTA rules of lawn tennis and 
the ABA laws of badminton in addition to 
the techniques of officiating each sport. 
Teaching tips about tennis are suggested in 



articles about handball-tennis, teaching de- 
vices, a test for the service, and a homemade 
tennis ball thrower. Promoting badminton, 
setting up a sports day, and playing a new 
doubles serve are explained in the badminton 
section. 

The 1962-64 Archery-Riding Guide (128 
pages) offers much archery tournament in- 
formation along with the official rules, stan- 
dards, and teaching articles. Application 
forms are included, with future tournament 
announcements. Riding rating information is 
included, giving rules for rating basic riding 
on two levels, requirements for appointing 
qualified judges, and a directory of qualified 
judges. 

The 1962-64 Bowling-Fencing-Golf Guide 
(128 pages) contains a wealth of information 
about the three sports in its articles, and re- 
ferences and visual aids lists. Tournament 
information is included in the bowling sec- 
tion, a useful glossary in the fencing section, 
and a golf professional's plea for a change 
in amateur status. 

Division for Girls and Women's Sports. 

Order copies from AAHPER, 1201— 16th 
St., N.W.; Washington 6, D. C; $1.00 each. 
Discounts: 2-9 copies (of one title), 10% ; 10 
or more copies, 20%. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



Page Fifteen 



PERRYVILLE — BLUEGRASS EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 



7S^5'3S'^55'«^30-40iso^'8n' 






(Left to Right) Front Row: Johnny Reynolds, Robbie Mayes, Morris Stewart, Robert Riley. Roy Milburn. Billy 
Cochran, Joe Bruce Rankin, Jay Reynolds. Second Row: Sonny Glasscock, Kenneth Carpenter, Jackie Godbey, 
Joe Hundley, Sammy Worley, Sonny Smith, Walter Foster, Robert Overstreet, Danny Wilkerson, Coach Jim 
Farley. 

PARK CITY— BARREN RIVER EIGHT-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Rieht) Front Row: Tony Brown, GUn Farrar, Mike Bell, Odell Wilson, Ellis Denison, Dan Dean, Gano 
Hampton, James Basil, David Wood, Blake Neville. Second Row: Leroy Parker, Dean Ewin^, Harvey Davis, Le- 
roy Ray, Lonnie Brewster, Harold Baldock, Bernard Lawrence, Darel Buckingham, Gary Gillon, Roger Boles, 
Sam Gray. Third Row: Dale Mitchell, Ed Farrar, Vernon McDaniels, Grey Ritter, John Young, Ronnie Wooten, 
Greg Bell, Bary Landrum, Eddie Green, Joe Gray. Fourth Row: John Woodward, Phil Lyons, Clift Brooks, Bill 
Bishop, John Blazewski, Ronnie Taylor, Roger Smith. Fifth Row: Coach Perry Brown, Coach Al Ellison, Coach 
Aaron Turner. 



U. of L. Service 

Dr. John Heldman, Jr., head of the H.P.E Jl. Depart- 
menlt at tihe University of Lomsville, writes that he 
has had numerous requests for certain aids used in 
physiical education, intramurals, and athletics from 
high schools, colleges and the United States Army. Dr. 
Heldman has sent to the K.H.S.A.A. office mimeo- 
graphed sheets listinig this material. It includes in- 
formatJon about weight training, dust elimination, cot- 
ton and wool equipment, weed killers, and field mark- 



ing material. Interested administrators or coaches may 
write to the K.H.S.A.A. office for a copy of the in- 
formation. 

New Coaches' Directory 

A 1962-63 directory of Kentucky high school coach- 
es has been prepared by Athletic Enterprises, 727 
Winter Avenue, Big Rapids, Michigan. The directory 
lists school athletic directors and coaches in the 
various sports, school colors, team nicknames, con^ 
fei-ence mearibership, and 1961-62 football and basket- 
ball won and lost records. The directoi-y sells for $3.00 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1962 



Season's 
Greetings 



^Ue KUu^deii, Qo4ii/p,a4Uf> 



\ W. E. KINGSLEY 

i 

{ 608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 2-8522 



Examining The Athlete 

For a number of years medical and dental ex- 
aminati'onis have been required as a prerequisite to 
athletic pai-ticipation in most places. They are usually 
necessai-y to qualify for insurance as well as for the 
protection of participants. 

Most of the youths examined will be foimd to be in 
good health. Defects thaJt are discovered can frequent- 
ly be corrected or alleviated. Those defects that can- 
not be corrected do not necessarily bar a youth from 
participation in all sports. 

The health examination (medical and dental) helps 
to guide the youth concerned into sports activities 
within his personal capabilities. Also, of course, it 
helps to eliminate the occasional youth who has a dis- 
ability that might be aggravated by athletic partici- 
pation. Medical and school personnel should work as 
a team in announcing such decisions. 

Physicians agree that a careful health history is 
essential for effective evaluation of the athlete. Such 
a history includes the record of immunizations, illness- 
es and injuries which the athlete has experienced, as 
well as any other data that may have health signifi- 
cance. These factors, w'hen coi-related with current 
observations and findings, provide a sound basis for 
judging the capacities of the athlete. 

The Committee on the Medical Aspects of Sports 



of the American Medical Association recommends that 
all students taking part in vigorous athletic activities 
have a health examination prior to participation each 
year. This examination should be designed to elicit the 
general state of health, to disclose any defects which 
might contraindicate participation, and to uncover any 
conditions that might predispose to injury. 

During a succeeding season or seasons, a limited 
reexamination is reconunended under the following 
conditions: (1) if the athlete has had an injury dur- 
ing the preceding season; (2) if the athlete has been 
out of school with illness other than minor upper 
respiratory or gastrointestinal upset during the pre- 
ceding term; (3) if an atlilete has had an operation 
aunng the preceding term. 

There are a nuimber of ways in which health ex- 
aminations of atlhletes can be administered. In some 
places, athletes are examined by their own family 
physician on an individual basis. Where a school or 
team physician is available, he may do the examining. 
In other places, the local medical society or health de- 
partment has established an accepted procedure. 

The most desirable plan is the one that best fits 
local conditions, including the school situation and 
medical and dental customs and practices. The A.M.A. 
Committee on the Medical Aspects of Sports rec- 
ommends that local school officials and medical and 
dental society representatives jointly work out mu- 
tually acceptable policies and procedures. 

— National Federation and A.MA. 




Superior 
ASKETBALL 

Equipment 




TROPHIES 

TOURNAMENT AND INDIVIDUAL 
TROPHIES IN COMPLETE PRICE RANGE 
—IN STOCK— FOR AT-ONCE SHIPMENT 

SEE YOUR SUTCLIFFE CATALOGUE 

FOR COMPLETE ASSORTMENT 

FOR YOUR SELECTION 



Tournament 
Uasketballs 

RSS-RAWLINGS "SEAM SEALED" 
PLY FUSED BASKETBALL HAS 
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Each - $23.95 




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Official for Any Tournament. Each .... $23.95 

For Fast Service For In-Stock Merchandise 
Send Your Order To 



THE SUTCLIFFE COMPANY 



INCORPORATED 



275 SOUTH FOURTH ST. 



LOUISVILLE I. KENTUCKY 



Basketball Season Is Here 

In Stock tor Immediate Delivery 
OUR NEW NO. AFR BASKETBALL 




Here's our finest PANEL-LOCK basketball. 
Exclusive PANEL-LOCK design eliminates' 
panel lifting and peeling — assures far super- 1 
ior shot control . . . uniform dribble . . . uni- 
form backboard rebound. Finest quality deep 
pebbled grain cowhide leather. Wider chan- < 
nel seams for better finger tip control. This , 
ball bears the signature of Coach Adolph 
Rupp of the University of Kentucky and is* 
used by the Kentucky Wildcats Basketball i 
Team. Trv one. 



THE PRICE IS 

$22.95 



Now that the opening of basketball season is at hand this would be an ideal time to place your or- 
der for a set of good basketball uniforms and warmup clothing. We will gladly send samples or our rep- 
resentative will call to see you without obligation. Write us or phone us, and why not do it at once? 

By the way — how's your stock on score books, sweat socks, practice pants, practice jerseys, first- 
aid supplies and other items necessary to start your basketball season? 



REMEMBER OUR MOTTO: "We Ship the Day You Buy." 



Each and every order for any type of merchandise, whether special made or out of stock, gets the 
personal attention of every person in our store. 

If you would like to see our salesman for either basketball or football supplies, call us at CHapel 
7-1941 nr CHapel 7-1942. 

ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, ED HENDLEY or C. A. BYRN, JR. are always ready to assist you 
in every way possible. 



If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE, contact HUNT'S 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




Hiqh School AthMe 



Class AA State Champion Danville 








(Left to right) Front Row: Terry Griffin, Brent Arnold, Henry Dailey, Alex Jackson, Sammy 
Burke, Johnny Jackson, Jimmy Critchfield, Billy Critchfield, Roger Prall, David Taylor, Doug 
Terry. Second Row: Jerry Abbott, William Selby, Jackie Smith, Gary Compton, Larry Bowling, 
Larry Smallwood, Wayne Thompson, Jimmy Porter, Billy Rowzee, John Sanders, Bill Payne. 
Third Row: Alan Bums, Joe Horky, Joe Van Hutchinson, Clifford Lancaster, Craig Pohlman, 
Russ Shearer, Frank Tanner, Billy Russell, Donald Smith, Larry Reardon, Dickie Young. Four- 
th Row: Harold Carson, Joe Burke, Jack Leathers, Paul Southwood, Ferrill Bailey, Charlie Mc- 
Anly, Mike Wilder, Freddie Durham. 



Danville 31 — Bryan Station 13 

Danville 32 — Owensboro 13 

Danville 18 — Versailles 

Danville 32 — Henry Clay 7 

Danville 7 — ^Madison 7 

Danville 22 — Owensboro 
Danville 13 — Corbin 6 



Danville 47— Clark County 21 
Danville 6 — Corbin 19 
Danville — Shelbyville 6 
Danville 45 — Somerset 21 
Danville 21— Lafayette 
12 



OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
JANUARY - 13B3 




Conference Standings 

Barren River Eight-Man Conference 



Mid-Kentucky Conference 



Park City 

Cavema 

Hiseville 

Temple Hill 

Gamaliel 

Austin-Tracy 



Bluegrass Eight-Man Conference 

PeiTyville 7 10 

Paint Lick 6 11 

Camp Dick Robinson 4 3 1 

Mt. Vernon 2 6 

Burg-in 8 



Big Eight Conference 



Owensboro 

Stiu'gis 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Madisonville 

Owensboro Catholic 

Morganfield 



Central Kentucky Conference 



Shelbyville 

Danville 

Versailles 

Henry Clay 

Anderson 

Lancaster 

Irvine 

Georgetown 

Harrodsburg 



DIVISION I 

7 
3 
6 
2 
4 
3 
2 
2 
1 

DIVISION II 



Mt. Sterling 5 

Somerset 4 

Madison 4 

Jessamine County 6 

Paris 5 
Millersburg Military Inst. 2 

Stanford 2 

Frankfort 3 

Carlisle 



25.00 
23.50 
22.00 
18.00 
15.00 
14.28 
12.85 
12.50 
11.25 



21.67 
21.00 
19.64 
19.44 
18.57 
14.00 
14.00 
13.75 
10.00 



Cumberland Valley Conference 



Cumberland 

East Main 

Loyall 

Wallins 

Evarts 

Hall 



Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 



Hazard 

Whitesburg 

Belfry 

Elkhom City 

Fleming Neon 

Jenkins 

Pikeville 

Wheelwright 

Prestonsburg 

Napier 



Old Ky. Home 
Elizabethtown 
Fort Knox 
St. Joseph 
Bardstown 
Lebanon 
Springfield 
Shephierdsville 



McKell 

Catlettsburg 

Russell 

Raceland 

Louisa 

Wurtland 

Boyd County 



Campbellsville 
LaRue County 
Tompkinsville 
Greensburg 



5 1 
3 1 

2 2 

3 2 
3 2 
2 3 
3 
4 


26.25 

26.25 

1 20.50 

20.00 

1 19.58 
16.00 
10.00 
10.00 


Athletic 


Conference 


6 
5 1 
4 2 
2 4 
2 4 
1 5 
1 5 











athletic Conference 


1 

1 1 


1 


1 



1 





Southeastern Kentucky Conference 











6 


1 





25.00 


4 


1 





22.50 


5 


3 





18.75 


4 


2 





17.50 


3 


3 


1 


16.43 


3 


5 





15.00 


2 


3 


1 


14.17 


2 


3 


1 


14.17 


1 


6 


1 


11.88 





4 





10.00 



Corbin* 

Middlesboro 

Harlan 

Williamsburg 

London 

Pineville 

Knox Central 

Bell County 

Barbourville 

Lynn Camp 

Hazel Green 



*Did not play enougrh to qualify for title 

Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Tilghman 

HopkinsviUe 

Caldwell County 

Murray 

Bowling Green 

Fulton 

Trigg County 

Franklin^Simpson 

RussellvOle 

Crittenden County 

Christian County 

Providence 

Mayfield 

Warren County 



Highlands 

Holmes 

Newport 

Boone County 

Campbell County 

Beechwood 

Dixie Heights 

Bellevue 

Ludlow 

Dayton 

Lloyd 



30.00 



4 








27.50 


8 


1 





21.25 


6 


2 





20.00 


6 


2 





20.00 


6 


3 





19.375 


3 


1 





18.75 


3 


5 


1 


15.625 


3 


3 





15.00 


3 


6 





13.75 


1 


3 


1 


13.00 


1 


3 


1 


13.00 


1 


5 


1 


12.142 


1 


6 





11.428 





5 





10.00 


ithl 


etic 


Conference 


7 








30.00 


4 


1 





25.00 


4 


3 





20.00 


4 


3 





19.28 


5 


3 


1 


18.33 


2 


1 


1 


16.25 


3 


4 


1 


16.25 


4 


5 





14.44 


1 


3 


1 


14.00 


2 


6 





12.50 





7 





10.00 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXV— NO. 6 



JANUARY, 1963 



1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions-Installment 2 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside nor modify 
any mle. They are interpretations of some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

17. Play: At the beginning of the second half, 
A6 is on the court when the ocfficial is ready to toss 
the ball for the center jump. Scorer discovers: (a) 
before; oir (b) after the baill is tossed that A6 has not 
reported to him. 

Ruling: In (a), ^the scorer should report the in- 
fraction to the official immediately and before the 
ball is tossed. A6 is charged with a technical foul and 
a free throw is aiwarded to team B. Team B will throw 
in from opposite centea- after free throw, whether 
or not suooessiful. In (b), the infraction should be ig- 
nored amd no penalty is assessed. 

18. Play: Bl touches the ball during a field goal 
try by Al while the ball is on or directly above the 
ring. 

Ruling: Al is awarded two points and team B is 
permitted a throw-in from the end of the coiirt at 
which the in'terference occurred and from any point 
outside end line, the same as if a goad had been scored. 
The clock is not stopped unless some unusual circum- 
stance warrants the official stopping it. 

19. Play: Al, in his back court, advances baU by 
dribble. Bl guards him and forces Al to end dribble. 
Bl then attempts to secuire a held hall. Al, to evade 
his guard, pivots, throws the ball against B's back- 
board, recovers it, and daibbles again. 

Ruling: Violation. Al has double-dribbled. He 
has dribbled a second time without losing coirttrol of 
the bail. Thi-owinig the ball against an opponent's 
backboard is not considered a try. 

20. Play: While a free thi-ow by Al is in flight, 
a peirsonal foul is committed by A2 or Bl. After the 
foul and befoire the ball touches the ring or backboard 
or before the free throw ends, B2 breaks the vertical 
plane of the lane boundai-y with his foot. 

Ruling: Both infi-aotions are penalized. The viola- 
tion by B2 is ignored if the free throw is successful. 
If the free throw is not successful, Al is given a sub- 
stitute throw. After the violation has been penalized, 
a free throw (or throws) is awarded for the personal 
foul. 

21. Play: While a try for field goal by Al is in 
flight, Al chairges into Bl. B2 then commits a basket 
interference violation. 

Ruling: Both the violation and personal foul 
are penalized. Team A is awarded two points for the 
basket interfereruee by B amid -then Bl is awarded a 
free throw (or throws) for the charging foul by Al. 

22. Play: While a free throw by Al is in flight: 
(a) A2 pushes B2 and then A3 steps into the free 
throw lane too soon; or (b) A3 steps into the free 
throw lane too soon and then A2 pushes B2. 

Ruling: In (a) both the personal fold by A2 and 
the violation by A3 are penalized. The violation by 
A3 causes the bail to become dead immediately and, 
therefore, the free throw cannot score a point. The 
foul by A2 is ithen penalized and, because this is a 
false double foul situation, after the attempt or at- 



tempts by B2, play is i-esumed by a jump at center. 
In (b), the ball becomes dead when A3 violates and, 
therafoa-e, the pushing of B2 by A2 is ignored unless 
it was flagrant or unsportsmanhke. 

23. Play: Al passes the ball nearly parallel with 
the sideline and it goes out of bounds into the 
bleachers several feet beyond the spot where it crossed 
the plane of the sideline. 

Ruling: Throw-in for B closest to the spot where 
the ball touched something out of bounds. 

24. Play: An offensive man is facing the defen- 
sive man. Can the deifensive man get very close to him 
in this position? 

Ruling; Yes, as long as the defensive man does 
not cause contact. 

25. Play: After ball is tossed for jump but be- 
fore a legal tap, A2 intentionally pushes B2. 

Ruling: Even though clock has not started, it 
is a personal foul. Two free throws are awarded in 
this isituation because the foul was intentional. 

26. Play: Scorers fail to record two points 
awarded to team A during the first quarter as a result 
of basket interference by B2. Omission is discovered 
during the half-time intermission. 

Ruling: Score should be corrected. This error is 
not due to the inadvei-tent setting aside of a rule, but 
it is due to a mistake in record keeping. When there 
is a discrepancy in the score and an official is positive 
he knows what the mistake is, he can correct it. 

27. Play: Does a defensive player who is guard- 
ing the pivot post man have to guard him any dif- 
ferently when he does not have the ball than when he 
has the ball? 

Ruling: No. The defensive player may guard the 
pivot mian as closely as he desires, short of contact. 
If the post man crouches or bends and the defensive 
man straddles his legs and contact results when the 
defensive man straightens up, a foul would be charged 
to the guard or defensive man. 

28. Play: The offensive -man is standing still. 
IVLay a defensive man move up close behind him, re- 
gardless of where the offensive man is standing on 
the floor? 

Ruling: Yes. The defensive man may be as close 
as he desires to the offensive man — again, anything 
short of contact, unless the offensive man is along 
the lane during a free throw. Any member of the 
team with the ball (offensive man) can expect to be 
closely guarded. The defensive man has the respon- 
sibility of preventing ithe offensive man from securing 
the ball and, in most situations, to satisfactorily dis- 
charge this responsibility it requires that he play the 
offensive man closely. Guarding ajn. offensive player 
is not a screening situation and the screening principles 
do not apply. 

29. Play: A2, in his front court (in attempting 
to get the ball out of a congested area), bats a center 
jump tap into his back court, where A5 secures pos- 
session. 

(Continued on Page Thirteen) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



JANUARY, 1963 VOL. XXV— NO. 6 

Pablished monthly, except June and Jnly, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexingrton, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexin^on, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown 

Vice-President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan 

Directors — Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman 
Gish (1962-63), Greenville; Preston Holland (1961-65), Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-65), Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1962- 
66), Louisville; Oran C. Teater (1960-64), Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



Jiotn the Commcssconei s (Jjffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1962 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



"Approved" and "Certified" Officials 

A larg-e number of K. H. S. A. A. regiatei-ed of- 
ficials qualified for the advanced rating of "Approv- 
ed" and "Certified" as a result of tlie National Federa- 
tion basketball examination which was given in Ken- 
tucky on December 3, 1962. The "Approved" raiting 
does not carry forward from year to year, but -must 
be earned each year. After an official has received 
the "Certified" rating, he keeps this rating by (Jinic 
attendance. Only officials receivirg these higher rat- 
ings are eligible to work in the regional tournaments. 
Only "Certfiied" officials who are residents of Ken- 
tucky are eligible to work in the State Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualified for advanced 
ratings during the current season are as follows: 

Certified Officials 



Alexander, Rex 
Allen, Lowry R. 
Allen, Nelson R. 
Almond, Alvin 
Arnold, Kermeibh 
Baird, Bill 
Baker, James E. 
Ballard, Jack H. 
Baughn, E. L. 
Bell, Clarence T. 
Bennett, Bert 
Blackburn, Viley O. 
Boyles, Paul E. 
Bradshaw, Bill 
Bridges, Bennie 
Brizendine, Vic 
Brovm, E. C. 
Brown, James W. 
Brown, John W. "Scoop" 
Bruner, Jack C. 
Buis, Nathaniel A. 
Canter, John 
Casteel, Ralph M. 
Chabtin, Charles 
Coleman, L. J. "Duke" 
Conley, George 
Cooper, Wan^n 
Craft, Bill 



Crosthwaite, John S., 
CuiTimins, Al 
Davis, Bunny 
Davis, Harold T. 
DiMuzio, Robert 
Dotson, John B. 
Drake, Richard R. 
Driskell, Earl, Jr. 
Duerson, Wm. R. 
Duncan, Earl 
Durkin, Jack 
Edelen, Bon R. 
Elrod, Wm. Turner 
Ferrell, Doctor T. 
Flynn, Bobby 
Fositer, William R. 
Fritz, Sherman 
Fuller, John R., Jr. 
Gardner, Howard E. 
Gettler, John F. 
Gilbert, Gerald L. 
Goley, James E. 
Green, Walt 
Grisham, Jesse R. 
Gustafson, Al, Jr. 
Hagan, Joe 
Harrell, Bill D. 
Haynes, John 



Jr. 



Heldman, John, Jr. 
Hewitt, R. T. 
Hill, Earl P. 
Hodge, Fred 
Hofstetter, Joe 
Hook, B. B., Jr. 
Huter, Jim 
Hyatt, Bob 
Inman, Briscoe 
Irwin, Charles R. 
Jenkins, James 
Jenkins, Kean 
Johnson, M. Bernard 
Johnson, Walter 
KLmmel, Jerry 
King, Bob 
King, Jim 
King-, P. J. 
Knight, Bill 
Kremer, Joe 
Lance, Walter 
Long, Bill 

Longenecker, David M. 
Looney, Dick 
Lowe, Gene T. 
Lucas, Gene 
Lytic, Wm. Price 
McClure, W. S. 
McGehee, G. K. 
McLeod, Robert N. 
McPike, Ray S., Jr. 
Mahan, Carle 
Maines, George 
May, E. B., Jr. 
Mays, Ralph J. 
Meade, Foster, 
Metcalf, Earl L. 
Meyer, Bud 
Miller, Bob 
Miller, Rex J. 
Millei-, Roy L. 
Moore, Robert 
Moore, Roy 
Mudd, Ed 
Nau, Bill 
Neal, Gene 
Newton, C. M. 
Nixon, James W. 
Nord, Ed 
Omer, Billy 
Padgett, R. K. 
Parker, Billy E. 



"Sid" 



Paul Wright 
Peay, Curtis 
Pergrem, Bernard 
Phelps, Ralph, "Rudy" 
Powell, Logan 
Pursiful, Cleophus 
Reed, Charles R. 
Reed, Gordon 
Reinihardt, Myron 
Ricketts, C. 0. 
Riggs, William T. 
Ribter, Goebel 
Rollei-, Otis 
Rothfuss, Dick 
Rouse, Clyde L. 
Rubaits, Leland G. 
Russell, Allen W. 
St. Clair, Robert. L., Jr. 
Sanders, Mel 
Schlieh, Paul E. 
Selvy, Curt 
Settle, Evan E., Jr. 
Settle, Roy G. 
Shaw, Earl 
Small, Bill 
Smith, Edgar J. 
Sosh, LaRue 
Spencer, Irvin E. 
StanfUl, Robert 
Sbeenken, William R. 
Stephenson, Han-y S. 
Sullivan, Don C. 
Taylor, Ed 
Taylor, Robert S. 
Thompson, Jack 
Thompson, Ralph 
Tucker, Neal R. 
Varble, William 
Vettiner, Charlie 
Weaver, Ray 
Wells, Milford 
Wesche, James A. 
White, David B. 
Williams, Roger 
Williams, Tom M. 
Winchester, Roy L. 
Winfrey, Shelby 
Wise, Billy V. 
Wise, Jack 
Woods, Gene 
Wm-tz, Emil 
Zachem, Vincent 



Akins, Charlie 
Baker, Robert M., Jr, 
Brown, Eddie W. 
Bruner, John Lee, Jr, 
Chandler, Jim T. 
Combs, Keith A. 
Combs, Wm. E. 
Cravirford, Tom 
Dame, L. J. 
Davenport, Robert B. 
Elliott, Carroll L. 
Prazer, Tom Roe 
Gabbard, John B. 
Gour, Robert 
Hammons, Norman 
Harville, Robert 
Johnson, James M. 
Jordan, Art 
Kensler, Orville A. 
King, Dan 



Approved Officials 

McAnelly, David F. 
McCoy, Hayse 
McLin, Bruce 
Moore, James E. 
Morse, Richaixl K. 
Murphy, Leo T., Jr. 
Neail, James 
Perry, James E. 
Points, Charles 
Prather, Wilbur E. 
Rawlings, Harold 
Reschar, John V. 
Rexi-oat, Jen'y L. 
Stiff, Maurice E. 
Stines, Ray A. 
Stith, Houston 
Strain, Richard P. 
Tarlton, Thomas O. 
Wirtz, Leonard 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



Page Three 



1962-63 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

School Address Tel No. Principal Basketball Coach 







REGION 1 




D. 1 Carlisle Counity 


R. 3, Bardwell 


MA 8-5411 


0. J. Mitchell 


Tom Adkins 


Fulton 


Fulton 


697 


J. M. Martin 


Chester Caddas 


Fulton County 


Hickman 


3168 


Tom Johnson 


John West 


Hickman County 


Clinton 


OL 3-5461 


James H. Phillips 


James Walker 


Rivei-view 


Hickman 


2070 


A. W. Greene 


Robert Danner 


D. 2 Ballard Memorial 


R. 1, Barlow 


665-5151 


Robert G. Fiser 


Borny Miller 


Heath 


W. Paducah 




Don Stephenson 


Larry Powell 


Lincoln 


Paducah 


443-4884 


E. W. Whiteside 


John C. McVoy 


Lone Oak 


Paducah 


443-1211 


John Robinson 


Gleen Dextei' 


Paducah Tilghman 


Paducah 


443-6296 


Bradford D. Mutchler 


Otis Dinning 


Reidland 


R. 8, Paducah 


898-2441 


Richard L. Winebarger 


Irvin Johnston 


St. John 


R. 5, Paducah 


443-1867 


Sr. Mary Eulogius, RSM 


Rev. Richard Clements 


St. Mary's Acad. 


Paducah 


443-2677 


Sr. Thekla, SCN 


Jack McKinney 


D. 3 Cuba 


R. 1, Mayfield 


EV 2-2160 


Joe McPhereon 


Rex Smith 


Dunbar 


Mayfield 


CH 7-4520 


F. I. Stiger 


A. Dawson 


Fancy Farm 


Fancy Farm 


623-3181 


Sr. Celine Maria 


Joe Mikez 


Parmington 


Farmington 


345-2171 


C. W. Jones 


Larry Colley 


Lowes 


Lowes 


674-5333 


W. W. Chumbler 


Gene Mason 


Mayfield 


Mayfield 


CH 7-4461 


Barkley Jones 


Jack Story 


Sedalia 


Sedalia 


328-3241 


James A. Pickard 


Ken Wray 


Symsonia 


Symsonia 


851-3231 


Cecil Reid 


Carson Colman 


Wingo 


Wingo 


376-3271 


Howard V. Reid 


Warren Fiser 


D. 4 Benton 


Benton 


527-2511 


J. Delton Dodds 


Billy Joe Farris 


Calloway County 


Murray 


PL 3-5479 


William B. Miller 


Howard Crittenden 


Douglass 


MuiTay 


PL 3-3612 


L. P. Miller 


J. L. Prewitt 


Murray College 


Murray 


PL 3-2310 


Wilson Gantt 


Garrett Beshear 


Murray 


Murray 


753-5202 


Eli Alexander 


Larry Bale 


North Marshall 


Calvert City 


395-4400 


Robert Goheen 


Charlie Lampley 


South Marshall 


R. 1, Benton 


527-2891 


Reed Conder 


William Cothran 






REGION 2 




D. 5 Caldwell County 


Princeton 


365-2635 


William F. Brown 


George B. Perry 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


965-4226 


Ercel Little 


L. B. Gaston 


DotB'on 


Princeton 


EM 5-2155 


B. S. Miller 


J. W. Withi-ow 


Fredonia 


Fredonia 


4231 


Odell Walker 


Raybome Pickering 


Livingston Central 


Buma 


988-3263 


Kenneth T. Hardin 


G. H. Whitecotton 


Lyon County 


Kuittawa 


5201 


John E. Floyd 


Frank E. Wright 


D. 6 Earlington 


Earlington 


DU 3-5220 


Robert B. Fox 


Robert B. Fox 


J. W. Million 


Earlingiton 




Lester Mimms 


Lester Mimms 


Madisonyille 


Madisonville 


TA 1-2824 


Charles Boozer 


C. G. SheiTell 


Rosenwald 


Madisonville 


TA 1-5044 


Mrs. Pearl M. Arnett 


Caldwell Smith 


South Hopkins 


Nortonville 


OR 6-3443 


David Siria 


Jim Mitchell 


West Hopkins 


Nebo 


249-3151 


A. 0. Richards 


Lyle Dunbar 


D. 7 Attucks 


Hopkinsville 


885-8278 


Frank B. Simpson 


William M. Falls, Sr. 


Christian County 


Hopkinsville 


TU 6-1084 


I. Fred Porter 


John Rendek 


Dawson Springs 


Dawson Springs 


SW 7-3811 


R. A. Belt 


Gerald Gamble 


Hopkin'sville 


Hopkinsville 


TU 6-2433 


Chester C. Redmon 


W. B. Sydnor 


Trigg County 


Cadiz 


522-6653 


Arthm- Wallace 


Gerald Bu'-nett 


D. 8 Clifty 


Olifity 


277-3181 


0. P. Hurt 


Howard Goi-rell 


Ft. Campbell 


Ft. Campbell 


2645 


Bill R. Perry 


Tom Morgan 


Guithrie 


Guthrie 


483-2355 


Waldo L. Wolfe 


Wm. Longhurst, Jr. 


Todd County 


Elkton 


265-2407 


Robert N. Bush 


Harold Ross 


Todd County Tmg. 


Elkton 


265-2566 


William T. Gilbert 


Jimmy D. Harris 






REGION 3 




D. 9 Clay 


Clay 


NO 4-2227 


Ivan L. Russell 


David Boetler Omer 


Dixon 


Dixon 


ME 9-9080 


P. D. Fanoher 


Marion W. Morris 


Providence 


Providence 


MO 7-2411 


George B. Wooton 


Mon-is Coffman 


Sebree 


Sebree 


TE 5-7891 


James M. Lynch 


Bob Bradley 


Slaughters 


Slaughters 


884-3315 


Lloyd Sharp 


Bob Chaney 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



School 



Address 



Tel No. 



Principal 



Basketball Coach 



D. 10 Douglass 


Hendei'son 


VA 6-4954 


H. B. Kirkwood 


George K. McGill 


Dunbar 


Morganfield 


476 


Charles N. Crutcher 


John A. Howard 


Henderson 


Henderson 


VA 6-9568 


W. B. Posey 


Kenneth Geralds 


Henderson County 


Henderson 


826-9056 


J. W. Duncan 


Nonnan O'Nan 


Holy Name 


Henderson 


VA 7-9297 


Sr. Sai-a Ann 


J. K. Lindenberg 


Morganfield 


Morganfield 


291 


Thomas Brantley 


Yanicey Watkins 


St. Agnes 


Uniontown 


69 


Rev. R. E. Hill 


Rev. Anthony Ziegler 


St. Vincent Acad. 


St. Vincent 


WA 2611 


Sr. Raymunda, SCN 


Robeat Velten 


Stiu-gis 


Sturgis 


4008 


H'Earl Evans 


H. D. Holt, Jr. 


D. 11 Bremen 


Bremen 


525-3411 


Paul Phillips 


Bob Rickai-d 


Calhoun 


Calhoun 


BR 3-3264 


L. D. Knight 


Don Parson 


Livennore 


Livermore 


8-2522 


David Boy ken 


Frank S. Cox 


Sacramento 


Sacramento 


736-2343 


A. G. Crume 


BiU Cariyle 


D. 12 Daviess County 


Owensboro 


MU 4-5285 


W. P. Wheeler 


Woodrow Crum 


Owensboro 


Owensboro 


MU 3-1016 


Joe 0. Brown 


Robert Watson 


Owensboro Catholic 


Owensboro 


MU 3-9614 


Sr. Helen Constance 


Willis Combest 


St. Mary-of-the- 










Woods 


Whitesville 


CE 3-4196 


Sr. Albert Mary 


David H. Warren 






REGION 4 




D. 13 Breckinridge Co. 


Hardinsbxu-g 


756-5184 


R. F. Peters 


Donald Morris 


Flaherty 


R. 3, Vine Grove 


828-3885 


H. W. Hunt 


Wally E. Johnson 


Frederick Fraize 


Cloverport 


788-3388 


V. M. Vibbei-t 


Tho. E. Belcher 


Hancock Co. 


R. 1, Lewisport 


WA 7-2531 


Forrest Williamson, Jr. 


Denzel Mefford 


Irvington 


Ii'vington 


547-2181 


W. 0. Jackson 


Norman Dillon 


Meade County 


Brandenburg 


422-4665 


Stuart Pepper 


Bill Case 


D. 14 BuUer County 


Morgantown 


LA 6-3062 


W. Foyest West 


W. 0. Warren, Jr. 


Caneyville 


Caneyville 


879-4211 


Ramon Majors 


Woody Neel 


Clarkson 


Clarkson 


242-3061 


James M. Wood 


Bowman Davenport 


Edmonson County 


Brownsville 


597-3960 


John M. Lane 


Donald Webb 


Grayson Co. Cath. 


Leitchfield 


242-3231 


Sr. Marie Kathleen 


Fr. Gerald Griffith 


LeitchJield 


Leitchfield 


259-4175 


John H. Taylor 


Jimmy A. Elmore 


D. 15 Beaver Dam 


Beaver Dam 


274-4478 


J. W. Park 


James Guess 


Centertown 


Centertown 


RE 2-4213 


Bryan Taylor 


Jack Maddox 


Fordsville 


Fordsville 


276-3601 


Noble H. Midkiff 


Parvin Bishop 


Hartford 


Hartford 


CY 8-3713 


Charles S. Combs 


Charles S. Combs 


Horse Branch 


Horse Branch 


274-4662 


W. M. Arnold 


Ernest D. Powell 


D. 16 Central City 


Central City 


9 


Delmas Gish 


Jackie Day 


Drakosboro Com. 


Drakesboro 


476-2210 


William Traylor 


Norman Pritchett 


Drakesboro Con. 


Drakesboro 


GR 6-2630 


W. J. Wilcutt 


James P. HUI 


Graham 


Graham 


2042 


Cecil Calvert 


Ken Arbuckle 


GreenvOle 


Greenville 


212 


Ernest Atkins 


W. D. Snodgi-ass 


Hughes Kirk 


Beechmont 


GR 6-2207 


Charles Fades 


Wayne Ewing 


Muhlenberg Central 


Powderly 


146 


Lyle Baugh 


Bob Daniels 






REGION 5 




D. 17 Alvaton 


Alvaton 


843-8067 


Arthur M. Reynolds 


Jim Walker 


Bowling Green 


Bowling Green 


842-1695 


Raymond Hei-ndon 


El Donaldson 


Bristow 


R. 1, Bowling Gr 


n. VI 2-1960 


Kenneth Harvey 


Jay Atkerson 


College 


Bowling Green 


2-0341 


James Cai-penter 


Al Almond 


Franklin-Simpson 


Franklin 


6-4763 


Ronald W. Clark 


John Price 


High Sb-eet 


Bowling Green 


2-1667 


Dr. E. T. Buford 


F. 0. Moxley 


Lincoln 


Franklin 


JU 6-3342 


W. H. Stoi-y 


William Griffith 


Noi-th Warren 


Smith Grove 


563-2041 


Denval P. Barriger 


Bob Bun-es 


Richardsvil'le 


Ridhardsville 


VI 2-3504 


G«orge Coker, Jr. 


John M. Lane, Jr. 


St. Joseph 


Bowling Green 


842-9758 


Sr. Alice Louise 


Richard M. Abell 


Warren County 


Bowling Green 


2-7302 


Cl&udius H. Harris 


Jess Kimbrough 


D. 18 Adairvffle 


Adaii-ville 


JE 9-7711 


Jesse L. Richards 


Gordon Pogue 


Auburn 


Auburn 


LI 2-4181 


Jim Young 


Jim Richards 


Chandler's Chapel 


R. 2, Aubum 


LI 2-6427 


Morris Shelton 


Thomas D. Garrett, Jr. 


Lewisburg 


Lewisburg 


SK 5-6191 


J. M. Vance 


Bob BirdwhisteU 


Olmstead 


Olmstead 


RE 4-4621 


W. N. Alexander 


Earle Shelton 


Russellville 


Russellville 


PA 6-6434 


R. D. Reynolds 


Howard Owens 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



Page Five 



School 



Address 



Tel No. 



Principal 



Basketball Coach 



D. 19 AUien County 


Seottsville 


237-3841 


T. C. Simmons 


Jim Bazzell 


Austin Tracy 


Lucas 


434-8911 


Kenneth B. Sidwell 


Charles Day 


Bunche 


Glasgow 


651-3988 


L. J. Twyman 


Frank Terrell 


Glasg-ow 


Glasgow 


651-2256 


Edwin J. Mayes 


Richard Parsons 


Hiseville 


Hiseville 


453-2611 


F. P. Newberry 


Gene Johnson 


Park City 


Park City 


749-2665 


W. L. Gardner 


Albert Ellison 


Seottsville 


Seottsville 


237-3751 


Bruce Stewart 


Ernest C. Neil II 


Temple Hill 


R. 4, Glasgow 


427-2611 


David Montgomery 


Roy Withrow 


D. 20 Clinton ComDty 


Albany 


387-2891 


Perry C. Hay 


Lindle Castle 


Cirnibei-l-and County 


Burkesville 


864-3451 


Leon King 


Larry McDonald 


Gamaliel 


Gamaliel 


457-2341 


Edwin Steen 


Tommy Downing 


Metcalfe County 


Edmonton 


2-2131 


Garland Creech 


Cortez Butler 


Tompkinsville 


Tompkinsville 


487-6217 


Randall Grider 


John C. Marrs 






REGION 6 




D. 21 Adair County 


Columbia 


384-2751 


Brooks Coomer 


John Burr 


Campbellsville 


Campbellsville 


465-5091 


Paul Coop 


Paul Coop 


Durham 


Canipbelteville 


465-5121 


M. J. Strong 


H. L. Steele 


Greensburg 


Greensburg 


932-5231 


E. E. Tate 


Carl Deaton 


Lebanon 


Lebanon 


692-3441 


Charles F. Martin 


Hubert Edwards 


St. Augustine 


Lebanon 


692-2053 


Sr. M. Anton 


Rev. J. L. Schlich 


St. Charles 


R. 2, Lebanon 


692-4578 


Sr. Jean Mark 


Tom Clark 


St. Francis 


Loretto 


865-2731 


Sr. Mary Carl, OSU 


Sam B. Thomas 


Taylor County 


Campbellsville 


465-4431 


J. G. McAnelly 


Bill B. Smith 


D. 22 Cavema 


Horse Cave 


PR 3-7951 


Wilbur Smith 


Ralph Dorsey 


Cub Run 


Cub Run 


524-2925 


James E. Redden 


Kenneth Metcalfe 


LaRue County 


Hodgenville 


358-3195 


Everett G. Sanders 


Corky Cox 


Memorial 


Hardyville 


528-2271 


Glen 0. Barrett 


Reathel Goff 


Munfordville 


Munfordville 


524-4651 


H. D. Puekett 


Ray Hammers 


D. 23 East Hardin 


Glendale 


854-2300 


Damon Ray 


Edwin Goodman 


Elizabethtown 


Elizabethtown 


765-5237 


Paul E. Kei-rick 


Charles Rawlings 


Elizabethtown Cath. 


Elizabethtown 




Sr. Mary Janice 


Wm. H. McLane 


Fort Knox 


FoJit Knox 


4-7019 


S. M. Matarazzo 


Bob BuiTow 


North Hardin 


Vine Grove 


2210 


James T. Alton 


Ron Chumbley 


West Hardin 


Stephensburg 


862-1924 


Kenneth Riddle 


Albert McLane 


D. 24 Bardstown 


Bardstown 


348-5913 


Vincent Zachem 


Garni s Mai-tin 


Bloomfield 


Bloomfield 


AL 2-2311 


T. T. Etheredge 


Ernest Ruby 


Fredericktown 


R. 2, Springfield 284-5417 


Sr. Charles Asa 


Robei't Hamilton 


Mackville 


Mackville 


2771 


Robert Drury 


Charles Hume 


Old Ky. Home 


Bardstown 


348-8473 


T. G. Florence 


Donald Dobbs 


St. Catherine 


New Haven 




Sr. Lennora 


Craym.r Slone 


St. Joseph 


Bardstown 


348-3856 


Br. Conrad, CFX 


C'yde ii. Smith 


Springfield 


Springfield 


336-3718 


Robert L. Robertson 


WTiJiam Yankey 


Willisburg 


Willisburg 


2217 


Z. T. Lesiter 


Ralph McFarland 






REGION 7 




D. 25 Ahrens 


Louisville 


JU 4-5435 


Alfred H. Meyer 


H. C. Watts 


Central 


Louisville 


JU 4-8443 


Abwood S. Wilson 


Kenneth Anthony 


Flagelt 


Louisville 


SP 8-9000 


Bro. Hilaire, CFX 


James Monis 


St. Xavier 


Louisville 


ME 6-2525 


Bro. Edward Daniel, 


DFXJoseph Reibel 


Shawnee 


Louisville 


774-2353 


Robert B. Clem 


John C. Ai-mstrong 


D. 26 Atherton 


Louisville 


459-3610 


Russell Garth 


Herky Rupp 


DeSales 


Louisville 


EM 8-6519 


Rev. J. J. Cattelona 


John Haury 


duPont Manual 


Louisville 


ME 7-1477 


A. J. Ries 


James CasiUo 


Male 


Louisville 


582-2613 


Foster J. Sanders 


Gene Rhodes 


Presentation Acad. 


Louisville 


JU 3-5935 


Sr. Thomas Mary 




D. 27 Bishop David Mem. 


Louisville 


447-4363 


Rev. Clarenice J. Swartz Leo Tierney 


Butler 


Louisville 


EM 3-2628 


H. L. Hatfield 


Andrew Diersing 


Fairdale 


Louisville 


EM 6-1468 


Harry K. Hardlin 


Forest Able 


Pleasure Ridge Pk. 


Pleasure Ridge 


Pk. 921-9230 


John H. Pollock 


Jerry Moreman 


Southern 


Louisville 


969-1331 


T. T. Knight 


William Kidd 


Valley 


Valley Station 


WE 7-2300 


J. C. Cantrell 


W. B. Fisher 


Western 


Shivedy 


447-3221 


Jofem D. Brown 


Han-y Tibbs 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



School 



Address 



Tel No. 



Principal 



Basketball Coach 



D. 


28 


Aquinas 


Louisville 


TW 5-9411 


Daniel O'Neill 


William H. Kleier 






Durrett 


Louisville 




James C. Bruce 


Howard Stacy 






Eastern 


Middletown 


245-4161 


John W. Trapp 


William Hoke 






Fern Creek 


Fern Creek 


CE 9-3267 


W. K. Niman 


Gerry Calvert 






Ky. Military Inst. 


Lyndon 


896-1701 


Nelson C. Hodgin 


George M. Bales 






Ky. Scliool for Blind 


Louisville 


897-1583 


William F. Davis 








Louisville Ctry. Day 


Louisville 


TW 5-3452 


Han-y F. Ludwig 


Delmar Wallace 






Seneca 


Louisville 


GL 1-4330 


K. B. Farmer 


Bob Mulcahy 






Trinity 


Louisville 


TW 5-9427 


Msgr. Alfred Steinhauser 


Edd Kellow 






Waggener 


Louisville 


TW 5-0567 


Ear! S. Duncan 


Rov Adams 






Westport 


Louisville 


425-2541 


V. M. Bioicchieri 


William Tate 










REGION 8 




D. 


29 


Lsbanon Jet. 


Lebanon Junction 


833-4626 


George E. Valentine 


Glenn Smith 






Mt. Washington 


Mt. Washington 


KE 8-4227 


C. L. Francis 


L. W. Mullins 






St. Aloysius 


Shepherdsville 


543-6094 


Sr. M. Francelle 


Rev. Herbert Uphaus 






St. Benedict 


Lebanon Junction 


TE 3-4829 


Sr. Luciana Maria 


Rev. Roger Boehmicke 






Shepherdsville 


Shepherdsville 


543-7614 


Willis G. Wells 


D. J. Ramsey 


D. 


30 


Lincoln Institute 


Lincoln Ridge 




Whitney Young- 


Alvin C. Hanley 






Shelby County 


Shelbyville 


ME 3-2344 


Bruce Sweeney 


Bill D. Harrell 






Shelbyville 


Shelbyville 


ME 3-4869 


Richard Greenwell 


Evan Settle 






Taylorsville 


Taylorsville 


GR 7-2230 


Harvey G. Bush 


B. F. Mullins 


D. 


31 


Eminence 


Eminence 


845-4071 


Clelus L. Hubbs, Jr. 


Cletus L. Hubbs, Jr. 






Hem-y County 


New Casitlo 


346-8421 


Robert Keen 


Fred Rice 






Oldham County 


LaGrange 


279-5269 


A. L. Roberts 


Barney Thweatt 






Trimble County 


Bedford 


255-3268 


Clyde Cropper 


Bruce Springate 


D. 


32 


Carrollton 


Carrollton 


732-5215 


Palmore Lyles 


Jack Williams 






Gallatin County 


Warsaw 


567-5041 


Earl Saulman 


Nelson White 






Grant County 


Dry Ridge 


824-5001 


Ralph Blakey 


Steve Shuck 






Owen County 


Owenton 


484-5509 


Cyi-us E. Greene 


Bill Smith 






Williamstown 


Williamstown 


824-5771 


Earl L. Grimes 


Paul Watts 










REGION 9 




D. 


33 


Boone County 


Florence 


AT 3-3361 


Chester Goodridge 


Don Eddy 






Dixie Heights 


So. Ft. Mitchell 


DI 1-7650 


Anthony H. Hohnhorst 


Lewis Phillips 






Lloyd 


Erlanger 


DI 1-7530 


Robert Gschwind 


Donald Wihmhoff 






St. Henry 


Erlanger 


341-9891 


Sr. M. Hilda, OSB 


Martin Hils 






Simon Kenton 


Independence 


356-3541 


George Edmondson 


Robert Taylor 






Walton- Verona 


Walton 


485-4293 


William C. Doan 


Don Shaw 


D. 


34 


Beechwood 


S. Ft. Mitchell 


331-1220 


Thelma W. Jones 


Edgar McNabb 






Covington Cath. 


Covington 


431-5351 


Bro. Donald Fahrig, SM 


Bob Naber 






Holmes 


Covington 


431-3604 


H. B. Tudor 


Tom Ellis 






Holy Cross 


Latonia 


431-1335 


Sr. Clarita 


George Schneider 






Ludlow 


Ludlow 


261-8211 


Arthm- T. Tipton 


Carl Wenderoth 






William Grant 


Covington 


HE 1-1881 


Charles L. Lett 


James E. Brock 


D. 


35 


Bellevue 


Bellevue 


261-2980 


Roger Phelps 


Roy McKenney 






Dayton 


Dayton 


261-4357 


Dr. W. Dwight Sporing 


George Houston 






Newport 


Newport 


261-2860 


James L. Cobb 


Stanley Arnzen 






Nevsrport Catholic 


Newport 


HI 1-7100 


Rev. John V. Hegenauer 


James R. Connor 


D. 


36 


Bishop Brossart 


Alexandria 


697-3341 


Sr. Mary RosUda 


Joseph Gastright 






Campbell County 


Alexandria 


697-8181 


Edward E. Ball 


Lawi'ence Kinney 






Highlands 


Ft. Thomas 


HI 1-1301 


Harold Miller 


Robert Luecke 






St. Thomas 


Ft. Thomas 


HI 1-2211 


Sr. Elizabeth Marie 


Richard Hehman 






Silirer Grove 


Silver Grove 


441-3873 


Robert F. Dozier 


Charles F. Doll 










REGION 10 




D. 


37 


Georgetown 


Georgetown 


70 


William L. Mills 


Harry Graham 






Harrison County 


Cynthiana 


670 


J. H. Anderson 


C. J. Suthierland 






Millersbm-g Milit. 

Inst. 

Scott County 


Millersburg 


484-3352 


Col. W. D. Haynes 


Owen Dieterle 






Georgetown 


635 


William L. Hampton 


John Crigler 


D. 


38 


Augusta 


Augusta 


756-4282 


Alice Kate Field 


Lou Cunningham 






Bracken County 


Brooksville 


735-3891 


Jarvis Parsley 


Jarvis Parsley 






Deming 


Mt. Olivet 


724-2700 


H. 0. Hale 


Jesse Amburgey 






Falmouth 


Falmouth 


654-3316 


H. C. Rose 


Cecil Hellard 






Pendleton 


Falmouth 


654-3355 


Terry Oummins 


Dwight Wolfe 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 


Page Seven 


School 


Address 


Tel No. 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 39 Fleming- County 


Flemingsburg 


845-6601 


Martin Marlar 


Clay Evans 


Mason County 


R. 1, Maysville 


564-6409 


Elza Whalen, Jr. 


William T. Ryan 


Maysville 


Maysville 


564-3856 


Orville B. Hayes 


Lan-y Wood 


St. Patrick 


Maysville 


4-5329 


Sr. Mary Roberts 


Vrati Stalil 


Tollesboro 


Tollesboro 


798-2541 


Charles M. Hughes 


Joe A. Simons 


D. 40 Bourbon County 


Paris 


987-2550 


Joe E. Sabel 


Bob Barlow 


Cai-lisle 


Carlisle 


216 


Nancy E. Talbert 


Gayle Bowen 


Nicholas County 


Carlisle 


477 


Charles Wilson 


Donald R. Burton 


North Middletown 


North Middletown 362-4523 


Milton 0. Traylor 


Fred B. Creasey 


Paris 


Paris 


987-4545 


Paul W. Polly 


Eugene Clark 


Western 


Paris 


987-3110 


William B. Reed 


William B. Reed 






REGION 11 




D. 41 Frankfort 


Frankfort 


CA 3-8030 


Robert C. Hume 


John Lykins 


Franklin County 


Frankfort 


CA 3-8248 


Ronald Connelly 


Cliff Barker 


Good Shepherd 


Frankfort 


7-9233 


Sr. Mary Petronella 


Chai-les Furr 


Midway 


Midway 


846-2531 


Marion Crowe 


Ed Allin 


Versailles 


Vei-sailles 


873-4741 


Charles 0. Dawson 


Joe Gormley 


D. 42 Anderson 


Lawrenceburg 


839-3431 


James D. Boyd 


Charles Grote 


Burgin 


Burgin 


748-5170 


Patrick E. Napier 


Robert J. Elder 


Harrodsburg 


Harrodsburg 


734-3242 


Roy Camic 


Wilson C. Sergeant 


Jessamine County 


Nicholasville 


885-4849 


Billy Lockridge 


Ronald Hale 


Mercer County 


Harrodsburg 


734-4195 


Zeb Blankenship 


Dick Longo 


Rosenwald-Dunbar 


Nicholasville 


885-5591 


Mrs. Ada Holloway 


Leonard J. CavO 


Western 


R. 1, Sinai 


TE 9-3608 


Robert B. Turner 


Robert Anderson 


D. 43 Bryan Station 


Lexington 


4-1581 


R. L. Grider 


Robert Abney 


Douglass 


Lexington 


2-3733 


Ferdinand D. Talbert 


Charles H. Livisay 


Henry Clay 


Lexington 


2-5565 


Clyde T. Lassiter 


Al Prewitt 


Lafayette 


Lexington 


7-5430 


James D. Ishmael 


Ken Caudai 


Lexington Cath. 


Lexingitan 


7-4775 


Rev. Leo G. Kampsen 


Fred 0. Brien 


P. L. Dunbar 


Lexington 


2-0640 


P. L. Guthrie 


S. T. Roach 


Sayre 


Lexington 


5-5780 


Donn Hollingsworth 


James Florence 


University 


Lexington 


2-2200 


James H. Powell 


Eugene Huff 


D. 44 Berea 


Berea 


986-3521 


Mabel E. Todd (Mrs.) 


Darrell Bicknell 


Estill County 


Irvine 


723-3537 


Luther Patrick 


James Kisei' 


Foundiation 


Berea 


986-4911 


Roy N. Walters 


Darrel Crase 


Irvine 


Irvine 


723-3616 


Joe Ohr 


Joe Ohr 


Madison 


Richmond 


623-4959 


W. L. Holloway 


Ray Vencill 


Madison Central 


Richmond 


623-1530 


James B. Moore 


Russell Roberts 


Model 


Richmond 


623-5452 


Dixon A. Barr 


Shirley Kearns 






REGION 12 




D. 45 Bate 


Danville 


236-6756 


William Summers 


Emmett Broadus 


Buckeye 


R. 3, Lancaster 


792-2459 


W. R. Duerson 


Billy M. Butner 


Camp Dick Robinson 


R. 5, Lancaster 


548-2208 


W. R. Tudor 


David Feeback 


Danville 


Danville 


236-6373 


Don R. Rawiings 


David Cottrell 


Forkland 


R. 1, Gravel Switch 332-7146 


Donald Lamb 


Gerald Sinclair 


Junction City 


Junction City 


854-3956 


Earl Cocanougher 


Douglas Hamni 


Lancaster 


Lancaster 


792-3301 


Leslie C. Dyehouse 


Harold Mmphy 


MaiSon 


Lancaster 


792-3181 


Tommie F. Merritt 


Warren Wainwright 


Paint Lick 


Paint Lick 


925-2711 


Fay Ward Little 


Homer Profitt 


Parksville 


Parksville 


236-3753 


Phelps Evans 


Hillard Combs 


Perryville 


Perryville 


332-8311 


Garland Purdom 


Larry Wooden 


D. 46 Brodhead 


Brodhead 


758-3385 


D. A. Rolbbins 


William Riddle 


Crab Orchard 


Craib Orchard 


EL 5-2541 


L. A. Wash 


Doug Pendygraft 


Husitonville 


Huston vi lie 


346-9251 


Cecil Purdom 


Jack Johnson 


Liberty 


Liberty 


787-3941 


Stanley Bryant 


Pat Tully 


Lincoln 


Stanford 


365-2828 


G. W. Parks 


C. E. Kavanaugh 


Livingston 


Livingston 


453-2121 


Charles B. Parsons 


Preston Parrett 


McKinney 


McKinney 


346-2942 


M. C. Montgomery 


Monty Singleton 


Memorial 


Waynesburg 


FO 5-7018 


Lester Mullins 


Doyle McGuffey 


Middleburg 


Middleburg 


787-2852 


Nathaniel Buis 


Humphrey Elliott 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


256-2953 


Cleston Sayilor 


Jack L. Laswell 


Stanford 


Stanford 


FO 5-2191 


Lee Thomas Mills 


Dienzel Dennis 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



School 



Address 



Tel No. 



Principal 



Basketball Coach 



D. 47 Burnside 


Burn side 


561-4250 


Hobert R. Thompson 


Oscar L. Fitzgerald 


Eubank 


Eubank 


379-4661 


J. B. Albright 


James Reynolds 


Fei-guson 


Ferguson 


678-5229 


Howard Moore 


Herb Childers 


M'cCreary County 


Whitley City 




Johnnie Ray Laswell 


Jack R. Hissom 


Monticello 


Monticello 


348-2331 


Vernon Miniard 


Joe Hai-per 


Nancy 


Nancy 


678-4932 


Herbert T. Higgins 


Garvis Burkett 


Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 


354-2511 


Clark Morton 


Harry Osborne 


Pulaski County 


Somerset 


679-1574 


Edward B. Webb 


Robert Randall 


Russell County 


Russell Springs 


866-2545 


Marshall Dixon 


Aubrey Johnson 


Shopville 


Shopville 


274-3181 


Murrell P. Stewart 


James A. Sears 


Somerset 


Somerset 


678-4721 


W. B. Jones 


Doug Hines 


Wayne County 


Monticello 


348-2643 


Arthur J. Lloyd 


Ray Mills 


D. 48 Bush 


Lida 


4-2331 


C. Frank Bentley 


Joe T. Gregory 


Hazel Green 


R. 1, E. Bernstadt 843-2265 


Clark E. Chesnut 


Noel KaiT 


Lily 


Lily 


864-4330 


R. S. Baldwin 


R. Harold Storm 


London 


London 


864-2181 


Leighton Watkins 


Gilbert Samples 






REGION 13 




D. 49 Amiville 


Annville 


364-2440 


Elizabeth De Jong 


Jerry Hacker 


Clay County 


Manchester 


598-3737 


Robei-t Campbell 


Hem-y J. Garrison 


McKee 


McKee 




Walter H. Power 


Charles Norris 


Oneida 


Oneida 


847-2202 


David Jackson 


Bill Smith 


Tyner 


Tyner 


4-3170 


James W. Wilson 


R. B. Morris 


D. 50 Barboui-ville 


Barboui'ville 


6-3129 


Charles Singleton 


H. D. Tye 


Corbin 


Corbin 


452 


D. P. Parsley 


Harrv Taylor 


Knox Central 


Barboui'ville 


LI 6-4138 


Clinton B. Hammons 


Harold Cole 


Lynn Camp 


Corbin 


1633 


P. M. Broughton 


Jack Garrett 


Pleasant View 


Pleasant View 




George E. Moses 


Earl Centers 


Poplar Creek 


Carpenter 




William H. Ball 


Garrett Bennett 


Rockhold 


Rockhold 


3478 


Warren Peace 


Lane Gray Broyles 


Williamsburg 


Williamsburg 


6500 


James L. Davis, Jr. 


Alan LeForce 


Woodbine 


Woodbine 


903 


Tony McKiddy 


Paul Rice 


D. 51 Bell County 


Pineville 


7-2329 


James A. Pursifull 


Willie Hendi'ickson 


Henderson Settle. 


Frakes 


7-3618 


Robert Hendrickson 


Wayland Jones 


Lincoln 


Middlesborough 


862 


Miss E. R. Ball 


A. M. McKinney 


Lone Jack 


Four Mile 


ED 7-2435 


Chester L. Click 


G. B. Hendrickson 


Middlesborough 


Middlesborough 


263 


Shelvie Fuson 


Darrell Storm 


PineviUe 


Pineville 


ED 7-2439 


Effie Arnett 


John Brock 


Red Bird 


Beverly 


ED 7-3300 


P. P. Estridge 


Ladel McFadden 


D. 52 Cumberland 


Cumberland 


589-4625 


Lee P. Jones 


Fi-ed Parsons 


East Benham 


Benham 


848-5583 


C. E. Calloway 


Carman Weathers 


East Main 


Lynch 


848-5486 


Ernest E. Smith 


Edward Miracle 


Evai-ts 


Evarts 


77 


Claude R. Dozier 


Charles Himter 


Hall 


Grays Knob 


2769 


Charles R. Steele 


James Burkhart 


Harlan 


Harlan 


522 


Roy G. Teague 


Bill Criscillis 


Lo;all 


Loyall 


277 


Nicholas Brewer 


Charlie Davis 


Pine Mountain 


Pine Mountain 




Gema Campbell 


Vernon Conley 


Rosenwald 


Harlan 


637 


William M. Wood 


E. R. Gray 


Wallins 


Wallins Creek 


MO 4-3444 


John H. Howard 


James L. Howard 


West Main 


Lynch 




John V. Coleman 


Eugene Tray lor 






REGION 14 




D. 53 Dunham 


Jenkins 


948 


G. V. Curry 


William Webb 


Fleming-Neon 


Fleming 


855-7597 


Roy T. Reasor 


Ralph Robei-ts 


Jenkins 


Jenkins 


243 


Eldon E. Davidson 


Jim Sunmiers 


Kingdom Come 


Linefork 




J. L. Frazier 


Harold Cornett 


Letcher 


Letcher 


633-2524 


Jeff B. Mayes 


D. C. Taylor 


Whitesburg 


Whitesburg 


633-2339 


J. M. Burkich 


Goebel Ritter 


D. 54 Buckhom 


Buckhom 


398-7361 


Fred W. Johnson 


Raymond Hamblin 


Dilce Combs 


Jeff 


436-2500 


Homer Jones 


Bill Back 


Hazard 


Hazard 


436-3711 


James CaudiU 


Roscoe Shackleiford 


Leatherwood 


Leatherwood 


675-4431 


Bingham Brashear 


Kenneth Colwell 


Leslie County 


Hyden 


672-2337 


Raleigh Couch 


R. B. Singleton 


M. C. Napier 


Hazard 


436-4541 


Paul H. Colwell 


Albert Combs 


D. 55 Breathitt 


Jackson 


666-2805 


Millard Tolliver 


Fairce 0. Woods 


Carr Creek 


CaiT Creek 


MI 2-3585 


Morton Combs 


Morton Combs 


Cordia 


R. 2, Hazard 




Alice H. Slone 


George W. Cornett 


Hindman 


Hindman 


ST 5-5361 


Claude Frady 


Pearl Combs 


Jackson 


Jackson 


666-5164 


J. B. Goff 


J. B. Goff 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH i 


5CH00L ATHLEl 


E FOR JANl 


JARY, 1963 


Page Nine 


School 


Address 


Tel No. 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


Knott County 


Pippa Passes 


785-5783 


Edward Madden 


Edward Madden 


Oakdale Christian 


R. 1, Jackson 


666-5422 


Willard Trepus 


David Gullar 


Riverside ChTistiam 


Lost Cixjek 


666-2359 


Rev. Harold E. Bamett 


Doran Hostetler 


D. 56 Hazel Green Acad. 


Hazel Green 


MO 2-2475 


Mrs. Henry A. Stovall 


Joe Owens 


Lee County 


Beattyville 


8126 


Elbert Hudson 


Eugene Flynn 


Owsley County 


Booneville 


3-2815 


W. 0. Gabbard 


John Seale 


Powell Coimty 


Stanton 


663-4475 


Estil Ghaney 


W. T. Orme 


Wolfe County 


Campton 


NO 8-3845 


Bishop Taulbee 


Lando Lockard 






REGION 15 




D. 57 Belfry 


Belfry 


EL 3-7362 


W. F. Doanfi 


James Hutchens 


Dorton 


Dorton 


639-8832 


Charles Wright 


Ronald Curry 


Elkhom City 


Elkhorn City 


SK 4-6981 


James V. Powell 


Gobel Salyers 


Feds Creek 


Fed's Creek 


835-2286 


Nelscai Hamilton 


Ernest Prater 


HeJlier 


Hellier 


SK 4-8184 


James E. Branham 


Jack Castle 


Johns Creek 


R. 1, Pikeville 


437-6361 


James T. Dotson 


Donald Layne 


Mull ins 


R. 1, Pikeville 


GE 7-9194 


Landon Hunt 


Gary Layne 


Phelps 


Phelps 


456-9310 


J. H. Cromer 


J. D. Cunningham 


Pikeville 


Pikeville 


GE 7-6870 


Charles E. Spears 


Carl P. Mims 


Virg-ie 


Virgie 


639-4774 


Fred W. Cox 


Virgil Osborne 


D. 58 Betsy Layne 


Betsy Layne 


GR 8-2255 


D. W. Howard 


Benny J. Fannin 


Garreitt 


Gan-ett 




Burnice (Jearheart 


John Campbell, Jr. 


McDowell 


McDowell 




George L. Moore 


Pete Grigsby 


Martin 


Martin 


BU 5-3011 


James W. Salisbiu^ 


Denzil Halbert 


Maytown 


Langley 


BU 5-3346 


Edwin V. Stewart 


Gene Erasure 


Prestonsburg 


Prestonsburg 


6-2252 


Woodrow Allen 


Jack F. Wells 


Wayland 


Wayland 


358-3911 


James V. Bolen 


Thomas Boyd 


Wheelwright 


Wheelwright 




Boone Hall 


Don WaUen 


D. 59 Blaine 


Blaine 


OL 2-3624 


Paul H. Gambill 


Roger Gambill 


Flat Gap 


Flat Gap 


AM 5-2164 


Virgil Porter 


Carroll Burchett 


Inez 


Inez 


298-3264 


Russell Williamson 


Evereitte Horn, Jr. 


Louisa 


Louisa 


638-4574 


Paul Wright 


Joe Paul Blankenship 


Meade Memorial 


Williamsport 


789-5050 


Harold L. Preston 


Howard W. Wallen 


PaintsviHe 


Paintsville 


9-3881 


Paul Wade Trimble 


Bruce McLin 


Van Lear 


Van Lear 


789-4932 


Hysell Burchett 


Howard Ramey 


Warfield 


Warfield 


395-5341 


Russell H. Stepp 


John Marcum 


D. 60 Ezel 


Ezel 


PA 5-4545 


Ezra Back 


Henry E. Cochran 


Morgan County 


West Liberty 


SH 3-3705 


Ottis Murphy 


Neil Hunley 


Oil Springs 


Oil Springs 




W. H. Conley 


Paul Setser 


SalyersviUe 


SalyersviUe 




Creed Arnett 


Leonard F. Carpenter 


Sandy Hook 


Sandy Hook 


RE 8-5226 


John H. Vansant 


Garry Fraley 






REGION 16 




D. 61 Camargo 


R. 1, Mt. Sterling 1500 


J. B. Cumningham 


Julian R. Cunningham 


Clark County 


Winchester 


PI 4-4618 


Letcher W. Norton 


Lewis Snowden 


DuBois 


Mt. Sterling 


952 


Arthur R. Hawkins 


William Elster 


Montgomery Co. 


Mt. Sterling 


266 


Calvin Hunt 


Fred Simpson 


Mt. Sterling 


Mt. Sterling 


956 


James McAfee 


Phil Owen 


St. Agatha Acad. 


Winchester 


PI 4-6484 


Sr. Caroline Mary 


Homer Fanning 


D. 62 Breckinridge Tr. 


Morehead 


ST 4-4181 


Reedus Back 


John Allen 


Menifee County 


Frenchburg 


SO 8-2373 


Hiram C. Walters 


Harry Howard 


Owingsville 


Owingsville 


674-2501 


Edsel L. Karrick 


Tom Evans 


Rowan County 


Morehead 


ST 4-4153 


Russell Boyd 


Warren Cooper 


Sharpslburg 


Shai-psburg 


247-2911 


Glynn D. Baucom 


Ruby Ellington 


D. 63 Carter 


Carter 


474-6121 


Thomas E. Phillips 


Dennie Burton 


Hitchins 


Hitchins 


474-5784 


Harold H. Kjng 


Roy Fred Murphy 


Lewis County 


Vanoeburg 


796-5441 


Teddy Applegate 


Howard Shumate 


McKeJl 


South Shore 


YE 2-3323 


Cliff Lowdenback 


Don Tackett 


Olive Hill 


Olive HiH 


326-4591 


John C. Stringer 


Jack Fultz 


Pri chard 


Grayson 


474-5421 


Max E. Calhoun 


Harold Holbrook 


South Portsmouth 


So. Portsmouth 


YE 2-3221 


Sid Meade 


Don Gaunce 


D. 64 Ashland 


Ashland 


324-5225 


H. L. EUis 


Robert Wrig'ht 


Boyd County 


R. 2, Ashland 


739-4428 


Cobble Lee 


Jim McKenzie 


Catlettsburg 


Cattiettsburg 


739-4663 


Jack Clifford 


Larry McKenzie 


Pairvieiw 


Ashland 


4-9226 


Webb Young 


William Davidson 


Greenup 


Greenup 


473-3781 


Etihel McBrayer 


Ramey Fletcher 


Holy Faimly 


Ashland 


324-7040 


Sr. Mary, C.D.P. 


Ray Powers 


Raceland 


Raceland 


836-8221 


H. R. Bowling 


Charles Morgan 


Russell 


Russell 


836-3531 


Frank V. Firestine 


Marvin Meredith 


Wurtlamd 


Wurtland 


836-5931 


Ben Weibb 


Jim Fleltoher 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



The Flying Dutchman 

A good resolution for The New Year is to 
make one kid with a physical handicap happy. 
Every boy and girl wants to be a part of 
our "World of Sports" so your job will be 
both pleasant and easy. Teach those young- 
sters with handicaps that competition is 
doubly rewarding because they have to be 
twice as good as their friends to be winners. 

Your interest in a blind lad or a crippled 
youth is bound to be pleasing to "The Man 
Upstairs." It can mean the difference be- 
tween a future of happiness or unhappiness 
for somebody. That's the reason this column 
has kept plugging Kentucky's Game Guy 
Sports Program since 1949 and is why this 
program has received nation wide publicity 
in the official organ of the President's Com- 
mission For Employment of the Physically 

Handicapped after all, one of our great 

presidents made history during a crucial 
time in spite of being handicapped by Polio. 

If you have followed Kentucky's Parade 
of Game Guys for the past fourteen years 
you have noticed that as the Parade grows 
larger the achievements of these physically- 
handicapped kids becomes greater. 

In 1949 Bob Kirchdorfer of Valley Station 
became the first Game Guy participating in 
track, swimming and baseball. Today Bob is 
manager of the Brandenburg Country Club. 
Next there was a blind boy selected from 
Asihland because he excelled in wrestling and 
wall scaling. His name is Oral Miller and 
presently he is an attorney in Washington 
D. C. Banny Bosler, who captained St. 
Xavier's basketball team with only one arm 
came next — Dan is making good in business 
in the Falls City Area. 

Space doesn't permit recording the achi- 
evements of all of Kentucky's kids with 
fighting hearts who refuse to be beaten but 

here's one certainty take an interest in 

a "Game Guy" and he will never forget you. 

In late autumn this Dutchman checked 
out of Lexington's Downtowner Motel and 
presented his check properly signed. The 
young desk clerk smiled, handed the check 
back and said, "Sign it 'The Flying Dutch- 
man' ". My appearance hadn't changed much ; 
he knew me, but I hadn't recognized this 
handsome, successful young business man 
as Glasgow's scrappy George Carr Ganter, 
Jr., the kid who had defeated "The Crippler", 
to become one of Glasgow's best athletes a 
few years ago. George said one thing then 
and I pass it on to you as the new year 
starts, "Keep that Game Guy Program mov- 
ing; it's worth while." 

The National Basketball Rules Committee 




THE DUTCHMAN 

holds its annual meeting to revise the rules 
in March. The Dutchman has received a 
three year appointment to this committee 
and is inviting you to send your ideas on the 
rules to him at Box 1173, Lexington. 

Already we have the following sugges- 
tions for improvement of the basketball 
rules : ( 1 ) No correction of errors by officials 
should be permitted unless correction is per- 
mitted for all errors — Do you agree? (2) 
Throwing the ball in the wrong basket on a 
field goal attempt counts for the opponents, 
but scoring a foul goal in the opponents' 
basket is a score against the opponents by 
the shooter. This is an inconsistency which 
should be corrected. What do you think? 

Normally only one Corn Cob Pipe of Hon- 
or for unselfish service is awarded monthly 
This month there are two winners. 

Earl D. Price of West Liberty is honored 
because Helen Stacy of the same town says 
this about her father, "He does not do spec- 
tacular deeds for people, but he is always 
performing some small service for some one. 
He does not have wealth but he is willing to 
share when others are in need." This makes 
Earl a winner. 

Ben E. Boone HI pointed out that F. M. 
Stinson of Elkton qulaified for the cob award 
because of his unselfish service. Mr. Stinson 
has the Kentucky Thoroughbred with the 
cob pipe adorning his neck on display in his 
Todd County home now. He loves people. 

F. M. Stinson scored on three counts. (1) 
He loves the kids on Elkton's teams and 
works for them. (2) He was a "sparkplug" 
in the organization of Rocky Creek Lake 
Club. (3) He gives his support to the Todd 
Recreation Center and supports the Golf 
Club financially although he has never play- 
ed golf himself. F. M. is truly unselfish and 
deserving of this Flying Dutchman award. 

The New Year of 1963 offers challenging 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



Page Eleven 



responsibilities. You can help a -crippled kid, 
render unselfish service to an aging citizen 
or make a friendlier place of your community. 
Abraham Lincoln said, " You can't escape 
the responsibility of tomorrow by evading it 
today." 

In Memoriam 




JOHN SCHAAR 

John Schaar, 62, Assistant Principal and 
Athletic Director of the Bellevue High 
School, died of a heart attack at his home 
December 19, 1962. 

A native of Owen, Wisconsin, Mr. Schaar 
had been coaching and teaching in Bellevue 
for thirty-eight years. He was instrumental 
in the formation of the "Little Six" con- 
ference which later became the "Big Eight." 
He was elected Secretary of the conference, 
and he continued in this capacity as it evolv- 
ed into what is now the Northern Kentucky 
Athletic Conference. 

Mr. Schaar was graduated from White- 
water Teachers College in Whitewater, Wis- 
consin, where he received his A. B. degree in 
Business Administration in 1924. 

For a long period of time Mr. Schaar was 
very active in athletics on an area and state 
basis. He was one of the official timers at 
the state basketball tournament for several 
years. For some twenty years he assisted the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
in the registration of new officials in north- 
em Kentucky and served as an employment 
bureau head for this area. For many years 
he was a member of the State Track Com- 
mittee. In 1948 he managed the State Track 
Meet when it was held at Bellevue. 

Surviving Mr. Schaar are his wife, 
Kathryn, and a sister, Mrs. Norma Kehnl, of 
Chippewa Falls, Wisconsin. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
K. H. S. A. A. building, Lexington, on Satur- 
day momin;g, December 22, 1962. The meet- 
ing was called to order by President K. G. 
Gillaspie at 9:30, with Board members Ralph 
C. Dorsey, Sherman Gish, Preston Holland, 
Don R. Rawlings, Oran C. Teater and Cecil 
A. Thornton; Commissioner Theo A. San- 
ford, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. 
Mansfield present. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by 
Oran C. Teater, that the reading of the min- 
utes of the October 6th meeting be waived, 
since the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that the 
1962 football championship playoffs had 
been very successful, although inclement 
weather had affected adversely ticket sales 
in some of the district and regional games. 
He stated that ticket sales for the Class A 
and Class AA two-game final session played 
in Lexington on November 22 amounted to 
$6,974.00, and that Association profits 
realized from the Class AAA final game in 
Louisville, played on November 17, were 
$1,726.62. The Commissioner recommended 
that $150.00 be allowed each 1962 class win- 
ner and runner up with which to purchase 
miniature footballs for squad members, and 
that each of the four teams participating in 
the playoffs in Lexington be allowed an addi- 
tional amount of $200.00 for incidental ex- 
penses. Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by 
Cecil A. Thornton that the appropriations 
recommended by the Commissioner be allow- 
ed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner stated that he had re- 
ceived several requests from member schools 
concerning district, regional, or class changes 
in football for the forthcoming 1963 and 
1964 seasons, and he asked Assistant Com- 
missioner Mansfield to list these requests. 
They were as follows : Bishop David High 
School from Region 2 of Class AAA to 
Region 1 ; Bourbon County High School from 
Region 3, District 1, of Class A to Region 2, 
District 2, of Class AA ; Madison High School 
from Region 3, District 1, of Class A to 
Region 2, District 2, of Class AA; Fleming- 
Neon High School from Region 4, District 2, 
of Class A to Region 3, District 2, of Class A. 
The Commissioner and the Assistant Com- 
missioner recommended that the requests 
for district, regional, or class changes be 
granted. Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded 
by Ralph C. Dorsey, that the recommenda- 
tion be accepted and that the suggested 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



changes be made. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Preston Holland presented the request of 
the Western Kentucky Conference that two 
more Class AAA regions be established. 
There was a lengthy discussion of the re- 
quest and the problem involved which prob- 
ably caused the request. The Board declined 
to change its regulations for the 1963 and 
1964 seasons to provide two additional foot- 
ball regions in Class AAA, but agreed to con- 
tinue to study the possibility of havinlg more 
Class AAA teams in the future. It was the 
opinion of Board members that increased en- 
rollments in member schools will finally re- 
sult in more Class AAA teams. 

Ralph C. Dorsey, reporting for the 
Trophy Committee, stated that his com- 
mittee had met at the K. H. S. A. A. office 
on November 10, 1962, at which time sealed 
bids for the 1963 district and regional bas- 
ketball tournament trophies were opened. 
Mr. Dorsey stated that samples submitted 
by six bidders were examined, and that the 
Trophy Committee had awarded the bid to 
the Sport Shop, Glasgow, Kentucky, the de- 
livered price of each regional set of trophies 
being $60.00, and the delivered price of each 
district set of trophies being $50.00. Cecil A. 
Thornton moved, seconded by Sherman Gish, 
that the selection of the Trophy Committee 
be approved. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

The Commissioner recomTnended that the 
1963 regulations in swimming be the same as 
the 1962 regulations, with the Swimming 
Committee being given authority to make 
any necessaiy adjustments in the classes and 
events. Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by 
Sherman Gish, that the recommendation of 
the Commissioner be accepted and adopted. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Preston Holland moved, seconded by 
Sherman Gish, that the Fort Campbell High 
School, a new K. H. S. A. A. member for the 
current school year, be placed in basketball 
District 8. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by 
Oran C. Teater, that the next meeting of the 
Board of Control be held in Louisville on 
Janury 26, 1963. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Don 
R. Rawlings, that all bills of the Association 
for the period beginning October 6, 1962, 
and ending December 21, 1962, be allowed. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



Football Classes and Regions 

The football classes, regions and districts 
for 1963, as determined recently by the K.H. 
S.A.A. Board of Control, are as follows : 
Class AAA 

Region I — Atherton, Bishop David, Cen- 
tral, DeSales, duPont Manual, Flaget, Male, 
Shawnee, St. Xavier, Trinity. 

Region II — District 1: Butler, Fairdale, 
Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, Valley, Wes- 
tern; District 2: Durrett, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, Seneca, Waggener, Westport. 
Class AA 

Region I — District 1: Attucks, Bowling 
Green, Caldwell County, Christian County, 
Franklin-Simpson, Hopkinsville, Mayfield, 
Paducah, Warren County ; District 2 : Daviess 
County, Henderson, Henderson County, Mad- 
isonville, Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, 
Union County. 

Region II — District 1 : Elizabethtown, 
Fort Knox, Frankhn County, Kentucky Mili- 
tary Inst., LaRue County, North Hardin, Old- 
ham County, St. Joseph, Shelby County ; Dis- 
trict 2: Bourbon County, Bryan Station, 
Clark County, Danville, Dunbar (Lexington), 
Harrison County, Henry Clay, Lafayette, 
Madison, Somerset. 

Region HI — Ashland, Boone County, 
Boyd County, Campbell County, Dixie 
Heights, Fleming County, Highlands, 
Holmes, Louisa, McKell, Newport, Newport 
Catholic, Rowan County, Russell, Wurtland. 

Region IV — District 1: Bell County, Cor- 
bin, Cumberland, Evarts, Hall, Hazel Green, 
Knox Central, Middlesboro; District 2: Bel- 
fry, Hazard, Jenkins, Leslie County, M. C. 
Napier, Prestonsburg, Wheelwright, Whites- 
burg. 

Class A 

Region I — District 1: Douglass (Murray), 
Fort Campbell, Fulton, Murray, Lincoln 
(Paducah), Trigg County; District 2: Crit- 
tenden County, Douglass (Henderson), High 
Street, Lincoln (Franklin), Providence, Rus- 
sellville. 

Region II — District 1: Aquinas, Bards- 
town, Campbellsville, Glasgow, Greensburg, 
Lebanon, Louisville Country Day, Metcalfe 
County, Old Kentucky Home, Shepherdsville, 
Springfield, Tompkinsville: District 2: An- 
derson, Bate, Berea, Eminence, Frankfort, 
Georgetown, Harrodsburg, Jessamine 
County, Lancaster Lincoln Institute, Mer- 
cer County, Shelbyville, Stanford, Versailles. 

Region III — District 1 : Carlisle, Carroll- 
ton, DuBois, Irvine, Millersburg Military, 
Inst., Mt. Sterling, Paris, Western (Paris) ; 
District 2: Beechwood, Bellevue, Catletts- 
burg, Dayton, Elkhorn City, Fleming-Neon, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



Page Thirteen 



Lloyd, Ludlow, Morgan County, Paintsville, 
Pikeville, Raceland. 

Region IV — District 1 : Barbourville, Lily, 
London, Lynn Camp, Pineville, Williams- 
burg ; District 2: Buckhorn, Dilce Combs, 
East Main (Lynch), Harlan, Loyall, Rosen- 
wald (Harlan), Wallins, West Main (Lynch). 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled January 1) 

If one telephone number is ^ven for an official listed, it 
is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Baird, Bill, Box 11, Hig-hsplint, Harlan 1600-J (Bus.) 

Bisig, Roland Anthony, 2419 Broadmeade Road, Louisville 5, 

GL 4-3797, 583-1914 
Blackburn, Adrian, Prestonsburg. TU 6-2401 
Bridgeman, Don, 409 Ridgewood Ave., Monticello, 348-2742 
Brown, James A., 600 Blane Drive, Hopkinsville, TU 6-6308 
Burdette, John H., 462 Bradley Court, Lexington. 4-6298 
Campbell, Ronald D.. 4325 Emerson Ave., Lousiville 9, EM 

7-8587, ME 7-6140 
Carr, Gene P., 3223 Hackworth St., Ashland. 324-8566 
Cawood. Billy Joe, 407 Ivy, Harlan, 1021, 2620 
Chinn, Charles Michael, Route No. 1, Rockport, Indiana, MI 

9-2861, 684-8074 
Coakley, Douglas Price. Box 248, GilbertKville, 762-3640, 362-4280 
Crutcher, Joseph Lamar, 115 Edelen, Vine Grove, 877-2448, 

WI 274-7217 
Davis, Bunny. 594 W. Lexington, Danville, 236-2606, 236-2200 
Davis, Charles, 2735 N. Bend Road, Cincinnati. Ohio. 541-4177, 

621-5400 
Dawson. Alby, 345 Harvard, Lexington, 7-9055 
Dehler, John F., 2523 Jefferson Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 861- 

4081, 241-5288 ext. 9 
Deskins, Tilden, Elkhorn City, SK 4-4031, SK 4-6981 
English, Jerry, Lexington Road, Versailles, 873-4323, 873-4171 
Ensslin, Charles W., Mitchell Apt., Barbourvlile, 6-3276, 6-3019 
Finley, Ben W., llliy. W. Main, Murray 

Fich, Leiand G., 826 Oakhill Drive, Lexington, 3-0559, 2-7847 
Frye, Paul R., 122 Second St., Monticello, 348-3649 
Goforth, Bob, Box No. 2, Loyall. 379 
Goodin, Shirley G., Box 143, Pineville, 337-2284, 7-2435 
Hall. Jack, Elkhorn City, SK 4-6981 (Bus.) 
Hendon, Charles, Route No. 1, Mayfield, 328-3338 
Hobbs. Charles V., 627 Westview, Ashland, 324-9439, 324-2175 
Howard. Bruce L., Broadway Garage, Cox Bldg., Paintsville, 

789-5446 
Hutchens. Jim, Box 103, Belfry, 237-1204 

Jackson, Edward. S. G. Walker Apt., Owensboro, MU 3-0224 
Jenkins. Jerry, Route No. 2, Butler, 472-5982 
Jones, Robert L., North Main, Williamstown, TA 4-8661 
Kilgore, Roger, Maloneton, YE 2-3495, YE 2-3611 
Kirtley, Richard B., 406 W. Main St., Central City, 1324 
Ladd, Ronald E., 306 South Jefferson, Princeton, EM 5-6342 
Lester, J. L. Georgetown, 1117-W 

Lillie, William Wtutly, 1320 Barrett, Lousiville. JU 7-0717 (Bus.) 
Lytle, Wm. Price, Box 295, Newnan, Georgia, 253-1657 
Maymon, LeRoy, 1921 Shelby, New Albany, Indiana, WH 4-7252, 

ME 4-9411 Ext. 223 
Mclntyre, Jimmie L., 1219 Sycamore, Ashland, 324-6166 (Bus.) 
McMurtry, Jim, 317 Lynwood Circle, Springfield. Tenn., 384- 

3337 
Meadows, Marvin, Clayhole 
Meeks, Jack F., 407 6th St., Corbin, 415, 20 
Meiman. William A., 1700 Deer Park Ave., Louisville, GL 1- 

4596, JU 7-6897 
Miller, Jack, Manchester St., Barbourville, LI 6-3962, LI 6-3956 
Miracle. Orville, 531 Kentucky Ave., Pineville, ED 7-3492 
Murdoek, Pat, Route No. 2, Kirksey, 489-2595 
Newman, Bill, 2535 Ritchie, Porstmouth, Ohio, EL 3-6257 
Omer, Harold, 160 North Crestmoor, Louisville, TW 6-4170, 

SP 8-4421 ext. 206 
Owens, Vermont, 132 Laruel, Pineville, ED 7-2406, ED 7-2329 
Peay, Curtis E., Route No. 5, Bowling Green, VI 3-3616, VI 

3-8171 
Peters, Arthur, Keavy, 864-5018 (Bur.) 
Pickens, Jim, 1231 Cemetery Road, Bowling Green, VI 3-9749. 

VI 2-1695 
Powell. Logan G., 771 Shelby, Lexington, 4-1213 
Poynter, James, 613 North Race, Glasgow 
Pureifull, Cleophus, 808 Dorchester Ave., Middlesboro, 2208 
Sanders, Richard H., 209 Parkway Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 821- 

7314, 541-1800 ext. 1956 
Shewmaker, Treffert, 100 Linden Court, Wilmore, 858-5871, 

,^ 5-3185 
Sipes, Frank H., 2327 Lindsey Drive, Louisville 16. 447-2762 
Spradlin, Robert, West Van Lear, 789-3070 
Stepp, Lewis Jay, Warfield 
Swanner, Doyle, Tennessee Ave., Pineville, ED 7-2264 



Taylor, Dennis H., 1406 Hughes, Murray, PL 3-4825, PL 3-5512 
Taylor, Hal, 9802 Orlandi, Jeffersontown, AN 7-6764, GL 1-4330 
Taylor, R. F., Jr., Orchard Drive, Russellville, PA 6-6321 
Toncray, John Edward, 603 South Broadway, Georgetown, 1385-J 
Triplett, Herbert W., 120 Harrison, Mt. Sterling, 1896 
Veneklase, Kenneth H., 3223 Utah, Apt. 4, Louisville, 366-0208, 

778-2731 ext. 407 
Welch, J. D., 3201 Hampton St., AGhland, 324-3337, 324-1155 

ext. 369 
West, Art F., 116 Conn Terrace, Lexington, 2-5175. 2-3615 
White, Carl Wayne, Route 3, Box 83, Cherry Street, Central 

City, 1075 
Williams, Gene, 304 Deepwood Drive, Elizabethtown, RO 5-4831, 

765-4192 
Winburn, David Cole, 2 East Locust Drive, Winchester, 744- 

1740 
Winders, Floyd O., 4235 Forest Ave., Paducah 
Young, Harry A., Box 64, Webbville, OB 2-3406 
Young, Richard A., Webbville 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Contmued from Page One) 
Ruling: There 'has been no violation. 

30. Play: While ball is: (a) on the ring or part 
way through the net; or (b) bouncing in the cylinder 
above the ring, the net is slapped by Al or Bl. 

Ruling: In (a), it is a violation unless it is during 
legal "dunking" action. In (b), it is not a violation. 
Extreme situations cooild make (a) appear to be too 
restrictive, but the possibility of innumerable border- 
line cases makes it undesu-able to leave this to the 
judgment of the official. It is preferable to make no 
exceptions. 

31. Play: Bl: (a) intentionally, but not flagrant- 
ly, pushes Al while he trying for a field goal; or (b) 
flagrantly pushes or strikes non-thrower A2 or an 
official. Is an additional free throw awarded for the in- 
tentional or flagrant phase of the foul? 

Ruling: In (a), the extra free throw is awarded 
if the try is successful, but not when it is unsuccessful. 
If the try is -unsuccessful, there are, of course, two 
free throws, but none are added because of the in- 
tional phase of the foul. In (b), an additional throw 
is awarded bcause of the flagrant nature of the foul 
and Bl is disqualified. 

32. Play: Referee is ready to start the game 
when his attention is called to, or he discovera, one or 
more players of team A with illegal numbers. What 
is the proper procedure? 

RuUng: A technical foul should be assessed and one 
free throw, regardless of the number of players who 
have illegal numbers, should be awarded. Also, the 
official has the authority to order the team to secure 
legal numbers. Failure of team A to coanply with the 
oi"der could result in one or more additional free 
throws. Whether an order of this nature is issued 
must depemd upon circumstances. In most situations, 
it not practical to require an immediate change be- 
cause it mig'ht cause undue delay and legal numbers 
might not be readily available. The official should 
report the incident to the conference or state associa- 
tion authorities so that future incidents will be avoided. 

33. Play: Are free throws canceled if: (a) both 
teams appear with illegal numbers; or (b) Al and 
Bl strike each other during a dead ball ? 

Ruling: No. Technical fouls do not make a double 
foul. Each team is awarded one free throw in (a) 
and two in (b). A jump at center follows the last 
throw in both (a) and (b). 

34. Play: Al is fouled by Bl and appears injured 
as a result. The official suspends play at the proper 
time. Team A indicates it desires a time-out. At the 
exipiration of the time-out, it is apgarent that a sub- 
stitute for Al is not necessary. Before signal is given 
to resume play, A6 reports amd is beckoned onto the 
court by an oiffildal. A6 indicates he is to replace Al, 
which would avoid a time-out being charged to team 
A. 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



CUMBERLAND — CUMBERLAND VALLEY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Ass't. Coach Patterson, Ronald Woods, Jeff Evans. Larry Lewis. Troy Griffeth, 
Jimmy Shepherd, K. D. Petrey, Jimmy Magfgard. Jimmy Gilstrap. Homer Johnson. Second Row; Head Coach 
Saylor, Denny Strunk. Harold Hall. Mike Jaryis. Thomas McDanieL Randall Collier. Mike Granato. Johnny 
Cain, Jerry Davis, Jimmy Dunaway, Leon Lewis, Burl Estep. Third Row: Jerry Halcomb. Paul Royce, Hubert 
Payne, Eugene Mileg, Enoch Pontch, Dickie Gilliam, Dewey Shoemaker, Roy McKnight, James Langley, Roy 
Shotton, James Strunk, Gene Sherman, Ass't. Coach Henry, Ass't. Coach Wilhoit. 



Ruling: Specific coverage provides that unless, 
an injury prevents his doing so, Al is required to at- 
tempt the free throw or throws due him. Therefore, A6 
cannot replace Al. To pei-mit A6 to replace Al in 
this situation e«iild give team A an unearned advan- 
tage. The time-out is charged to team A. 

35. Play: Al seemingly sprains his ankle and, 
as a result, the official suspends play at the proper 
time. Team A indicates it desires a time-out. After a 
minute, Al appears as if he could continue, but A6 
replaces him. 

Ruling: The substitution is permitted and no 
time-out is charged. While it is impossible to avoid a 
charged time-out through the substitution and, in 
some situations, abuse the rule, no real advantage can 
be gained and, in the interest of player welfare, the 
substitution which cancels the time-out is accepted. 

36. Play: Team A takes an excess time-out during 
the fourth quarter but the scorer does not diisoovei' the 
foul until the fourth quarter has end«d in a tie. 

Ruling: Unless the irregularity is discovered be- 
fore the clock starts following the infraction, no 
penalty is assessed. 

37. Play: Official erroneously indicates Al is en- 
titled to two free throws instead of one. Al misses 
first attempt, which is recovered by Bl immediately 
after it touches the basket ring and falls toward the 
floor. Official sounds liis whistle and ball becomes 
dead. Official suddenly realizes he incorrectly in- 
dicated the number of free throws and that Al was 
entitled to only one. 

Ruling: Jump ball between any two opponents at 
nearest free throw circle. 

38. Play: Bl is closely guarding (within 3 feet) 
Al, who is withholding the ball from play in the front 
court. As the official's 5-second heki baU count reaches 
a count of three, A2 comes between Al and Bl to 
screen for Al. Does the 5-second couirt continue? 

Ruling: Yes. Bl continues to be closely guarding 
Al as long as he directs his attention to him and is 
within the distance described above. Bl wUl try to 
avoid the screen. If Bl withdraws, the count is stopped. 



All-Conference Teams 

Barren River Eight-Man Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Ends: Wood, Park City;Matthews, Hiseville. 

Guards: Boles, Park CJt'y; Middleton, Cavema. 

Center: Wilson, Park City. 

Backs: Hampton and Basic of Park City; Bewley, 

Temple Hill. 
Defensive Team: 

Lineman: Wood, Park City, Cherry, Caverna; 

Parker, Hiseville; Crowe, Gamaliel. 

Linebackers: Wilson, Caverna; Wilson, Hiseville. 

Safetymen: Clemmons, Temple Hill; Berry, Aus- 
tin-Tracy. 
Bluegrass Eight-Man Conference 

Smith and Hundley of PeiTyville; Hensley and 
Hignite of Paint Lick; Moore and Ball of Camp Dick 
Robinson; Hensel, Mt. Vernon; Hayslett, Burgin. 
Big Eight Conference 

Ends: Barker, Daviess Co.; Hall, Henderson; 

PendergTaft, Henderson Co.; Hafendorfer, Owens- 

boro. 

Tackles: Playl, Madisonville; Wilke, Henderson; 

Rose, Sturgis; Taylor, Owensboro. 

Guards: Demko, Madisonville; Rich, Sturgis; Long, 

Owensboro; Fisher, Owensboro. 

Centers: Wakeland, Madisonville; Hay den, 

Owensboro. 

Backs: Woodward, Brown, Kennedy and Abbott of 

Owensboro; Hina and Woodring of Sturgis; Hel- 
ton, Daviess County; Gillham, Henderson County. 
Central Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Rivers, Madison; Prall, Danville; Ward, 

Versailles; Alexander, Somerset. 

Tackles: Congleton and Robinson of Madison; 

McBride, Shelbyville; Raider, Versailles. 

Guards: Withers, Versailles; Hines, Sotmerset; 

Critc'hfield, Danville; Lancaster, Henry Clay. 

Centers: Bemiss, Shelbyville; Critohfield, Danville. 

Backs: Ormsby, Paris; Bradbury and Morton of 

Shelbyville; John Jackson and Burke of Danville; 

King and Clifton of Versailles; Stringer, Somer- 
set. 



THE KENTUCKY fflGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



Page Fifteen 



CAMPBELLSVILLE — S. K. A. C. CHAMPION 









(Left to Right) Front Row: Charles Vaughn, Jerry Shanks, Terry King, Terry Blacli, Jack Wilkins, John 
Hnmphress, Ben Cook, Phil Aaron, Ronnie Sadler, Buddy Mason. Second Row : Reggie Pike, Greg Vaughn, 
Lowell Caulk, Don Minor, Richard Sanders, Chandler Smith. Bill Reese, John Cox, George Lynch. Third Row: 
Denny Poore, Irving Dunham, Bob Cooley, Mike X<>(id, Mike Curry, Glen Squires, Steve Winfrey, John Deener. 
Fourth Row: Jim Bryant, Joe Dowling. Phil Callison, Bob Bowling, Dan Mitchell, Ken Druin, Don Sublett. 
Fifth Row: Coach Butch Gilbert, David Cox, Steve Wagster, Joe Breeding, Steve Carter, Mgr. Max Heath. 



Cumberland Valley Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Ends: Ellis, East Main; Mays, Hall. 

Tackles: Evans, Evarts; Nails, Loyall. 

Guards: Maidden, Evai-ts; Hagy, East Main 

Center: Piei-ce, East Main. 

Backs: Cain, Cximberland; Bradley, Loyall; Noah, 

WaMins; Flanary, East Main. 
Defensive Team: 

Ends: Morgan, East Main; Collier, Cumberland. 

Tackles: Evans, Evarts; McGeorge, East Main. 

Guard: Shepherd, Cumberland. 

Linebackers: Chapman, Loyall; Steele, Evarts; 

Granato, Cumbei-land; Aired, Wallins. 

Halfbacks: Tipton, Hall; Watts, East Main. 
Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 

Ends: Phillips, Belfry; Goff, Pikeville. 

Tackles: Stamper, Whitesburg; Sinor, Hazard; 

Tackett, Flaming-Neon. 

Guards: Hamilton, Prestonsburg; Fleming, Jenk- 
ins. 

Centers: Runyon, Pikeville; Skiles, Wheelwright. 

Backs: Hatfield, Belfry; Thomas, Whitesburg; 

ToUiver, Fleming-Neon; Green, Hazard. 
Mid-Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Simpson, Lebanon; Sellers, Ft. Knox. 

Tackles: Manly, Elizabathtown; Settles, Bards- 
town; Coyle, Springfield; Connors, St. Joseph. 

Guards: Hibbs, Old Ky. Home; Beck, Elizabeth- 
town; Phillips, Bardstown; Salem, Lebanon. 

Centers: Crabtree, Elizabethtown. 

Backs: French, Ft. Knox; Mace, Elizabethtown; 

Owems, Lebanon; Phelps, Old Ky. Home. 

Nrotheastem Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Bentley, Spears amd Chaffins of McKell; Adkins 
awl Lee of Caitlattsburg; Whitt and Williams of 
Russedl; Codvin, Raceland; Maynard, Louisa; 
Fields, Boyd County; Witten, Wurtland. 

Defensive Teaim: 

Collins, Simpson and Stone of McKell; Moore and 
Marushi of Caitlettsburg; Hurt and Groves of 
Russell; Cotton, Racelamd; Stollemeyer, Louisa; 
Ross, Boyd County; Jenkins, Wurtland. 



Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Lyons, Highlands; Cavana, Bellevue; Old- 
ham, Boone County; Sargent, Holmes; Nelson, 
Campbell Coimty. 

Tackles: Bower, Campbell Co.; Thompson, Boone 
Co.; Bryiant, Bellevue, Loomis, Holmes. 
Centers: Titus, Holmes; Goode, Boone Co. 
Backs: Auge and Jordan of Beechwood; Lawson 
and AJexamder of Highlands; Owens, Campbell 
County; Cooper, Newport; Perrin, Holmes; WO- 
lowghby, Dixie. 

Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Offensive Team: 

Ends: Brown, London; Sowders, Middlesboro. 

Tackles: Roper, Pineville; Burton, Coi'bin; Minnix, 

Lonriooi. 

Guards: Roper, Harlan; Hamilton, Middlesboro. 

Cenlter: Baker, Pineville. 

Backs: Davis, Harlan; Hayes, Middlesboro; 

Curry, London; Russell, Corbin. 
Defensive Team: 

Ends: Ballou, Williamsburg; Congleton, Barbour- 

viUe. 

Tackles: Burton, Corbin; Minnix, London; Chris- 
tian, Harlan. 

Guard: Ramey, Middlesboox). 

Backs: Stanfill, Curd and Brown of Williamsburg; 

Spivey, Barbourville; Baker, Pineiville; Davis, 

Harlan; Jeffers, Middlesboro. 

Southern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Sadler, Oampbellsville; Flanders, LaRue 
County. 

Tackles: Butler and Carter of Tompkinsville. 
Guards: Humphreys, Campbellsville; Ellis, Greens- 
burg. 

Center: Creason, Greensiburg. 
Backs: Vaughn and Aaron of Campbellsville; 
Norman, Tompkinsville; Mayes and Warren of 
LaRue County; Moe, Greensburg. 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1963 



Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Settle, Caldwell County; Bumette, Fulton; 
Keller, Tilghinan; Durston, Bowling Green. 
Tackles: Nix, Murray; Wadlington, Caldwell Co.; 
Wright, Tilghman; Donaldson, Bowling Green. 
Guai-ds: McDougal, Russellville; Gentry, Bowling 
Green; Curling, Caldwell County; Oakley, Trigg 
County; Morin, Hopkinsville. 

Centers: Hartline, Tilghman; Granstaff, Caldwell 
County. 

Backs: Smith, Mayfield; Covington, Fulton; Wells 
and Faughn of Murray; Covington, Hopkinsville; 
Croonis, Tilghman; Giannini and Camer of Cald- 
well County; Carter, Russellville; Compton, 
Bowling Green. 



1963 BASEBALL RULE REVISIONS 

Below is a synopsis of the 1963 Basdjall Rules 
Changes as authorized by the National Alliances 
Baseball Rules Committee representing the National 
Federation, National Association of Intercollegiate 
Athletics and the National Junior College Athletic 
Association. 

1. All players are not required to wear shirt 
sleeves of a standard length. However, each individual 
player shall have his sleeves approximately the same 
length. Sleeves are not to be ragged, frayed nor slit. 

2. Lime and otheir caustic materials of any kind 
are prohibited from being used in marking the field. 

3. Spectator interference is now defined. It is ac- 
tion by a spectator which impedes the progress of the 
game. 

4. Definition of a line drive is revisea. It now 
provides that a line drive is a batted ball which travels 
parallel or nearly so with the ground througih most of 
its flight. 

5. Definition of a tag-out is revised. It now is de- 
fined as the putting out of a runner (including the 
batter-runner), who is not touching his base, by touch- 
ing him with the ball or the glove or hand when the 
ball is securely held therein by a fielder. 

6. The last sentence of 2-11-6 revised to indicate 
what pla;^ may be appealed. 

7. Rule 5-1-1-c is revised to indicate that ball be- 
comes dead immediately when a batted ball, while on 
or over foul ground, touches a spectator. 

8. When using the set position, the pitcher must 
have pivot foot in contact with pitcher's plate and non- 
pivot foot in front of it before making any preliminary 
stretch with arms. 

9. Rule 6-2-4 is revised so it provides that it is a 
balk if the pitcher commits any of the violations listed 
in 6-2-4a-f, inclusive, while his pivot foot is in con- 
tact vdth the pitcher's plate. 

10. It is permissible for pitcher, when using set 
position, to swing his non-pivot foot back of plane of 
front edge of pitcher's plate to throw ball to un- 
occupied 2nd base only when it is aittem.pt to retire 
runner advancing there. 

11. A strike is dharged to the batter when a pitch 
enters any part of the strike zone in fligM and is not 
struck at. 

12. The order of items under Rule 7-4 (a-g, in- 
clusive) have been revised to be in more logical 
sequence. 

13. Rule 8-3-3 and Note are combined so that note 
is rightfully part of the rule. 

14. Play Ruling part (a) under 8-4-1-b has been 
clarified. The batter-runner is out when his fair line 
drive or fair fly ball is intentionally dropped when at 
least 1st base is occupied with less than 2 out. 



CORRECTION 

Through eiTor the names of three schools were 
omitted from the football ratings which appeared in 
the December issue of the ATHLETE. They are: 
Greensburg (0-3-0) — Class A, Region 2 
Metcalfe County (1-4-0) — Class A, Region 2 
Carrollton ( 0-3-0)— Cl ass A, Regio n 3 

A RESOLUTION 

Editor's Note: In December a Conference on 
Secondary School Athletic Administration was held 
in Washington, D. C. This resolution was adopted by 
the approximately 250 delegates attending the con- 
ference. 

WHEREAS a principal purpose of inter- 
school athletics is to contribute to the estab- 
lishment of the benefits of physical fitness, 
and 

WHEREAS the abstinence from the use 
of tobacco and alcoholic beverages is consid- 
ered to be desirable on the part of teen age 
athletes, and 

WHEREAS the abstinence of tobacco and 
alcoholic beverages is accepted as contribut- 
ing to healthful living for youths, and 

WHEREAS high school age students are 
at a most impressionable stage given to hero 
worshipping, and 

WHEREAS there is need for great dedi- 
cation on the part of school age athletes to 
accept training rules which have tradition- 
ally included an abstinence from the use of 
tobacco and alcoholic beverages ; 

BE IT HEREBY RESOLVED by the 
delegates assembled at the Conference on 
Secondary School Athletic Administration 
that professional athletes be earnestly re- 
quested to refrain from endorsing and/or 
to decline to permit the use of their names 
and/or pictures in the promotion of the 
and/or sale of tobacco or alcoholic beverages, 
and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the 
manufacturers, distributors, advertisers and 
news disseminating media refrain from so- 
liciting athletes to endorse tobacco and al- 
coholic beverages, and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that or- 
ganizations providing athletic programs for 
television, radio and movie not employ ath- 
letes to advertise or recommend the use of 
tobacco and/or alcoholic beverages in such 
programs, and 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that all 
organizations sponsoring programs in the 
area of growth and development of boys and 
girls aggressively support this resolution by 
indicating their disapproval of the practice 
of athletes endorsing the use of tobacco and 
alcoholic beverages. 

Committee: Julian Dyke, Clifford B. 
Fagan, Zollie Maynard, Thomas R. Monahan, 
John E. Roberts, Richard C. Schafer, Walter 
Smith, Kenneth Wells. 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

348 Southland Drive Lexington, Ky. 

School Representative 

FRED "Rock" REECE 

Versailles, Ky. 

Phone 873-3623 

Distributors of: 

Spanjian Bike 

Southern Cramer 

Nocona Stim-0-Stam Tablets 

Wilson Wigwam Socks 

Spalding Butwin Jackets 

Rawlings Adirondack Bats 

Voit Trophies 

Adidas Track Shoes, State of Ky. E. R. Moore Gym Suits 

Dehen & New Era Sweaters Riddell Helmets & Shoes 

SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 

Gene Stokley 7-3977 Dick Wallace 



WATCH FOR THE 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF OUR 

1963-64 COVERAGES 



*7<4e KiWfxten^ Qo4npxi4i4f> general agent 

W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 2-8522 



K. H. S. A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Louisville in your District or Regional Tournament. We have the following : 

No. AFR panel lock molded ball endorsed by Coach Adolph Rupp 

and used by the University of Kentucky Basketball Team. 

No. ARX Last Bilt ball made by Spalding. 

Both of these balls will definitely be used in the State Tournament 

in Louisville. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll, printed with 
established admission prices and numbered consecutively. Also PASS OUT 
tickets, ADMIT ONE tickets, all in different colors. $1.25 per roll of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams. All-Tournament teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we 
can engrave and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered resin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-sihaped steel, fan-shaped wood, and rect- 
angular glass backboards complete with goals and nets in stock for at once 
delivery. A phone call will get them off to you at once. 

FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Tick-A-Way FF-IS Fair-Play in our warehouse 
ready for immediate shipment. A call will get one to your gymnasium be- 
fore tournament time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
ROY BOYD, JIM MITCHELL, ED HENDLEY or C. A. BYRN, JR. are al- 
ways ready to assist you in every way possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE contact HUNT'S 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



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Ship The DaV You BuV'/i 





Hiqh School Athlete 



Class A State Ctiampion Versailles 



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(Left to Right) Front Row: D. Dawson, D. Greene, D. Roberts, H. Dunsmore, B. Grady, G. 
Withers, J. Raider, B. Gregory, D. Brandenberg, B. Joseph, K. Ward, D. Watts, G. Bartlett, C. 
King. Second Row: Coach J. Snowden, Ath. Dir. B. Wilson, C. BroAvn, J. Foster, R. McDonald, 
J. Adams, L. Mitchell, T. Binford, C. Million, R. Clifton, Ass't Coach R. Hager, J. McRay, M. 
Denton. Third Row: J. Horn, J. Harris, J. Donnell, H. Ward, J. Eckman, J. Edwards, P. Updike, 
W. Howard, D. McHatton, K. Ward, J. Harrod, D. Huffman. 






Versailles 25 — Knox Central 

Versailles 21 — Anderson Co. 

Versailles — Danville 18 

Versailles 42 — Georgetown 

Versailles 45 — Oldham Co. 7 

Versailles 21 — Murray 13 
Versailles 21 — Lynch East Main 



Versailles 26— Frankfort 6 
Versailles 17 — Shelbyville 14 
Versailles 45 — Harrodsburg 12 
Versailles 16 — Jessamine Co. 
Versailles — Mt. Sterling 7 



Ofhcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

FEBRUARY 13G3 




Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the De- 
partment of Extension, University of Kentucky. The rental 
prices shown do not apply to schools which use one of the 
special subscription service plans, offered by the Bureau of 
Audio-Visual Materials. 

Swimming 

BEGINNING SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Through scenes photographed both above and be- 
neath the surface of the water, basic techniques of 
swimming for beginners are demonstrated. Land and 
water drills involving kicking, breathing, floating, 
paddling and stroking and pulling with the arm are 
practiced separately, then coordinated as the swimmer 
learns the American crawl. The back float, back stroke, 
and breast sltroke are also illusitraited and explained. 

BREAST STROKE, SIDE STROKE, AND UNDER- 
WATER SWIMMING, e-j-s-c-a, $1.50 
This film presents the conventional breast stroke 
timing the strokes, and the kick. 

CRAWL STROKE, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented in 
this film. The arm stroke, the kick, and the breatih- 
ing are demonstrated. This film also includes slow 
motion shots under wa.ter. 

DIVING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c^-, 1 reel, $1.50 

After a brief history of the sport of diving, the 
following points are explained and demonstrated: The 
hurdle jump, determining the correct distance, proper 
arm action, correct way of landing on the feet, proper 
takeoff and lift, correct enti-y into the water. The 
backward dive is also taught, including lift, arching 
the body, and entry into the water. The motion is 
stopped at various points to enable detailed situdy of 
form. 

DOLPHIN KICK, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

An excellent swimmer, an underwater camera and 
carefully devised teaching demonstrations introduce 
the new swimming technique known as the dolphin 
or fish-tail kick. Analyzing the body movements used 
in the dolphin kick, the film stresses the importance 
of practice for mastery of this efficient speedy kick. 
I'M NO FOOL IN WATER, p-e-j-a, 1 reel (8 min.), 
color, $3.00 

Jiminy Cricket illustrates the "do's" and "don'ts" 
of water safety precautions. Points out the basic 
rules: wait at least two hours after eating, stay out 
when waiter is too cold, never swim alone, and dive 
only when you know the water is deep enough. 
SWIM AND LIVE, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Men of the AiTny Air Force at Miami are taugiht 
to swim from floating to swimming through burning 
oil. The film is useful for pre-induction instruction 
and for safety classes as well as for general programs. 
SPRINGBOARD TECHNIQUES (The Forward and 
Backward Lifts), j-s-c-a, 1 reel (11 min.), 
$1.50 

Skillful diving requires proper use of the spring- 
board, and here we see safe and skillful praidtice over 
the sand pit and at the pool. Shows methods of acquir- 
ing correct springboard technique and denrronstrates 
approach, flight, and entry of pike, tuck, and somer- 
sault dives. 

Baseball 

BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1956, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, color, $.75 
The All-Star Game of 1956 was played in Griffith 
Stadium at Wasihington. Stars of the American and 
National League are pictured in action during the 
pre-game activities. Highlights of the game are shown 
as the National League wins by a score of 7-3. 



BASEBALL ALL-STAR GAME OF 1958, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, color, $.75 

Twenty-five all stars from the American League 
defeat an equal number of National League greats by 
a score of 4-3 at Baltimore. Close ups of the baseball 
stars of today and interesting pliays of the game are 
shown in the film. (KHSAA) 

BASEBALL FOR MILLIONS, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$.75 

In this film a colorful Big League Manager and 
an outstanding student of the game narrates play 
situations covering the official interpretation of a 
panorama of basic rules involving batting, pitching, 
base inanning, and fielding. It is recommended for use 
by officials, coaches, players and fans. 
BASEBALL HALL OF FAME, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, 
$.75 

This film shows the annual meeting at Coopers- 
town, New York, when new names are added to the 
Hall of Fame list. Numerous stars of the past return 
to the shrine each year at this time and are shown 
as their feats on the diamond are related. The history 
of Cooperstown and the purpose of the Hall of Fame 
are explained in the picture. 
BATTER UP, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels (22 Min.) color, $.75 

Produced by National and American Leagues of 
Baseball. Shows the proper techniques of batting as 
demonstrated by hittJing stars of the majors, Stan 
Muslal, Ted Willianits, Mickey Mantle, Ernie Banks, 
Willie Mays and others. 
BATTING FUNDAMENTALS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic skills which must be mastered before one 
becomes an accomplished hitter. Bat selection, stance, 
grip, stride, swing and foUow^through are clearly 
demonstrated in this film by professional players. 
THE BATTING STARS OF BASEBALL, s-c-a, 3 
reels, $1.00 

Who are the big names among batters and what 
makes them good? Watch the featured hitters as 
shown in this film, learn the secrets of their styles 
and forms, and try it yourself. For clubs as well as 
classes. 
CATCHING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic skills in catching baseball are presented 
in this film. How to catch a higih rapid ball, a batted 
ball, a thrown ball, and a ground ball are shown. 
Stance, footwork, and body balance are described. 
Slow motion and close-up photography are used to 
enable the viewer to follow each step or movement in 
each of the basic skills. 

CATCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$.75 

This is a film designed to assist in the coaching 
of catchers but it is also interesting and entertaining 
Correct methods and techniques of receiving, throw- 
ing, signaling and fielding are illustrated by Bill 
Dickey, Sherman Lollar, Yo^gi Berra and Roy Camp- 

DEMOCRACY OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 
The purpose of this film is for fui'ther develop- 
ment of young baseball players in our modern de- 
mocracy and illustrates this tlirough sports and sports 
competition. This film includes a brief history of 
baseball along with a cavalcade of past and present 

DOUBLE-PLAY KINGS OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 
reel, $1.50 
Slow motion and close-up photography are used 
to follow accurately and gTaphically the basic funda- 
mentals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of feet, 
legs, hips, shoulders, arms, and head is explained. How 
to select a bat, how to hold it, and corredt batting 
positions are shown. 

(Continued on Page Eleven) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Orgran of the 
Kentucky High ScbcxDl Athletic Association 



VOL. XXV— NO. 7 



FEBRUARY, 1963 



$1.00 Per Year 



National Federation Meeting 

The National Alliance Football Commibtee and the 
execijitive officers of the National Federation of State 
Higih School Athletic Associations met at the Morri- 
son Hoitel, Chicago, Illinois, during the period of Jan- 
uary 7-10, 1963. The Kentucky Hig'h School Athletic 
Association was represented at the football meeting 
by Ath. Dir. Edgar McNabb, Beechwood High School, 
football clinic 'director. Meetings of the football rules 
committee were held on January 7 and 8. 

Executive Secretary Clifford B. Flagan of the Na- 
tional Federation has summarized the more import- 
nat rules modifications and revisions adopted by the 
1963 National Alliance football committee, and has 
included a report of matters discussed. Mr. Fagan's 
report follows: 

The agenda for the opening session included sev- 
eral exceedingly informative and interesting presenta- 
tions. 

The Committee's Chairman, S. F. Burke, presented 
the National Federation's Executive Committee (Sec- 
tion 1, Northeast, John J. F. Ruddy; Section 2, East 
Central, H. A. Meyer; iSection 4, Central, R. R. Wat- 
son; Section 5, Southwest, R. J. Welsh; Section 6, 
Northwest, John V. Bernard; Section 7, West, R. J. 
Lofton. Mr. Burke represents Section 3, Southeast.) 
The Chairman outlined the procedure to be followed 
in conducting the business of the Committee. He point- 
ed out that participation in the rules meeting and 
representation on the Committee carries with it the 
obligation to follow the rules as adopted unless the 
specific state or organization is authorized to conduct 
an experiment. When a state or oi'ganization adopts 
the rules they are accepted without reservation and 
are to be foliowed exactly, except where an experi- 
ment is duly authorized. No state or organization par- 
ticipating in the formation of the rules has a right to 
set aside any of them. 

On application and with an agreement to submit a 
resume of the experience, experimentation is authoriz- 
ed for a given project. It was pointed out, however, 
that experiments were not authorized which would set 
aside a fundamental principle of the National Alliance 
Football Code. 

Mr. James Lewis, a Director of the Illinois High 
School Association, welcomed the Committee en be- 
half of the host state. He expressed personal apprecia- 
tion for the opportunity to attend the Committee's 
opening session and offered the assistance of the 
Illinois Association in making the meeiting successful. 
As a former coach as well as in his present capacity 
of school superintendent, he complimented the Com- 
mittee on its progressive record and its consistent 
action in the interesits and welfare of the participant. 
He deplored the undue emphasis on "hard-nosed foot- 
ball," because it increased the injiary hazard. The use 
lOf some tactics calls for a reckless abandonment of 
reasonable safety measures. If such an attitude is 
adopted by those in positions of leadership and re- 
sponsibility, it will, in the opinion of Mr. Lewis, even- 
tually defeat itself and harm the overall program. He 
called the Committee's attention to the fact that tihe 



cost for care of injuries sustained in football was be- 
coming prohibitive and that in addition to the many 
other reasons for stressing safety was now added the 
need of conducting the program without excess medi- 
cal and insurance costs. 

As has been the custom at recent meetings, the 
Committee was privileged to hear presentations from 
leaders in football and other areas which are closely 
associated. The first of these presentations was made 
by Mr. Clark Shaughnessy, football coach and tech- 
nical advisor. Mr. Shaughnessy has had unusually 
wide experience in football as a player, coach and 
technical advisor. Even though he has not been official- 
ly associated with the interscholastic phase, he has 
always had a great interest in this area. Mr. Shaugh- 
nessy emphasized the great respomsdbility of the Rules 
Committee in actually determining the kind of game 
and the nature of the contests in which high school 
and college students would participate. He contended 
that the Committee's philosophy be such as to ensure 
that participants derive some physical, moral and 
spiritual benefits from participation. He pointed out 
that the only puipose of the game at the interscho- 
lastic and intercollegiate levels was to benefit the 
participants. He demanded that any rales changes be 
made only after giving due consideration to the effect 
the change would have on the value of the game to 
the participant. He drew upon personal experiences 
and related several anecdotes which illustrated the 
points he was making in his presentation. He agreed 
that it was important to play to win and insisted that, 
generally, teams will be successful as far as winning 
is concerned if they know what to do, when to do 
do it, how to do it and if the team has the desire or 
the "urge to get the job done." 

John Pace, a referee in the National Professional 
League and a foi-mer member of the National Alliance 
Football Rules Committee, very effectively discussed 
the role of the official in providing desirable inter- 
scholastic athletic competition, particularly in foot- 
ball. He called the Committae's attention to the fact 
that it is necessary that the officials be provided with 
a code of rules, logically an-anged. This code should 
maintain the distinct elements of the game, provide 
the proper balance between offense and defense, pro- 
vide opportunities for thrilling experiences to hold 
interest,, and it should protect the welfare of the 
participants. It was emphasized that the schools have 
a responsibility in encouraging men of character and 
integTity, who have the other necessary qualifications, 
to enter the field of football officiating. The state as- 
sociations have the responsibility of devising pro- 
grams and opportunities for neophyte officials to 
practice the art and develop competencies. Mr. Pace 
stressed the fact that the quality of officiating fre- 
quently is dependent upon the caliber of leadership in 
a given geographical area. He recommended, without 
qualification, four-man crews for the administration 
of the interscholastic game. He insisted that, with the 
rather large area to be covered involving 22 competi- 
tors in a complioaited game, crews of less than four 
men could not adequately or satisfactorily officiate 
(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1963 

FEBRUARY, 1963 VOL. XXV— NO. 7 News About Swimming 

PnblUhed monthly. eic«pt June and July, by the Kentucky The 1963 State High School Swimming 
High School Athletic Association Meet (BOVS) for ClaSS A wlll be held in Lex- 
Office of Pablication, Leiinston, Ky. • j_ t-i ■ i • i o i i 
Enured a. second-class matter in the post office at Lexington. ingtoll OH Friday eVeniHg and Saturday, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. February 22-23, at the University of Ken- 
Editor THEO. A. SANFORD , , •' , „, ' x j> oi n /t> \ 

AsaiBtant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD tucKy pool. The meet for ClasB B (Boys) 

Lexington. Ky. and the State Meet for Girls will be held at 

BOABD OF CONTROL the Same location on Saturday, March 30. 

President K G Gillaspie »»"■">• «"^^;'!;^ ClaSS A Will include thoSe high SChoOlS 

Vice-President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan . ; j- rrr-n i ■\ 

Directors-Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66). Horse Cave; Sherman With an enrollment of 750 Or mOrC (gradeS 

Gish (1962-63), Grecnvill*; Preston Holland (1961-65). Murray: 9-12), and ClaS'S B will Include thoSB SChoolS 

?6K £.ufsvni"rorin":' Tea.°ra96i6^4K'pau.s',?i;e.'" *""' with an enrollment of less than 750. Schools 

Subscription Rate »i.oo Per Year are not classified for glrls' swimming. Any 

=^=^=^=^=^"==^=^=^'^=~^" school may enter a class above its classifica- 

Jiom the Commissioned s Office *^'°"- 

Class A will have eleven events this year, 
1963 District Tournament Sites class B ten. There are eight events in the 
(1) Carlisle County, (2) Paducah Tilgh- meet for girls. In(iividual contestants may 
,o\ T iA\ TVT /-. 11 /-\ enter only two events, including fancy diving, 
man, (3) Lowes, (4) Murray Co lege, o ^he Class A events are: 200 Yard Med- 
Caldwell County, (6) West Hopkins, (7) ley Relay, 200 Yard Freestyle, 50 Yard Free- 
Tiigig County, (8) Foi-t Campbell, (9) Provi- style, 200 Yard Individual Medley, Fancy 
dence, (10) Henderson, (11) Calhoun, (12) Diving, 100 Yard Butterfly, lOO Yard Free- 
Owensboro, (13) Meade County, (14) Butler style, 100 Yai'd Backstroke, 400 Yard Free- 
ze ^ /irx T) -rv itr\ r^ ^ ^ stylc, 100 Yard Breaststroke, and 200 Yard 
County, (15) Beaver Dam, (16) Central p/eestyle Relay 

City, (17) Bowling Green, (18) Olmstead, The Class B events are : 200 Yard Medley 
(19) Park City, (20) Metcalfe County, (21) Relay, 200 Yard Freestyle, 50 Yard Free- 
Adair County, (22) Memorial (Hardyville), style, 200 Yard Individual Medley, Fancy 
(23) EHzabethtown, (24) Springfield, (25) Diving, 100 Yard Butterfly, 100 Yard Free- 
Flaget, (26) Male, (27) Valley, (28) Seneca, style, 100 Yard Backstroke, 100 Yard 
(29) Shepherdsville (30) Shelby County, Breaststroke, and 200 Yard Freestyle Relay. 
(31) Henry County, (32) Gallatin County, The girls' events are: 200 Yard Medley 
(33) Boone County, (34) Covington Catholic, Relay, 200 Yard Individual Medley, Fancy 
(35) Newport, (36) Campbell County, (37) Diving, 100 Yard Butterfly, 100 Yard Free- 
Scott County, (38) Bracken County, (39) style, 100 Yard Backstroke, 100 Yard Breast- 
Maysville, (40) Bourbon County (41) Frank- stroke, and 200 Yard Freestyle Relay, 
fort, (42) Harrodsburg, (43) University, Class A diving will be in accordance with 
(44) Madison Central, (45) Danville, (46) regulations given in the 1963 N. C. A. A. 
Memorial (Waynesburg) , (47) Somerset, Swimming Guide. 

(48) London, (49) Clay County, (50) Class B diving will be arranged so that 

Pleasant View, (51) Bell County, (52) Har- the contestants have to perform no more 

Ian, (53) Whitesburg, (54) Hazard, (55) than seven dives (providing they qualify for 

Breathitt, (56) Lee County, (57) Hellier, the finals). There will be four preliminary 

(58) Maytown, (59) Warfield, (60) Morgan dives (No. 101, No. 201, No. 401, and No. 510, 

County, (61) Clark County, (62) Owings- all required) in the morning session. The 

ville, (63) Lewis County, (64) Wurtland. three remaining dives will be in the after- 

inco D • 1 rr I a-i noon, all optional. 

1963 Regional Tournament Sites p^ncy Diving for the girls will include 

(1) Murray State College, (2) Trigg four dives, one required (No. 1, the forward 

County High School, (3) Henderson County dive) and three optional dives, representing 

High School, (4) Muhlenberg Central High three of the five different groups listed on 

School, (5) Bowling Green High School (6) pages 134-135 in the 1961-63 DGWS Aquatics 

Campbellsville-Elizabethtown Hiigh Sch(X)ls, Guide. 

(7) Louisville, (8) Henry County High Girls may enter the meet only as mem- 
School, (9) Campbell County High School, bers of girls' teams. In the State Meet for 
(10) Harrison County High School, (11) Girls, a sclhool is limited to two entries in 
University High School, (12) Somerset High each event. It shall have only one team in the 
School, (13) Bell County High School, (14) relay. 

Hazar(3 High School, (15) Prestonsburg High 'The method of entering teams in the 

School, (16) Morehead State College. meet will be the same as in past years, with 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1963 



Page Three 



the State Office supplying entry blanks to 
the schools whose principals have indicated 
that they will enter teams in the meet. The 
Association will make the same allowance to 
participants for transportation, lodging, and 
meals, as is given State Track Meet partici- 
pants in each event. Expense for the swim- 
ming coach will be paid if the school has as 
many as four entries in the State Meet. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled February 1) 
If one telephone number is given for an official listed, 
it is the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If 
two numbers are griven, the first number is that of the home 
phone. 

Bates, Cletus, Box 226, Virgrie, 639-2223 
Campbell, Lonnie, 424 Beaumont Ave., Harrodsburg, 734-3738, 

734-3292 
Ellis, Walter H., Brandenburg, 422-4031 
Elmore. Jimmy A., 108 Central Ave., Leitchfield, 259-3555, 

259-4175 
Hardy, J. AJvin, 3412 Calais Drive, Jeffersontown, 267-7390, 

267-7390 
Hollis, Wylie, 314 Shawnee Drive, Louiuville 

Howell, Jerome, 134 Allenwood Dr., Clarksville, Tenn., MI 5-6655 
Johnson, John Luther, Virgrie, 639-2167 
Lee, Charles J., 315 Scott Ave., Lexington, 2-3003, 2-3212 
Miracle, Ed, Box 998, Lynch, 848-2903. 848-5486 
Perry, Bobby Wayne, 412 W. Coy Circle, Clarksville, Tenn., 

647-3804 
Petett, Frank M., 123 Groce Ave., Glasgow. 651-2574. 651-2256 
Pogue, Ivan G., Route No. 1, Hussellville, 726-7698, JE 9-7711 
Tinsley, Earl L., 538 Donivan St., Princeton, EM 5-6605, EM 

5-6226 
Wearren, Wade H.. 4112 Stoneview, Louisville, 895-8959 
Wright, Paul, 212 Lady Wash, Louisa, 638-4674, 638-4574 

MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Saturday 
afternoon, January 26, 1963. The meeting 
was called to order by President K. G. Gill- 
aspie at 3 :00, with Board members Ralph C. 
Dorsey, Sherman Gis'h, Don R. Rawlings, 
Foster J. Sanders, Gran C. Teater, and Cecil 
A. Thornton ; Commissioner Theo A. San- 
ford and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mans- 
field present. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Oran 
C. Teater, that the reading of the minutes of 
the December 22nd meeting be waived, since 
the members of the Board had received cop- 
ies of these minutes. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Don R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Fos- 
ter J. Sanders, that the following regula- 
tions concerning fees for the regional basket- 
ball tournament officials be adopted : The of- 
ficial shall receive a fee of $20.00 per game 
and a transportation allowance of 8 cents per 
mile for all necessary travel. In the event 
that it is necessary for the official to re- 
main overnight at the tournament site, he 
sliall be paid an additional $10.00 per day for 
lodging and meals. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Cecil 
A. Thornton, that the 1963 State Track Meet 
be held in Lexington on May 17-18, and that 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



In Memoriam 




HOWARD LAW 

Howard Law, 59, Athletic Director and 
Swimming Coach of Highlands High School, 
Fort Thomas, died of a heart attack on 
January 12, 1963. 

A native of Kentucky, Mr. Law had been 
coach and teacher in Fort Thomas for twen- 
ty-six years. Before coming to Fort Thomas 
he served as a cioach and teacher in Grant 
County, Kenton County, and Campbell Co- 
unty School Systems. 

Mr. Law graduated from Holmes High 
School in Covington, attended Purdue Uni- 
versity, and received his undergraiduate and 
graduate degrees from the University of 
Kentucky. 

Mr. Law served in a number of capacities 
during his tenure at Highlands. From 1937- 
1954 he served as line coach in football. Dur- 
ing the same period he served several years 
as head coach or assistant coach in basket- 
ball. He served as an assistant track coach 
for many years, and since 1955, has been 
head swimming coach. His swimming teams 
won several state championships. He assist- 
ed a number of times in the operation of the 
state swimming and track meets. He was a 
member of the K.H.S.A.A. State Swimming 
Committee. 

Surviving Mr. Law are his wife, Lillian, 
and three sons, Howard, William and Allen. 
Allen was the captain of this year's Higih- 
lands High School Bluebirds Football Team. 



Certified Officials 

Four additional officials have qualified 
for the "cer*tified" rating since the list of 
these higher rated officials appeared in the 
January issue of the ATHLETE. They are: 
Roy Bowling, Joe Kinman, Roy J. Miller, and 
Humsey Yessin. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1963 



The Flying Dutchman 

Brisco Inman, Basketball Official, is a 
"Big Man From the South," although, he 
stands only five and a half feet tall. If the 
Dutchman were asked to name the four best 
officials in Kentucky, Danville's Briscoe In- 
man would be on the list. He would also be 
on our list of Kentucky's finest gentlemen. 

Briscoe knows the rules, how to apply 
them, and has the intestinal fortitude to call 
them without fear or favor — so what happen- 
ed to this likeable young athletic director 
from Centre College is indicative of the dan- 
ger of failure to report ALL THE FACTS 
when asking for rulings. 

A decision by Briscoe to allow a time-out 
in the Shelby County-Madison County game 
caused a reporter to call the Dutchman to 
ask, "May one team call time-out when the 
other has the ball?" He forgot to mention 
that a goal had been scored causing the ball 
to become dead when either team may call 
timeout. This "Sin of Omission" caused an 
incorrect news story to appear saying that 
Inman had erred. Briscoe stoutly defended 
his decision, as he should have, and the story 
was corrected the following day saying, "In- 
man was correct in his ruling." Briscoe took 
the unjustified "beating" in the manner 
which so befits a "Big Man From the South." 
The Dutchman doffs his hat to the short 
whistler with the long appetite. 

Most Kentuckians think that when Edgar 
McNabb finished the football clinics and the 
Dutchman the Basketball clinics their work 
is done for another year. Actually, it is only 
beginning. Requests for interi^retations con- 
tinue until the championships are decided. 
Here are a couple of illustrations produced 
in the month of December. 

Twelve o'clock midnight: The phone 
sounds like a fire alarm and some character 
is calling to say, "There's a rule that's been 
bothering me for three years. I hope I didn't 
disturb you." Well, for his information, he 
did disturb me. In fact, I'm still disturbed. 
I'll never know how that dream came out, but 
neither will Oran Teater. In that dream 
Teater was telling the "Keeper of the Key" 
to press the down button for the Dutchman 
Reporter, but I believe I had him out-talked. 

One o'clock (A.M.) : A coach can't sleep 
and calls for a ruling and he gets it; a half 
hour later the officials, who worked the 




GEORGE MAINES 

game, can't sleep either so they call for a 
ruling — only the facts are not those present- 
ed by the coach — ^and so these calls go on and 
on throughout the weekend nights of each 
season. Confidentially though, I love every 
minute of it — but maybe that's the reason 
Mrs. Dutchman makes me sleep in my sound- 
proof den. 

The one thing this interpreter has learn- 
ed is to preface his ruling by saying, "If the 
play happened in the manner you described, 
I will rule as follows." Incidentally, when you 
are in Louisville for the N. C. A. A. and the 
State Jiigh School tournaments, stop by the 
Dutchman's new offices at 620 South 'Third 
Street for a "Bull Session." 

Did it ever occur to you that you deter- 
mine whether you are going to be happy or 
miserable? Doing two clinics daily to com- 
plete our fifteen-clinic program causes some 
to ask if the clinic tour isn't an awful grind. 
Actually, the Dutchman has a ball. Each 
successive clinic means new friends and 
more fun. If this Dutchman could just be 
sure that he'll have as much fun the next 
fifty years that he had the first fifty, you 
needn't feel sorry for that one hundred-year- 
old Dutch fan who will remember the olden 
days when Herb Tye, Ed McNabb and 
"Baby" DeWeese worked the Tournaments. 

George Maines, the officiating pride of 
northern Kentucky, has something new or- 
ganized in the ninth region in a coaohes' and 
officials' association. A number of officials' 
associations exist over the state, but George 
has merged the two fraternities to effect a 
meeting of the coaching and officiating 
(Continued on Page Six) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1963 



Page Five 



Football Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. A. A. 
Member Schools — 1962 



I OTHER SCHOOL 



SCHOOL 

Anderson 

Aquinas Prep. 

Ashland 

Atherton 

Attucks 

Austin Tracy 

Barbourville 

Bardstown 

Bate 

Beechwood 

Belfry 

Bell County 

Bellevue 

Berea 

Bishop David Mem. _ 

Boone County 

Bourbon County 

Bowling Green 

Boyd County 

Bryan Station 

Buckhorn 

Burgiii 

Butier 

Caldwell Co. 

Campbell Co. 

Campbellsville 

Camp Dick Robinson 

Carlisle 

Carrollton 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna 

Central 

Christian County 

Clark County 

Corbin 

Crittenden County 

Cumberland 

Danville 

Daviesa County 

Dayton 

DeSales 

Dilce Combs 

Dixie Heights 

Douglass ( Henderson) 

Douglass (Murray) 

DuBois 

du Pont Manual 

Durrett 

East Main 

Eastern 

Elizabethtown 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 

Evarts 

Fairdale 

Fern Creek 

Flaget 

Fleming-Neon 

Fleming County 

Fort Campbell 

Fort Knox 

Fraknfort 

Franklin County 

Franklin-Simpson 

Fulton 

Gamaliel 

Georgetown 

Glaisgow 

Greensburg 

Hall 

Harlan 

Harrison County 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Hazel Green 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henry Clay 

Highlands 

High Street 

Hiseville 

Holmes 

Hopkinsville 

Irvine 

Jenkins 

Jessamine County 

Kentucky Mili. Inst. 

Knox Central 

Lafayette 

Lancaster 



G 


F 


P 


1 E 


G 


F 


9 


3 





2fi 


7 





4 








24 


2 





3 


1 





36 


2 





3 


1 





49 


3 





8 








15 


8 





8 








26 


2 





1 








21 


2 





2 








23 


1 





5 








11 


3 





5 








24 


4 





5 


1 





21 


6 





3 


2 





35 








4 





1 


35 


2 


1 


6 








32 


2 





4 


2 





37 


6 


1 


7 








31 


8 





8 


3 


2 


19 


9 





11 


5 


2 


39 


5 





7 


3 





23 


5 


1 


5 





4 


27 


6 





3 








18 


3 





5 








11 


4 





8 





4 


36 


5 





4 


1 





31 


3 





10 


4 


3 


27 


8 


2 


3 








36 


3 





2 








11 


2 





3 








26 


6 





7 


4 


4 


20 


8 


1 


7 


1 


1 


30 


9 





6 


2 


1 


24 


4 





9 








35 


8 





6 





1 


19 


7 





7 


1 





30 


4 





4 





4 


37 


9 


3 


10 


2 





26 


12 





5 








30 


3 





12 








30 


14 





11 


6 


9 


25 


10 


1 


8 








23 


5 





6 








44 


7 





6 


5 


8 


21 


9 


1 


12 








24 


10 





4 


1 





14 


2 





9 








1 


8 





3 








15 


2 


1 


7 







52 


6 





13 




3 


35 


14 





7 




2 


48 


4 


1 


15 







44 


16 





4 







33 


4 





5 




7 


27 


5 


1 


4 







22 


5 


1 


2 







30 


1 


1 


8 







34 


4 





ID 




2 


30 


5 





5 





1 


46 


6 


1 


2 


2 





36 


1 


1 


1 








14 








4 








22 


4 





2 


2 


1 


34 


3 


1 


2 








30 


1 





8 


4 


1 


29 


4 





7 








25 


4 





1 








19 


1 





5 


1 





21 


5 





2 








33 


1 





2 








35 


2 





2 








16 


2 





4 


4 





21 


6 





4 








28 


4 





7 


1 





22 


4 





4 


1 





32 


3 


1 


1 


2 





32 


2 





2 








21 


2 


1 


7 


1 





34 


4 





9 





1 


41 


5 





5 


2 


1 


32 


5 





12 


5 


1 


31 


9 


1 


8 








14 


7 





11 


1 





23 


3 





8 


2 





28 


4 





6 


2 





37 


2 





2 





1 


24 


4 





6 


3 





34 


2 


1 


5 


1 





31 


6 


1 


5 








37 


4 





1 








35 


1 





5 


2 


1 


31 


4 





11 


2 





22 


8 








1 


TEAM 





25 


9 








23 


3 








34 


4 


1 





49 


3 








15 


8 








14 


9 








18 


5 








22 


2 








7 


6 


1 





22 


6 








20 


7 


2 





29 


4 


1 





36 


2 








25 


7 


1 


2 


34 


9 





1 


29 


8 


1 


3 


23 


4 


1 





34 


8 


2 





17 


9 


3 





22 


9 


2 





17 


3 


1 





10 


5 








32 


10 








29 


5 








24 


8 


4 





33 


6 








10 


3 








26 


5 


1 





11 


9 


5 





19 


18 


2 





18 


8 


2 





28 


12 


2 





17 


7 


1 





25 


6 


1 


2 


40 


5 


4 


1 


20 


13 


3 





30 


1 


2 





31 


14 








17 


10 


9 





24 


4 








43 


7 








19 


7 


4 





23 


10 


1 





6 


7 


1 








6 


2 


1 


12 


6 








48 


9 





1 


34 


14 








44 


7 


2 





41 


17 


2 





35 


2 





4 


24 


4 


4 





22 


6 








27 


4 


2 





28 


8 


3 





28 


6 


1 





46 


8 








34 


3 


2 





13 











22 


4 








29 


7 


1 





27 


4 








29 


4 








IS 


12 


2 





18 


1 








17 


8 


1 





28 


5 


1 





33 


3 


1 





16 


2 





1 


16 


7 


1 





22 


7 


2 





17 


7 


2 





29 


8 


3 





32 


2 


1 





21 


2 








30 


7 








30 


17 








29 


6 


2 


1 


32 


8 








9 


10 


3 





15 


9 


1 





27 


6 








32 


8 





1 


22 


7 








32 


4 


2 





33 


4 


1 





33 


7 


1 





31 


2 


2 





26 


8 


1 





20 


10 






Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1963 



LaRue 

Lebanon 

Leslie County 

Lily 

Lincoln (Franklin) 

Lincoln (Paducah) 

Lincoln Institute 

Lloyd 

London 

Louisa 

Loyall 

Louisville Co. Day 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp 

McKell 

Madison 

Madison ville 

Male 

Mayfield 

M. C. Napier 

Mercer County 

Metcalfe County 

Middlesborough 

Millersburg Mili. Inst. 

Morgan County 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling- 

Mt. Vernon 

Murray 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Oldham County 

Old Kentucky Home 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Paducah Tilghman 

Paint Lick 

Paintsville 

Paris 

Park City 

P. L. Dunbar 

Perryville 

Pikeville 

Pineville 

Pleasure Ridge Park 

Prestonwburg 

Providence 

Raceland 

Rosenwald (Harlan) 

Rowan County 

Russell 

Russellville 

St. Joseph (Bardstown) 

St. Xavier 

Seneca 

Shawnee 

Shelby County 

Shelbyville 

Shepherds ville 

Somerset 

Southern 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Sturgis 

Temple Hill 

Tompkinsville 

Trigg County 

Trinity 

Valley 

Versailles 

Waggener 

Wallims 

Warren County 

Western (Louisville) 

Western (Paris) 

West Main 

Westport 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

Williamsburg 

Wurtland 



9 








34 


5 








32 


6 


5 








29 


5 








29 


3 


2 


2 





21 





3 





21 


3 


8 


1 





29 


8 








29 


8 


8 








13 


8 








9 


11 


6 








10 


6 








9 


6 


3 


1 


2 


7 


B 


1 





8 


4 


9 


3 


2 


20 


9 





1 


16 


14 


3 








31 


2 








32 


5 


7 








26 


6 








25 


7 


1 


3 


1 


22 


4 








22 


5 


8 


3 


1 


33 


2 


3 


1 


30 


6 


6 


3 


1 


28 


5 


1 





27 


6 


1 








25 


3 








23 


5 


9 





1 


27 


9 








19 


15 


7 


1 





35 


7 


" 





31 


10 


H 








32 


10 








32 


11 


7 








49 


7 








45 


12 


6 


1 


1 


32 


3 





1 


29 


6 


7 








26 


5 


1 





25 


7 


8 








22 


8 








24 


5 











27 


1 








27 





6 


3 





33 


3 


1 





29 


4 


6 


2 





28 


6 








28 


5 


9 


5 


3 


17 


8 


1 





14 


10 


7 


5 


1 


29 


10 


1 





26 


9 


9 


1 


1 


38 


9 








35 


12 


4 


1 





16 


5 








14 


7 


1 








37 











37 


1 


■t 


1 





35 


2 








33 


4 


4 


1 





27 


4 








25 


7 


8 


1 





32 


5 


1 





23 


7 


6 


1 


2 


28 


8 








27 


9 


11 








40 


9 








40 


10 


8 








25 


6 








21 


9 


3 








36 


2 








35 


2 


3 


1 





12 


2 








11 


3 


6 


1 





34 


7 








29 


11 


5 








33 


6 








32 


6 


5 


1 





26 


3 








21 


6 


14 








17 


8 








14 


11 1 


4 








15 


7 








12 


9 


2 








37 


2 








36 


3 


3 


1 





29 


3 








25 


3 


9 


2 





21 


9 


2 


1 


24 


9 


2 


1 


1 


34 


3 








35 


2 


4 


1 





34 


4 





1 


31 


7 


7 


1 





18 


8 








13 


12 


2 








14 


2 








14 


2 


1 








23 











22 


1 


2 








31 


5 








23 


12 


9 


1 





35 


4 








30 


9 


4 








28 


4 








26 


4 


16 








45 


13 








44 


19 


19 


6 


2 


38 


13 








36 


15 


4 


1 





41 


5 








40 


7 


3 








26 


4 








26 


4 


3 


2 


4 


32 


4 





4 


32 


4 


3 








31 


4 








30 


4 


5 


1 





28 


7 








25 


7 


3 





1 


33 


7 








29 


11 


5 








25 


4 








22 


7 


4 








25 


3 


2 





22 


4 


6 








31 


9 








30 


11 


5 


1 


1 


27 


3 








25 


5 


1 








34 











32 


2 


6 








33 


7 








33 


5 


2 








56 


3 








49 


5 


11 








50 


10 








44 


14 


12 








40 


9 








39 


11 


12 


3 


3 


34 


11 








27 


16 


1 








27 











26 


1 


3 








31 


1 








27 


5 


2 


2 





14 


3 








15 


2 


4 








13 


4 








11 


5 


2 


1 





7 


1 








7 


1 


7 


1 





16 


5 








11 


10 


10 


3 





34 


4 


1 





30 


7 


9 


2 


2 


26 


9 


2 





29 


4 


3 








28 


2 








27 


^ 


8 


2 





23 


6 








17 


11 



33 


6 





31 


3 





20 


2 


3 


33 


4 





10 


10 


1 


5 


5 


2 


5 


4 


2 


16 


11 


3 


35 


1 


2 


24 


10 





20 


6 


1 


28 


8 


3 


27 


6 





24 


6 





25 


7 


3 


32 


10 





31 


11 





49 


7 





31 


4 


1 


24 


7 


1 


23 


4 


1 


23 


4 





25 


7 


5 


23 


9 


2 


8 


6 


6 


24 


9 


3 


36 


10 


1 


13 


7 


1 


38 








33 


5 





26 


4 


1 


31 


5 


3 


29 


7 





39 


11 


1 


13 


15 


3 


33 


4 





12 


2 





32 


5 


5 


33 


6 





21 


5 


2 


9 


9 


7 


13 


9 





38 


1 





23 


7 


1 


24 


11 





33 


3 


1 


30 


9 





14 


12 


1 


12 


4 





21 


2 





27 


10 





26 


11 


2 


29 


3 





47 


12 





32 


15 


3 


38 


7 


1 


27 


3 





33 


4 





28 


5 


1 


27 


8 





30 


9 


1 


21 


7 


1 


24 


4 


2 


27 


12 


2 


24 


4 


2 


33 


1 





28 


8 


2 


50 


4 





46 


12 


2 


40 


9 


1 


28 


14 


2 


26 


1 





27 


5 





14 


3 





10 


6 





6 


2 





11 


9 


1 


31 


6 


2 


26 


7 


3 


26 


3 


1 


16 


12 






THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Four) 

minds. On February thirteenth the Dutch- 
man will make a sashay to the "stomping 
grounds" of Tom "Big Daddy" Ellis to meet 
with this Coaches-Officials Association at 
Fort Mitchell. 

The Corn Cob Pipe of Honor, for January, 
goes to Al J. Schansburg, FubHsher of the 



Voice of St. Matthews. It was largely due to 
Al's leadership and unselfish service that a 
four hundred acre park is being developed in 
St. Matthews. Al's work for the youngsters 
of his community makes him a Man Among 
Men. 

Remember that March 31 is the last day 
to nominate a physioally-handicapped young- 
ster for The Game Guy Award. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1963 



Page Seven 



Schools' Ratings On 
Football Officials 

The following ratings were received on football 
officials registered with the K. H. S. A. A. during 
1962-1963. The numbers foiUowing each name represent 
respectively the number of Excellent, Good, Fair, and 
Poor ratings given to the official. 

Abele, George F., 26-13-0-0; Allen, Charles E., 0-2- 
1-0; Almon, James H., 0-5-0-0; Alston, Rev. E. Dee- 
dum, 1-3-0-0; Anders, Raleigh A., 0-0-0-1; Anderson, 
E. W., Jr., 5-5-0-0; Anderson, Lester W., 2-0-1-0; At- 
kinson, Charlie, 4-5-2-0; Attick, William E., 11-3-3-0; 
Autore, Daniel, 0-1-1-0; 

Baker, Charles J., 5-9-0-0; Barbour, Morris H., 0- 
5-0-0; Barlow, Billy, 7-2-3-2; Bartels, John, 2-2-0-0 
Baskins, Sylvesiter, 0-5-0-0; Baughn, E. L., 6-4-1-1 
Beck, C. Norman, 8-11-2-0; Beheler, Donald S., 1-2-0-0 
BeU, Clarence T., 2-5-0-0; Bennett, Howard, 9-6-0-0 
Bero, James J., 1-0-0-0; Blackburn, Tennyson R., 1-0 
0-0; Blacketor, Dr. Paul G., 1-1-1-0; Blariton, Homer, 
12-1-1-1; Blosser, Kermit A., 1-0-0-0; Bocook, G«orge 
Allen, 1-8-1-0; Boeh, Bill, 2-2-1-0; Boemker, Bob, 2-4- 
3-0; Bond, Jack 0., 13-4-1-0; Bordy, Philip, 2-2-0-0; 
Bostick, Lord M., Jr., 7-12-0-0; Bowman, E. G. "Dick", 
8-7-1-0; Boyles, Jen-y F., 5-6-2-1; Brandenburg, Don- 
ald E., 12-10-3-1; Brichier, Joe A., 0-4-2-0; Brizendine, 
Vic, 14-10-4-1; Brotzge, Maurice J., 12-7-1-1; Brown, 
Bill, 3-15-0-0; Brown, John W., (Lexington) 4-5-1-0; 
Brown, John W., (W. Va.) 0-1-0-0; Buchholz, WiUiam 
J., 0-1-0-0; Bullock, Teddy, 5-5-2-1; Bunn, Gary, 1-0-0- 
0; Burke, Dan, 0-2-0-0; Burke, Han-y R., 1-11-3-1; 
Burton, James E., 1-1-2-0; Bur-ton, John, 9-8-3-0; Byrd, 
Harry G., 7-2-1-0; 

Cain, Paul D., 2-5-1-0; Caldwell, Charles M., 4-0-0- 
0; Caiman, E. C, Jr., 5-4-0-1; Campbell, John J., 5-4- 
0-1; Canter, John, 6-11-3-0; Carlson, David A., 8-6-1-0 
Carroll, James L. 5-2-0-0; Carswell, Ernest L., 3-1-0-0 
Gathers, Bob, 13-8-0-1; Cathey, Gene S., 6-9-1-0 
Cecil, A. Morris, 7-9-2-0; Chinn, Ralph E., 6-2-2-2 
Clarke, Edward F., 6-1-0-0; Clinard, Fred L., 10-2-0-0 
Clusky, Joe, 4-1-1-0; Cochran, Roy H., Jr., 3-0-0-1 
Cole, Harold F., 5-3-3-0; Coleman, Duke, 8-9-0-4 
Cook, Jack W., 1-0-0-1; Cook, Walter E., 0-2-0-0 
Corea, Frank, 5-9-0-1; Coulter, William, 0-3-0-0 
Cowan, R. L., 0-7-0-1; Grace, James, 0-0-1-0; Craft, 
Albert B., 8-10-1-0; Craft, Bffl, 12-5-2-1; Crager, Bobby 
F., 0-4-1-1; Craig, Randy, 1-1-0-0; Creasey, Fred, 8-5- 
1-1; Creekmore, Les, 0-2-0-0; Crum, Edward E., 4-6- 
1-0; Cubbon, George C, 1-0-1-0; Cullen, Charles E., 
0-2-0-0; Gulp, Willard E., 11-5-0-0; Cumotte, James 
R., 5-0-0-0; Current, Ellis Ray, 4-9-1-0; 

Dahlander, Ward M., 3-7-0-0; Dallmann, James W., 
5-3-0-0; Daniel, Ernest H., 4-5-0-1; Davidson, Norman 
L., 4-5-2-0; Davis, Clyde E., 7-2-1-2; Davis, Curt, 1-6- 
1-0; Davis, Ralph C, 0-1-0-1; Davis, William P., 2-0-0- 
0; Deaton, Daniel, 4-2-1-0; DeMuth, Paul E., 7-8-1-1 
Denton, Charles, 7-2-2-3; Detenber, Gene, 5-11-1-0 
DeUtsch, T. C, Jr., 0-4-1-0; Dial, Charles R., 1-1-0-0 
Dial, Jack W., 3-2-1-0; DiMuzio, Robert M., 0-6-0-0 
Dixie, Cornelius, 2-3-0-0; Doll, Louis E., 0-2-0-0; Dot- 
son, W. S., 4-2-0-0; Downey, Robert F., 1-0-1-0; Drake 
Richard, 3-5-2-0; Duncan, James T., 3-1-0-0; Durkin, 
Jack, 20-7-1-0; 

Easitham, Everett, Jr., 1-0-0-0; Edelen, Ben R., 10- 
14-2-1; Elliott, Carroll L., 8-6-1-0; Elovitz, Carl, 11- 
10-0-0; 

Palls, William M., Sr., 0-1-0-0; Fandrich, William 
W., 2-3-1-0; Farley, Harold Kenneth, 0-3-0-0; Faust, 
Jack, 5-4-2-0; Feix, Darl W., 4-10-2-2; Ferguson, 
Thomas L., 4-0-0-0; Fey, Allen, 3-5-0-1; Fishhack, 



Olen W., 2-7-1-0; Fletcher, John L., 7-5-2-1; Florence, 
Robert H. 14-6-0-0; Forbes, J. W. "Jack", 7-10-2-4; 
Fortney, Robert L., 7-8-1-1; Foster, Berryman E., 5- 
6-1-1; Foster, Clifford W., 2-0-0-0; Fos.ter, J. W., 9-5- 
1-0; Fraley, BdU, 7-4-0-0; Frazer, Tom Roe, 0-1-1-2; 
Freese, Oliver T., 3-3-2-0; Fruit, William E., 3-3-0-0; 
Fryrear, William P., 3-1-0-0; Fugate, E. Hugh, 0-0-0- 
1; Fuller, Wilton, 1-0-0-0; Funkhouser, Roy A., 5-9-1- 
1; 

Gammon, William H., 9-2-0-0; Gettler, John F., 7- 
10-3-2; Gibson, Fred W., 10-6-0-Oj Gillespie, Robert C., 
0-1-0-2; Gilligan, Jack, 0-2-1-0; Gluszek, Henry J., 7- 
1-1-0; Golden, Billy Joe, 13-11-1-1; Gour, Robert A., 
15-11-0-0; Grace, Charles K., 5-3-1-1; Grace, H. E., 
Jr., 1-2-0-1; Graham, James, 9-0-5-1; Greene Paul 
"Duitch", 3-6-4-1; Grieco, Joseph R., 0-3-0-0; Griggs, 
John M. 9-7-0-0; Gruneisen, Sam J., 13-12-1-0; Guion, 
John, 1-0-0-0; 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 27-9-2-0; Hagian, Joe, 10-11- 
0-0; Hagerman, Bart, 6-1-1-0; Haffey, Stan, 0-1-0-0; 
Hagy, Harold J., 1-0-1-0; Hall, Dale, 1-1-0-0; Hall, 
John R., 2-5-1-0; Hanes, Edward, C, 9-14-0-0; Harris, 
John C, 11-7-3-0; Harris, Russell, 7-7-1-1; Hawkins, 
Robert W., 10-5-2-1; Heinold, Thomas, 2-5-0-0; Hein- 
old, John R., 2-3-1-1; Heinze, Frank, 11-4-1-0; Heinze, 
John G., 11-4-1-0; Heitzman, Warren, E., 0-0-1-0; 
Hellard, George D., Jr., 9-3-1-0; Hendon, L. J., 4-5-1-0; 
Hicks, Lloyd, 0-2-1-0; Hill, Earl F., 8-10-1-0; Hofstet- 
ter, Joe, 8-5-2-1; Hogan, Cleo C, Jr., 1-3-0-0; Hol- 
brook, William M., 6-6-3-1; Holeman, D. Fletcher, 15- 
6-1-1; Holman, S. T., "Bitsy", 4-4-0-1; Howerton, Jack, 
Jr., 1-11-2-1; Huber, Carl W., 3-9-3-0; Hughes, Robert 
E., 12-12-1-0; Huiet, Fred "Whitey", 2-1-0-0; Hyland, 
John L., 8-2-0-1; Hynson, Fred R., 8-8-0-0; 

Idol, Billy Joe, 6-5-1-0; Idol, Lloyd, Jr., 3-2-0-0; 

James, Gene, 1-1-0-0; Jarrell, Frank, 2-2-0-0; Jenk- 
ins, Kean, 8-9-0-0; Johnson, Bernard, 10-2-1-1; John- 
son, Frank W., 5-6-0-0; Johnson, Harry A., Jr., 7-3-1-0; 
Johnson, Stan, 2-2-0-0; Jones, J. Carl, 12-10-0-0; Jones, 
Paul, 2-0-0-0; Jones, Wilham A., Jr., 7-7-0-0; 

Kallaher, James E., 0-0-1-0; Kathman, Bemie, 1-5- 
0-0; Kauffrtiian, Victor C, 1-4-0-1; Kemper, Russell, 9- 
2-0-0; Kercher, Norman L., 0-1-0-0; Kerr, Kenneth, 
8-6-0-0; Kessell, Harry R., 1-0-0-0; Kimball, Philip 
Clyde, 1-2-0-0; Kimlble, Frank, 9-6-2-0; King, Allen J., 
5-3-1-2; Kleinschmidlt, Richard, 0-4-0-0; Kraesig, 
Charles F., 5-8^2-0; Kratzenberg, Ralph, 4-0-0-0; 

Lally, James J., 1-1-0-0; Lambert, Irvin G., 11-6-1- 
0; Lancaster, Morris B., 7-2-2-1; Lange, William E., 
Jr., 1-5-0-0; Lawsion, Leland, 8-4-0-0; Lee, Charles J., 
0-0-0-1; Lenahan, Thomas F., 8-5-1-0; Lewis, Horace 
N., 1-0-0-0; Lewis, Jesse 0. D., 2-0-0-1; Lewis, Richard 
Q., 0-6-1-0; Logan, Eli, 0-4-0-0; Longenecker, David 
M., 5-3-1-0; Looney, Clifton, 0-1-0-0; Lowe, Gene, 9- 
13-2-1; Lowe, Stan, 9-9-0-0; Lucas, Gene T., 8-4-1-0; 
Lucas, Thomas, 5-6-1-2; Lutz, Charles J., 1-0-0-0; 

McOarlter, Bobby, 2-0-0-0; McCollum, Robert G., 3- 
0-0-0; MeConachie, Byon E., 3-2-1-0; McOowan, Con- 
nell, 9-12-6-3; McGehee, Gordton, 1-8-0-0; McGlasson, 
Eugene M., 3-7-1-1; McHenry, Louiis P., 0-5-2-0; Mc- 
Laughlin, Michael, 1-0-0-0; McLemore, Jack T., 0-3-3- 
0; McNamee, Jack, 2-0-1-0; McQuilling, Gerald, 0-1-0-0; 

Magnider, Earl L., Jr., 0-3-0-0; Makepeace, Wil- 
liam H., 6-2-0-0; Malone, Donald R., 2-0-0-0; Marks, 
Edward W., 8-2-1-0; Marsili, Lee A., 0-3-2-0; Matam- 
zzo, Salvatore M., 1-2-0-0; Maxwell, Ray H., 2-0-0-0; 
May, E. B., Jr., 13-4-0-0; Mayhew, William M., 12-4-0 
-0; Mayo, Henry L., 4-8-0-0; Meeks, Jack, 6-11-0-0; 
Melmige, James, Jr., 4-2-0-1; Mereke, Frank R., 12- 
13-3-0; Meyer, Bud, 0-1-0-0; Miller, Kenneth, H., 9-8- 
1-0; MillerhaiK, William J., 2-6-0-0; Minton, Eugene 
H., 3-2-1-3; Mitchell, Emmett, 11-11-0-0; Mitdiell, 
(Coatintted on Page Ten) 



Page Kghit 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1963 



Responsibility of the Coach 

By Frances Elliott 

Editor's Note: This article is based upon an in- 
terview with Neil Reed, a high school basketball coach 
of several years and at present a graduate assistant 
in basketball at the University of Kentucky under 
head coach Adolph Rupp. 

Any coach can overcome most problems 
concerning^ training, if he carries out im- 
portant essentials, says Neil Reed, high 
school coach of several years and now gradu- 
ate as'sisitant in basketball at the University 
of Kentucky. 

Reed states, "When I began coaching 
basketball two years agio at Wauconda (Illi- 
nois) High School, six boys out of an enroll- 
ment of more than 700 students showed up 
to join the team. In the year before that, the 
coaches smoked and drank and so did the 
team members." 

Armed only with the desire to alter this 
situation. Reed set up a set of rules. "I re- 
ceived little cooperation from outsiders be^ 
cause they thougiht improvement couldn't be 
done. The essential matter is that the boys 
understand the reasons for rules." 

"By the second year the team, which now 
numbered ninety-six try-ouits made up their 
own rules — tougher than those I had given 
the year before. 'Let's make Wauconda a 
champion,' was the cry, and the team was 
beginning to understand their responsibilities 
as athletes and take pride in their school." 

Ooach Reed always remembered a saying 
he had heard years before, "You can give the 
poorest crew a leader who will follow his own 
rules and the crew will become good, whereas 
the finest crew without a leader who sets an 
example will be poor." This was his respon- 
sibility. 

Rules concerning dating were not so bad 
as the boys were allowed to study with a girl 
friend just as long as they were home by 
9:30. "One practice before a game I asked 
one of the boys why he was so tired. He said, 
'Well Coach, you might as well know. Jim 
and I were out late with two sisters in a car 
necking. We meant to tell you before now.' 
This happened during the week and the car 
belonged to the athletic director." 

During his two years at Wauconda, Reed 
spot checked with one boy every night with- 
out their knowing. "During that time not 
one boy was out past the time limit. One 
night following a game two boys riding home 
in their family car got stuck in the snow. 
These boy's didn't chance waiting for a tow 
truck. They abandoned the car and walked 
home. They called me shortly before curfew 
to let me know they were home on time." 

Before the boys rule out smoking and 



drinking for themselves they are properly 
educated in the harm these things can do for 
athletes. "Drinkinig brings an automatic off- 
the-^team, and you know we've never had a 
problem with this in my two years." 

Smoking is something else, however. "I 
had a boy take himself off the team because 
he told me he felt he didn't have enough to 
sacrifice as long as he continued to smoke. 
Although he was a good scorer, he took on 
the sideline job of record keeper. I had heard 
this boy was sneaking around to smoke, but 
I had to catch them before placing any 
blame. Boys have to realize you're fair, not 
merely a policeman. These boys know that 
while they can't play ball and smoke, they 
lose no respect I may have for them as a 
person." 

Reed explains that "What people don't 
seem to understand is that to build a team 
that appreciates rules, the coach must also 
sacrifice. It hurts to have to sit a boy on the 
bench because he admits sitaying past cur- 
few by ten minutes, but he knows the conse- 
quences he must pay and it's my job to see 
that he does." 

"Do you know that once during a regional 
tournament one boy turned in another for 
cursing in the locker room before the game. 
Many in the audience belt this leading player 
would not be benched. I had no choice but to 
not let him dress." 

Soon however townspeople took on a new 
attitude toward this strange traininig tech- 
nique and other schools gained respect for 
Wauconda High. 

A notebook became the basketball play- 
ers' bible during season. In this was express- 
ed the ideas and attitudes boys were encour- 
aged to consider and live by. 

"Our team is almost like a club," says 
Reed, "each boy realizing you must be 
special to belong. You must be willing to 
sacrifice, have high ideals, bedome an ex- 
ample to others, and a gentleman to all." 

"Build good boys and you'll produce a fine 
team. Not always winners perhaps, but fu- 
ture good citizens. One of my team's leading 
scorers was approached by several colleges 
for scholarships, one of w'hich was Stanford. 
He asked me for a recommendation which, 
although I was honest, did not always make 
this boy look good. The boy saw how I filled 
out the forms. He lost that scholarship, but 
his attitude improved. Shortly after that he 
received another opportunity to attend the 
Air Force Academy. Even though that stu- 
dent realized what the outcome might be, 
he again approached me for a recommenda- 
tion. He is attending the Academy." 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1963 



Page Nine 



NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
football games. 

Dr. Tiiomas E. Shaffer, a member of the Ameri- 
can Medical Association's Committee on the Medical 
Aspects of Sports, suimmarized an AMA conference 
eoncemed with head protection in contact sports. The 
Committee feels that, at the present time, a proper 
fitting plastic football helmet provides the best pro- 
teoti'on. Dr. Shaffer repeatedly emphasized the im- 
portance and absoliJite necessity of having any heknet 
fit properly. A properly fitting helmet vdU, when it is 
new, be uncomiftnttiable to the wearer. It must, like 
certain other itemis, be broken in. It was suggested 
that this could perhaps be done by giving the helmet 
to the player sometime before practice began in the 
fall and have him break it in by wearing it for short 
periods of time. The same procedure should be fol- 
lowed in breaking in football shoes. It is also nec- 
essary, if injuries are to be reduced, that players get 
themselves in condition before squad practices are 
called in the fall. There is an extreme hazard in the 
use of cheap heknats and the investigation of the 
Committee on the Medical Aspects of Sports has re- 
vealed that there is a great difference in the amount 
of protection provided between a helmet of good qual- 
ity and the generally cheaper priced head pieces. Dr. 
Shaffer strongly condemned the practices of spearing 
and goring, contending that if these techniques are 
used there detfiniitely will be injuries. In his opinion, 
the matter of head proiteotion was really not involved 
in the matter of goring and spearing because this was 
a matiter of coaching ethics. The face guard provides 
valuable protectiion to both the face and the teeth. 
Research has determined that close-fitting face pro- 
tectors are the most desirable and that a chin strap 
which is firmly attached is preferable to one which is 
loose. 

Mr. Jack Havey brought the Committee greetings 
from the Athleitic Goods Manufacturers' Association 
and expressed his appreciation for the privilege of 
representing the manufacturers at the rules sessions. 
Mr. Havey, who has been in the enaploy of a manu- 
facturer otSf aithletic goods for well over a quarter of 
a century, assured the Committee that the manufac- 
turens were doing all in their power to provide the 
best possible equipment at the most reasonable cost. 
All reputable manufacturers acknowledge a respon- 
sibility in making a contribution for the best interests 
of scholasitic football. Toward this end, each of them 
have a research division which devotes all of its ef- 
forts to developing a better product. Some of the new 
products were shown and special features of each 
were called to the attention of the Committee. The 
area of the head and neck is of the greatest interest 
alt the present time. New helmets were displayed in 
which an outside shock panel of resilient material cov- 
ered the top and back. The panel was described as 
protective and it was pointed out that it was nec- 
essairy thalt it be durable, paintable and would not 
engage when sitruck a glancing blow. If the panel 
would stick or "engage," it could twist the neck of 
the helmet wearer. A helmet extension pad, which is 
adaptable to both new and older model helmets, pro- 
tects the back of the neck from "rabbit punch" blows 
and is made of soft material so as not to contribute 
to the hyperexttension of the cervical area. The fea- 
tures of ehdn gtraps, helmet size reducers, upper arm 
pads, shoulder injury pads and neck rolls were called 
to the attention of the group. The representative from 
the Athlelticc Goods Manufacturer's Association em- 
phiasized thalt sutosftiantial "tried and true" protective 



gear was a better investment than cheap, un'sound 
equipment. In order to provide miaximoim protection, 
a piece of equipanenit must properly fit the wearer. It 
is necessary that gear be properly stored and ade- 
quately renovated periodically in order to get the 
maximum service from it. It was suggested that 
small unifoimi damage be repaired promptly, that 
face protectors should be attached firmly, ttot a loose 
chin strap is, in reality, no chinstrap, that worn 
cleats should be replaced promptly and that low cost 
cleaning or conditioning offers should be thoroughly 
investigated before being accepted. 

Mr. Perry Sandell, representing the American Den- 
tal Association, reported that a survey which his or- 
ganization was juisit then completing seemed to sup- 
port the findings of earlier surveys in that the use 
of tooth and mouth protectors dramatically reduce the 
incidence of dental injuries to football players. He 
congratulated the Rules Committee on its decision to 
modify the original recommendation on mouith pro- 
tectors so that Stock type protectors may be used. 
The action of the Committee was justified on the 
ibasis of experience and it is evident that stock type 
protectors have given protection against dental in- 
jury. Mr. Sandell acknowledged that there were a 
numbeir of problems during the frist year of manda- 
tory application of the rule. It is not at all unusual in 
any new program to be confronted vrath problems and 
unanitioipated situations but, fortunately, these prob- 
lems have been definitely identified and manufactur- 
ers and dentists vfill continue to use their resources 
to make improvements in mouth protectors which vdll 
be used during the following years. The House of 
Delegates of the American Dental Association of- 
ficially vrtted its support of the mouth jyrotector pro- 
gram and has encouraged its state and local dental 
feocieties to cooperate to the fullest in implementing 
the program. The primary concern of the American 
Dental Association, in the mouth protector program, 
is identical to that of the National Alliance Football 
Rules Committee. It is to make it possible for foot- 
ball players to have the most effective protection 
possible against injuries to the teeth and mooith. To 
this objective, Mr. Sandell said, the Dental Associa- 
tion pledges the Oomimittee its support. 

Standing SubjOomimittee Chairmen submitted valu- 
able reports which included information and material 
iipon which the Rules Committee could base action. 
These reports were made by J. C. Harper, Chairman, 
Game Administration Sub-Committee; Lyle Quinn, 
Chairman, Equipment Sub-Committee; S. D. Jackson, 
Chairman, Research Sub-Committee; and ' Edward 
Ryan, Chairman, Statistical Sub-Committee. David C. 
Arnold, Chair-man of the Injury Data Sub-Committee, 
presented tihs National Federation's official Report 
of Pataliti'es resuiliting from 1962 interscholastic com- 
petition. A sumiraary of these reports will be included 
in the complete minutes. The Safety Sub-Committee 
had no formal report. 

Several carry-over problems and new studies were 
referred to the standing committees for further study 
and recomanendation. 

CHECK-UP ON 1962 CODE: Approximately 20,- 
000 National Alliance Football Questioimaires were 
distributed by the National Federation, the National 
Junior College Athletic Association and the National 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Nearly 7,000 
were retuimed and tabiiliated. The proportionate vote 
of one group differed very little from the correspond- 
ing vote in each of the other groups. This prevailed 
for the Cheek-up on last season's rules as weU as for 
the possible revisions for the 1963 season. 
(Continued in March Issue) 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1963 



School Ratings On FootbaU Officials 

(Continued from Page Seven) 

Vyron W., 6-1-0-0; Mordica, William A., 4-1-1-0; Mor- 
ris, Gene, 3-1-0-0; Morrissey, Rockne, 4-1-0-0; Morse, 
Richard K., 4-1-0-0; Moss, Howard A., 12-5-1-0; Moss, 
James W., 7-7-1-0; Mouser, H. D., 8-4-0-2; Mudd, Ed, 
1-0-0-0; Mullins, B. E., 3-4-0-0; Munfcan, Peter J., 5- 
5-1-2; Murray, Thomas, 3-3-1-0; 

Nau, Bill, 13-11-3-0; Neal, Gene, 16-6-0-0; Nickell, 
Carl Duane, 0-2-0-0; Noland, Douglas, 8-11-1-2; Nord, 
Bertrand K., 8-6-2-0; Nord, Ed, 14-16-0-0; Nord, Gil- 
bert, 5-3-0-1; 

Omer, Billy W., 7-6-1-1; O'Nan, Norman, 5-2-1-0; 
O'Neal, Bud, 7-4-0-0; Osbome, Ted, 6-5-2-1; Ovenby, 
H. E., 11-1-2-1; Owens, Charles, Jr., 2-0-0-1; 

Palmer, Carl A., 1-1-0-0; Parker, Billy E., 12-2-2-1; 
Parsley, Clyde, E., 9-7-2-0; Pate, Lloyd W., 11-4-1-0; 
Peeno, Harry R., 4-6-0-2; Pennington, Mel, 0-1-0-0; 
Peny, Alfred L., 0-2-0-0; Pinson, Eugene, 0-5-3-1; 
Powell, Logan G., 6-9-3-3; Powers, Tom, 0-3-0-0; Pul- 
lins, Robert G., 0-1-0-0; 

Rapp, J. Lowell, 1-0-0-0; Rapp, William, 1-1-0-0; 
Reddington, Jim, 4-12-1-0; Reece, Fred, 14-7-0-0; Reed, 
Gordon, 7-6-0-0; Renfi-o, John E., 3-0-2-0; Rentz, 
Thomas W., 13-2-1-1; Rhatigan, Alfred J., 1-8-1-0; 
Rieman, Bob, 0-5-1-0; Riggins, Jason, 8-5-1-0; Riggs, 
William T., 5-4-1-1; Robinson, Don, 2-6-1-0; Roettger, 
W. H., 4-7-1-0; Rolph, Harold J., 2-1-0-0; Rudolph, 
Fred, Jr., 15-11-0-0; Russell, Charles B., Jr., 12-12-1-2; 
Russell, Gary E., 0-1-0-0; Russell, Joe, 15-9-1-0; Russ- 
man, Godfrey F., 2-2-1-1; 

Sacra, Gresham, 3-9-1-0; Sanders, Mel, 13-3-1-1; 
Sapp, Edward, 5-5-0-0; Sauter, Harold S., 10-16-2-0; 
Saylor, Ben H., 1-0-0-0; Soharferaberger, Irv T., 0-5-2- 
0; Sehiering, Jack H., 2-2-0-0; Schlioh, Paul, 9-7-5-0; 
Schmitt, Karl F., 13-5-3-0; Schmitt, Paul E., 6-7-0-0; 
Schutz, John J., Jr., 0-3-1-5; Schwetsohenau, Paul, 2- 
0-1-0; Scott, Bill, 9-8-1-1; Scott, Luither, 0-1-2-0; Seale, 
Frank E., 5-3-2-0; Seale, William E., 6-3-3-1; Sellier, 
Ed, Jr., 4-5-1-0; Sellman, John B., 6-3-0-0; Selvy, Curt, 
17-11-3-0; Shanks, Thomias E., 1-2-1-0; Shiaw, John H., 
8-6-0-0; Shaw, Stanley E., 2-2-1-0; Sheets, William C, 
2-0-0-0; Shewmaker, Wayne, 11-4-1-1; Showalter, John, 
10-4-1-0; Shumate, Roy V., 6-1-1-0; Sicnlair, George 
H., 7-5-0-0; Skinner, Earnest, 0-0-3-0; Sloan, Wallace 
P., 9-12-3-0; Smith, Edgar J., 6-21-6-0; Smith Walter 
K., 0-2-0-0; Snyder, Gus, 1-0-0-0; Spencer, H. Edward, 
2-2-0-0; Stambaugh, Robert A., 1-1-0-1; Sbaten, Joseph 
B., 2-3-0-0; Steele, Charles, 1-6-0-0; Stephenson, 
Harry, 15-3-0-0; Stevens, Alex, 7-7-0-0; Stevens, Wil- 
liam D., 8-11-2-1; Stewart, Herbert, 0-4-0-0; Stone, 
Clifton, 4-1-0-0; Straight, Roy, 0-1-0-0; Strain, Rich- 
ard P., 8-5-1-0; Strimer, Albert C, 1-0-0-0; Strong, 
Amett, 2-3-1-0; Stump, Bennett, 1-0-0-0; Sullivan, A. 
G., 2-8-0-0; Sullivan, Don Chris, 14-6-3-0; Swinford, 
John, 8-4-1-0; 

Tackett, Jay, 4-8-1-0; Taylor, D. C, 2-3-0-0; Tay- 
lor, Dennie H., 2-5-1-0; Tharpe, Robert L., 0-2-0-0; 
Thomas, Charles, 6-3-0-0; Thomas, Frank M., 1-2-0-0; 
Thomas, Raymond E., 6-0-1-1; Thompson, Jack, 23- 
16-2-0; Thompson, Jack F., Jr., 34-6-0-0; Thurman, 
J. W., 3-2-0-0; Timmering, George E., 2-5-0-0; Tirey, 
James H., Lt. Col., 4-4-0-0; Trautwein, Jim, 5-1-3-1; 
Treas, Joe W., 6-5-1-1; Trunzo, Nick, 6-6-0-1; 

VanGilder, Bill, 2-1-1-0; VanHoose, Jack D., 6-3- 
2-0; Vankirit, Alvia S., 1-7-5-0; Van Meter, David G., 
8-9-1-0; Vaughan, Dick, 0-2-0-0; Vennari, Paul, 1-0-1- 
0; Vennell, Robert H., 3-1-0-0; Vinciguerra, Philip, 3- 
2-0-1; Visscher, Robert W., 3-0-1-0; 

Waide, Harry D., 5-2-1-0; Walker, Julian R., 3-2- 
2-1; Walker, Paul R., 10-11-1-0; Wanchic, Nick, 14-7- 
1-2; Warren, Kenneth A., 1-3-0-1; Watson, Ronald L., 



0-3-0-0; Watts, Shirley R., 11-6-3-0; Weaver, Ray, 1- 
4-1-0; Weber, David, 4-5-0-1; Welch, Bill, 0-3-0-0; 
Welch, J. D., 5-2-0-1; Welch, Tom, 1-5-2-0; Werko- 
witz. Jack, 2-1-0-1; White, James 2-2-0-0; Whittemore, 
Paul F., 0-5-0-3; Wiggington, Al, Sr., 9-7-2-0; Wil- 
liams, Bert 0., 3-2-0-1; Williams, Gene, 7-4-1-0; Wil- 
liams, James H., 3-4-0-1; Willis, Donald A., 0-2-0-1 
Wilson, Louis 0., 3-0-0-0; Wilson, John Pope, 1-5-0-1 
Winchester, Roy, 0-1-0-0; Wise, Billy V., 13-9-2-0 
Wise, Jack, 16-8-1-0; Womack, William H., 9-4-2-0 
Wood, Paul, 1-1-1-0; Wurtz, Emil, 0-2-1-0; Wyatt, 
William J., 8-4-6-1; Zimmer, Tom, 4-7-2-1. 



RESPONSIBILITY OF THE COACH 

(Continued from Page Eight) 

Coaoh Reed feels that all the rules and 
advocating of building good attitude, apprec- 
iation, and respect is fruitless if the coaoh 
does not set the example first. "You must 
meet the team with a positive approach. I 
know this business of setting a good example 
is a workable situation. The team knows they 
are expected to keep the rules because I do 
myself. It takes time to gain their trust, but 
believe me, it's every bit worth the while. It's 
a good feeling to see just how wonderful 
youngsters can become, and that you may 
have helped lead them toward this." 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

(Continued from Page Three) 
the Commissioner be authorized to set the 
dates and determine the sites of the other 
spring events. The motion was carried un- 
animously. 

The Commissioner read a letter from Mr. 
Charles Quire, President of the Louisville 
Coaches Association, requesting for his or- 
ganization Board sanction of an All-Star 
football game to be played in Louisville next 
August. The Board declined to change its 
policy adopted some two years ago, to the 
effect that it would give its sanction only to 
the football and basketball games sponsored 
each August by the Kentucky Higlh School 
Coaches Association. 

The Commissioner stated that ties exist- 
ed in the district basketball tournament bal- 
loting in Districts 5, 35, and 40. Poster J. 
Sanders moved, seconded by Don R. Raw- 
lings, that the tournaments in District 5, 35, 
and 40 be awarded respectively to the Cald- 
well County High School, the Newport High 
School, and the Bourbon County High School. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Sherman Gis'h moved, seconded by Ralph 
C. Dorsey, that all bills of the Association for 
the period beginning December 22, 1962, and 
ending January 25, 1963, be approved. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1963 



Page Elev«i 



FILMS 

(Continjued from Inside Fronlt Cover) 

HITTING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used 
to follow aoourately and graphioally the basic funda- 
mentals of hitting in baseball. Coordination of feet, 
legs, hips, shoulders, arms, and head is explained. 
How to seleot a bat, how to hold it, and correct bat- 
ting position are shown. 

INFIELD PLAY AT 1st and 3rd, e-j-s-c^a, 2 reels, 
$.75 

The Jfumdiamentals and finer points of infield play 
at first and third base are illustrated by big league 
players. Fielding, stance, throwing, tagging runners, 
etc., pictured, often in slow motion. Siponsored by A. 
G. Spalding Co., The American and National Leagues. 
Inside Baseball, j-s, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundamentlas of baseball, inaluding pitching, bat- 
ting, fielding and base-i-unning, are demonstrated. 

1957 KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL A. A. BASEBALL 
TOURNAMENT, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, color, 
$.75 
duPont Manual defeated Owensboro High for the 

championship by a score of 8-3. All of the final game 

is shown in color. 

OFFICIAL BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $.75 

Informaitive and entertaining play situations used 
to depict official rules interpretations covering the 
ptoses of batting, pitching, base running, fielding and 
umpiring. Stimulates interest and knowledge for fans, 
players, officials and baseball admdnistrators. 

PITCHING STARS OF BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
$.75 
Sihows four of the leading pitchers in action. 
Types of pitches and methods for practice are por- 
trayed. 

PLAY BALL SON, j-s, IVa reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film showing a group 
of fourteen- year-old boys Who are experts in baseball, 
Correot method of hitting, catching, and throwing 
are demonstrated in natural and slow motion. Based 
on book by Bent V. Dunne. 

THROWING IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up and sitop photography are 
used in presenting the basic fundamentals of throwing 
in baseball. Instructions are given for the over-head, 
three-quarter side, side, and underhand throws. Co- 
ordination of fioot and arm motion is stressed, as well 
as coordination of the body as a whole. 

TOUCHING ALL BASES, j-s-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters baseball 
by showing various American League sitars playing 
their positions. It is also intended to give fans as a 
whole a better understanding and knowledge of the 
national pasitime. The film shows Farther Flanagan 
and his Boys Town Team, the Hall of Fame ceremon- 
ies in Cooperstown, New York, and scenes from night 
baseball g^mes. 

THE UMPIRE IN BASEBALL, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 
■Summarizes importance of the umpire to the 
baseball game. Explanation of the duties of umpire 
and also qualifications for job, showing Where they 
receive their training. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

HighldghrtK of the game between the Cleveland 



Indians and the New York Giants are sihown in this 
film. The Gianlts, sparked by the sensational hitting 
of Rhodes, defeated the Indians in four straight games. 
The Indians had set a record for the number of gam.es 
won in winning the American League Pennant. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1955, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, color, $.75 
Exciting moments of the seven games between the 
Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees are 
shown in tiuis film. The commentary leading up to each 
game makes the film interesting as the Dodgers win 
the world championship. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1957, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

The American League dhampion New York Yank- 
ees, carry the series the full seven games before bow- 
ing to the Milwaukee Braves, champion of the Na- 
tional League. The film catches most of the hitting 
and shows the pilays in wtridh runs were scored in each 
game. The narrator, Lew Fonseca, describes the play 
and fills in the backgroimd with interesting bits of 
information concerining the game. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1959, e-js-c^a, 4 reels, color, $.75 
The highlights of the six games played in the 
series between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the Chi- 
cago White Sox are shown in this film. The Dodgers 
won the series by defeating the Indians four games to 
two. Most of the scoring plays are filmed, along with 
many of the outstanding defensive plays. The color 
that goes with these games is captured in the film. 

WORLD SERIES OF 1960, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, (44 
Min.), color, $.75 
New York Yankees of the American League 
carried th-e series its full seven games before bowing 
to the National League Pittsburg Bucs. Highlights of 
all seven games are shown and the action described. 

WORLD SEIRIES OF 1961, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels (44 min.), 
color, $.75 
Narrated by Mel Allen, this film shows the Cin- 
cinnati Reds were able to win only the second game 
in the series against the New York Yankees. Superb 
pitching of Whitey Ford and batting power of the 
Yankees brought them the world's championship after 
five games. 

Golf 

SAVING STROKES WITH SAM SNEAD, s-c-a, 1 
reel, $1.50 
Golf champion Sam Snead illustrates his grip, his 
stance, his swing on each of several types of golf 
situations. Slow motion and "freeze" Shots help to 
clarify the instruobion. Shots and driver, brassie, and 
various irons for difficult lies are illustrated and 
finally his putting technique is sihown. 

Tennis 

ADVANCED TENNIS, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

While working with a tennis pupil. Bill Tilden 
narrates and demonsitrates. Showing adivanced tech- 
niques of tennis. 

BEGINNING TENNIS, e-j-s-c-a, 1% reels, (14 min.), 
$2.50 
Shows how the tennis instructor teaches tennis to 
beginning and advanced students. Incliides an analysis 
of the basic fundamentals of tennis-serving, forehand 
and backhand drive, forehand and backhand volley, 
and the smash. Shows actual play situations in which 
these fundamentals are emphasized, and also indudes 
individual demonstration and analysis. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1963 



WATCH FOR THE 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF OUR 

1963-64 COVERAGES 



*7<4e ICi4i4fdeH. Ganup^imf, general agent 



W. E. KINGSLEY 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



CHARLES C. PRICE 



PHONE 2-8522 



Track 

THE BROAD JUMP, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Controlled speed-'timing and coordination — de- 
velopment of leg's and torso — mobility of pelvis and 
hips, one, two, three style — ^foot roll — ^single and triple 
air sitride — soft versus hard take off — arm position. 
DISCUS, j-s-c^, 1 reel, $1.50 

Principle of centrifugal force — muscle develop- 
ment for side arm throw — ^grips — finger roll — heel of 
thumb pressure — finger exercises — clockwise spin — 
hip snap — reverse and non-reverse styles. 
DISTANCE RACES, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 meters and steeple- 
chase are demonstrated. Style of distance runner is 
contrasted with that of dash man. Difference in typical 
physiques are shown. Slow motion photography is 
used to analyze movements. 
DISTANCES, j^-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Style — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoid- 
ing shin splint — controlled tension — forward knee re- 
flex — sta-aight line running — automatic stride. 
THE HIGH JUMP, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style 
— body lean and reverse — approach — body tension — 
coordination of arm and leg action. 
THE HURDLES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg action — 
rhythmic running — ■hurdlling, calisthenics — body bal- 
ance — correct clearance — circular stepover action — 
adapting styles of physiques. 
THE JAVELIN, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Four stage catapult throw — preliminary run — 
concluding stride — ^throwing stance — ^throwing and 
reverse — alltemafcive hand and finger grips — facing 



position — balance of stomach and back muscle ten- 
sion — throwing angle — ^body and leg coordination drills 
• — flexibility exercises. 
JUMPS AND POLE VAULT, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Demonstrations from actual competition are 
shown for running high- jump; running broad-jump; 
hop, step and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion 
photography is used for detailed study of form. 
MIDDLE DISTANCES, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques — ^ball of foot running — auto- 
maibic stride — pendulum and bicycle stride — exercise — 
counter balanced arm action — ^push drive — jockeying 
for position. 
POLE VAULT, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercis- 
es — ^i-unning action — grip — selecting the pole — take-off 
— Wostem and Eastern style — ^slotting — novice train- 
ing. 
THE RELAYS, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Passing — ^visual pass — blind pass — right and left 
exchange — merging of runners' speed — ^baton grips- — 
relay starts, underhand action- — cup style — overhand 
sprint pass — ^fty scoop — practice and team work. 
THE SPRINTS, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash- 
impact style and natural stretch stride-synchronizing 
leg and arm action-conditioning exercises-starting 
techniques-slow motion of muscular utilization and 
coordination. 
SHOT PUT, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Fitting styles to physiques — tension control — 
one, two, three rhythm — exercises — finger and hand 
grip — ^finger and wrist snap — foot positions — ^progres- 
sive tension and effort — explosive hip snap. 



YOU ARE CORDIALLY 
INVITED 

WHILE YOU ARE IN LOUISVILLE 

FOR THE 
STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

TO VISIT OUR DISPLAY 

IN THE 

SOUTH ROOM 



OF THE 



SHERWYN HOTEL 

(FORMERLY THE WATTERSON) 



OUR KENTUCKY REPRESENTATIVES 
WILL BE ON HAND TO GREET YOU 



s^UTCLIFFE CO. 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 



KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL STATE 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

March 12 thru March 17, 1963 

While in Louisville for the State Basketball Tourna- 
ment, make our room at the Kentucky Hotel your head- 
quarters, for it is the meeting place for players, coaches 
and basketball fans. Our factory representatives, to- 
gether with our school representatives, Roy J. Boyd, 
Jim Mitchell, Ed Hendley, and C. A. Byrn, Jr. will be 
on hand to make your visit in our room a pleasant one. 

We will have on display our new 1963 Spring and 
Summer samples, as well as an advance showing on 
football and basketball supplies for the coming 1963 
season. We would recommend that you be ready to 
place your order so that there will be no delay from the 
standpoint of delivery. 

Our Spring and Summer catalog was mailed a few 
weeks ago. If you failed to receive your copy, write us 
and we will gladly send you another. 

Remember-two of the basketballs to be used in the 
State Tournament can be secured from us; namely the 
Coach Adolph Rupp No. AFR official ball and the No. 
ARX official LastBilt basketball. Both of these balls 
carry the signature of Coach Adolph Rupp and are used 
by the University of Kentucky Wildcats. Let us ship you 
these basketballs, so that you will have the feel of the 
ball to be used in the State Tournament. 

For those last minute needs for tournament and for 
the last few games before tournament time, please 
let us assist you. 

HUNTS ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 




Hiqh khod AthMe 

Site of the 1963 State Basketball Tournament 




Sixteen fine teams will come to Louisville this year to take part in the State High School Basket- 
ball Tournament, scheduled to be held on March 13-16. Above is a view of the main entrance to 
the Exposition Center and Coliseum of the Kentucky State Fair plant in Jefferson County, where 
the tournament will be played. The approximate seating capacity of Freedom Hall, the basketball 
arena, is 17,000. 





OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MARCH 13B3 




Modern Ides of March 



The gym lights gleam like a beacon beam 

And a million motors hum 
In a good will flight on a Friday night ; 

For basketball beckons, "Come!" 



A sharp-shooting mite is king tonight. 

The Madness of March is running. 
The winged feet fly, the ball sails high 

And field goal hunters are gunning. 



The colors clash as silk suits flash 

And race on a shimmering floor. 

Repressions die, and partisans vie 
In a goal acclaiming roar. 



On Championship Trail toward a holy grail, 
All fans are birds of a feather. 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is full of leather. 



Since time began, the instincts of man 
Prove cave and current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Are relatives under the skin. 



It's festival time, — sans reason or rhyme 
But with nation-wide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides high on an even keel. 



With war nerves tense, the final defense 
Is the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And liberty lingers still. 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arch! 

Let our boys tread where hate is dead, — 
In this happy Madness of March! 

— H. V. Porter. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXV— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1963 



1.00 Per Year 



Survey Concerning Athletics 

An interesting independent research study was 
made recently by Mr. James L. Kennison of Asbury 
College, Assistant Professor in the Division of Physi- 
cal Education. The title of the study was "The 
Relationship of Athletics to the Athlete in Regard 
to Discipline, Scholarship, and Holding Power in 
Selected High Schools of Kentucky, 1962-63." 

In his introductory chapter of the study, Prof. 
Kennison said: 

"The mass population must recognize physical 
education as an integral part of life if that popula- 
tion is to attain proper individual standards of physi- 
cal fitness. Those in the teaching profession who are 
dedicated physical educators need not be 'sold' on 
this fact. Unfortunately, however, millions of fathers 
and mothers in the United States who today care 
for their children in creditable fashion consider 
physical education as a frill or appendage — ^it is too 
often classified as merely 'fun.' 

"The physical education program of today is 
unique in that it offers excellent opportunities for 
contribiitions to the physical, health, emotional, and 
recreational development of the individual child. 
Such opportunities, offered in no other phase of the 
sehool's complex organization, provide a great in- 
centive to physical educators; they must develop 
programs fulfilling those objectives of eduoadon 
which delegate to the program of physical education 
an important and outstanding role. 

"The backbone of the physical education pro- 
gram in the high school is the service program. This 
is the program, required in many schools, providing 
oppoi-tunity to every child for developing funda- 
mental skills ad recreational activities which will 
benefit him in adult life. 

"The well-developed service program will have as 
its result a program of intramural athletics. This 
program provides athletic competition on a higher 
level than is possible in the sei-vice program. In 
such a program, the child, in addition to having fun 
and relaxation, will gain such personal qualities as 
teamwork, sportsmanship, and an appreciation of 
many types of activities. 

"A desirable outgrowth of the intramural pro- 
gram is the program of interscholastic athletics. In 
these activities, those children who are recognized as 
being the best in the various athletic events are 
called upon to represent their schools in athletic 
competition. It is with the latter group this study 
deals." 

Mr. Kennison proposed in his study to determine 
the extent to which the athletic programs in the 
high schools of Kentucky benefit the male athlete in 
regard to discipline, scholarship, and holding power. 
Mr. Kennison assumed that 1.) the schools contact- 
ed would be, because they were a random sampling, 
represenitaitive of the high schools in Kentucky; 2.) 
tihe athletic program in the state of Kentucky is 
operated for the sole benefit of the boy; 3.) the 
aithletic programs in Kentucky high schools play a 



distinct part in the development and education of all 
those who participate in the programs; 4.) a cer- 
tain amount of "athletic aura" was present in most 
schools. He stated that the study is limited by the 
investigation, is limited to one high school per 
inherent limitations of the questionnaire method of 
county in the state of Kentucky, and is limited to 
the male athletes in the schools. 

A questionnaire was prepared consisting of eleven 
questions. Of these eleven, three questions dealt with 
scholarship, three with discipline, and five with 
holding power. Of the 123 questionnaires mailed to 
school principals, a total of fiftyntwo were return- 
ed. The average student body of the participating 
schools was 514, while the average number of ath- 
letes per school was fifty-nine. Prof. Kennison, after 
studying the comj>leted questionnaires, made the fol- 
lowing summaries and conclusions: 

Athletics and Discipline 

"The number of male students expelled from the 
participating schools during the school year was 44. 
Of these, only one was a member of an athletic 
team. 

"Forty-eight per cent of the ipartioipating princi- 
pals felt that their athletes were better disciplined 
than the total student bodies; 46% felt that the 
discipline of their athletes was the same as the 
total student bodies; only a small 6% felt their 
athletes displayed worse discipline than the total 
student bodies. 

"It can be concluded, therefore, that boys partici- 
pating in athletics are, on the whole, better dis- 
ciplined than the average students in the partici- 
pating schools. 

Athletics and Scholarship 

"In comparing the grade point average of all 
graduating seniors of 1962 from the participating 
schools (both male anid female) with the grade 
point average of all athletes in the participating 
school it is found that the athletes have the higher 
average. 

"It can be concluded that the athletes in the par- 
ticipating schools are above average students, run- 
ning slightly ahead of the senior students in the 
schools. 

Athletics and Holding Power 

"Of the 612 male voluntary drop-outs during the 
1961-62 school year reported by the participating 
schools, only 21 were members of athletic teams. 
This was a total dropout average of 11.7 per school 
as compared to .40 per school for athletes. 

"A to'tal of 175 student marriages were reported 
(3.17 marriages per school) and of these 175, only 
13 involved athletes (.25 per school). 

"Ninety-six per cent of the participating princi- 
pals felt that athletics serve as a holding device in 
the schools. 

"It can be concluded that athletics serve as a 
holding device for students in the schools. 
General Conclusion 

"It can be concluded from the data on hand that 
('Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1963 

VOL. xxv-N o^ MAHCH, «« j^ Memoriam 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

Uig:h School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexin^on, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexinsrton. 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexin^on. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georeetown ^■l^kl 

Vice-President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan ^^^^^ 

Directors — Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman 
Gish (1962-63), Greenville; Preston Holland (1961-65), Murray: 
Don R. Rawlinss (1961-65), Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1962- 
66), Louisville; Oran C. Teater (1960-64), Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 



Jtiom the L'Ommissione'i s CJffi 



ice 



REPORTS NOW DUE 

1. 1962-63 Basketball Participation List 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



BOARD ELECTION 

At the copy dea(iline for this issue of 
the ATHLETE, principals in Sections 2 and 
5 were still balloting for Board of Control 
membership. There were three candidates in 
Section 2. They were: Supt. Sherman Gish, 
Muhlenberg County Schools; Supt. J. D. 
Rayburn, Providence Schools; and Prin. W. 
P. Wheeler, Daviess County High School. 
There were also three candidates in Sec- 
tion 5. They were: Ass't. Supt. Don Davis, 
Kenton County Schools; Supt. Eugene Rob- 
inson, Walton-Verona Schools; and Supt. 
Tebay Rose, Carlisle Schools. 

CORRECTION 

Due to an error in tabulating, ratings for the 
Irvine High School in the "Other School Officials" 
and "Crowd" columns, listed in the February issue 
of the ATHLETE were incorrect. The ratings in the 
two categories should have been respectively 24-4-0-0 
and 21-7-0-1. 

FILMING ATHLETIC EVENTS 

The Visual Instruction Bureau of the University 
of Texas announces a new handbook, FILMING 
ATHLETIC EVENTS ($2.50). The publication is a 
distinctive, non-technical 68-page booklet with illus- 
trations for those interested in making motion pic- 
tures and those already engaged in motion picture 
activities. This booklet is of particular interest to 
photographers and coaches. Topics covered include 
pre-season planning, equipment needed, costs of 
equipment and materials, and camera techniques 
used in filming football, basketball, track, baseball, 
and swimming. Illustrated are various techniques 
employed by coaches and contestants in making most 
effective use of films in training. Ways of using 
films for public relations are also shown. The ad- 
dress of the Visual Instructions Bureau is P. O. 
Box 8032, University Station, Austin 12, Texas. 




C. G. Sherrell 

C. G. Sherrell, 38, basketball coach of 
the Madisonville High School, died of a 
heart attack at his home on December 29, 
1962. 

Mr. Sherrell was born in Allen County 
near Scottsville. He was a graduate of the 
Glasgow High School and Western Ken- 
tucky State College, receiving his M.A. de- 
gree from Western two years ago. He serv- 
ed in the U. S. Army from 1943 to 1945. 
Before icominlg to Madisonville he coached 
at the Dixon High School for four years, 
taking one team to the State Tournament. 
He coached at the Providence High School 
for two years. He had an excellent record 
as Freshman football coaoh at Madisonville, 
and he did an outstanding job as football 
scout. He had also coached baseball, golf, 
and tennis at times when these sports were 
short of coaches. 

Coach Sherrell had been at Madisonville 
as basketball coateih since 1956. He had only 
one losing season there, his first. His best 
season was 1959-60 with a regular season 
record of 25-1. 

Surviving Mr. Sherrell are his wife, Mrs. 
Margaret Sherrell; a son, Stuart, six years 
old ; his mother, Mrs. Lois Sherrell of Glas- 
gow; and two sisters. He was a member of 
the First Methodist Church of Madisonville. 

On January 29, 1963, receipts from 
Madisonville's home game with Central 
City went into a C. G. Sherrell Memorial 
Education Fund for young Stuart, to insure 
the boy a college education. A fellow coach 
on the Madisonville staff said about Mr. 
Sherrell: "Coach Sherrell was a patient, 
dedicated coach who was more than willing 
to give of himself in order to produce a 
winninig team. Basketball at M. H. S. under 
coach Sherrell was greatly elevated and he 
left an imprint on M.H.S. sports that will 
be remembered for many years." 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1963 



Page Three 



SPRING MEETS 

Tentative dates have been set for the 
various spring meets and tournaments in 
rifle marksmanship, baseball, golf, track, 
and tennis. They are as follows: 

April 27, State Rifle Championship, M. 
M. I. 

May 3-4, regional tennis tournaments 
for girls (Murray, Bowling Green, Louis- 
ville, Jefferson County, Bellevue, Lexing- 
ton) 

May 6, regional tennis tournaments for 
boys (Bowling Green, Fort Knox, West 
Jefferson County, East Jefferson County, 
Louisville, Bellevue, Lexington, Richmond) 

May 7-9, district baseball tournaments 
(listing (given below) 

May 10-11, State Tennis Tournament 
for Girls, Louisville 

May 10-11, regional track meets (Mur- 
ray, Daviess County, Bowling Green, Fort 
Knox, Jefferson County, Louisville, Belle- 
vue, Lexington, Danville, Barbourville, Elk- 
horn City, Ashland) 

May 13-14 State Tennis Tournament for 
Boys,, Bellevue 

May 15, regional golf tournaments 
(Princeton, Bowling Green, Jefferson Coun- 
ty, Louisville, Covington, Lexington, Somer- 
set, Paintsville) 

May 17-18, State Track Meet, Lexington 

May 21-22, State Golf Tournament, Fort 
Knox 

May 23-24, regional baseball tourna- 
ments (Murray, Owensboro, Bowling Green, 
Louisville, Newport, Lexington, Middles- 
borough, Ashland) 

June 5-6, State Baseball Tournament, 
Lexington 

In assigning schools to districts and 
regions for spring meets, the source of in- 
formation is the blue statement form filed 
by the school principal when he enrolls his 
school in the Association. If a coach is list- 
ed for a sport, it is assumed that the school 
sponsors a team in that sport. In some in- 
stances the coach of a particular sport may 
not have been assigned at the time the 
statement form was filed, and in other in- 
stances the principal may have decided that 
a sport for which a coach was named vdll 
not be sponsored by the school this year. 

Principals should study the assignment 
of schools by districts and regions which 
appears below to determine whether or not 
the listings for their schools are correct. 
The State Office should be notified only if 
the name of the school should be added to 
or omitted from any of the lists given. 
RIFLE MARKSMANSHIP 

Ashland, Boone County, Bryan Station, Danville, 



Foundation, K. M. I., Male, M. M. I, Morgan Coun- 
ty, Owensboro, St. Joseph Prep. (Bardstown), Somer- 
set, Western (Sinai) 

TENNIS FOR GIRLS 

Murray Regdon-Fort Campbell, Henderson, Hen- 
derson County, Hopkinsville, MadisonviUe, Murray, 
Providence, St. Mary's 

Bowling Green Region — Bowling Green, Cavema, 
College, Fort Knox, Greensburg, LaRue County, 
Owensboro, St. Mary-of-the-Woods, Warren County 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Central, Manual, 
Male, Presentation, Shawnee 

Jefferson County Region — Butler, Durrett, East- 
em, Fairdale, Fern Creek, Southern, Waggener 

Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone 
County, Dayton, Highlands 

Lexington Region — Foundation, Franklin County, 
Harrodsburg, Hazel Green, (East Bernstadt), Shel- 
byville, Somerset, University 

TENNIS FOR BOYS 

Bowhng Green Region — Bowling Green, Cavema, 
College, Fort Campbell, Franklin-Simpson, Glasgow, 
High Street, Hopkinsville, MadisonviUe, Providence, 
Russellville, St. Mary's, Warren County 

Fort Knox Region — Fort Knox, Greensburg, Hen- 
derson County, LaRue County, Owensboro, St. Joseph 
(Bardstown), St. Mary-of-the-Woods, West Hardin 

West Jefferson County Region — Bishop David, 
Butler, Fairdale, Pleasm-e Ridge Park, Southern, 
Valley, Western 

East Jefferson County Region — Aquinas, Durrett, 
Eastern, Fern Creek, K. M. I., Louisville Country 
Day, Seneca, Trinity, Waggener 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Central, DeSales, 
Flaget, Shawnee, St. Xavier 

BeUevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone 
County, Covington Catholic, Dayton, Highlands, 
Holmes, Lloyd, Newport Catholic 

Lexington Region — Franklin County, Lafayette, 
Harrodsburg, M. M. I., Shelbyville, University 

Riclimond Region — Ashland, Danville, Founda- 
tion, Hazel Green (East Bernstadt), Harlan, Somer- 
set, Whitesburg 

BASEBALL 
Murray Region 

Christian County District — Attucks, Christian 
County, Dawson Spiings, Fort Campbell, Hopkins- 
ville, Trigg County 

Murray District — Benton, Calloway County, Mur- 
ray, Murray College, North Marshall, South Mar- 
shall 

Reidland District — Ballard, Heath, Lone Oak, 
Reidland, St. John, Tilghman 

Mayfield District — Carlisle County, Fancy Farm, 
Fulton County, Fulton, Hickman County, Mayfield, 
Wingo 

Caldwell County District — Caldwell County, Crit- 
tenden County, Livingston Central Lyon Coiuity 
Owensboro Region 

Henderson County District — Henderson, Hender- 
son County, Morganfield, St. Vincent, Sturgis 

Hancock County District — Breckinridge County, 
Flaherty, Irvington, Hancock County, Meade County 

Hartford District — Beaver Dam, Centertown, 
Fordsville, Hartford 

Daviess County Disitrict — Daviess County, Owens- 
boro, Owensboro Catholic, St. Mary-of-the-Woods 

MadisonviUe District — Bremen, Calhoun, Dixon, 
Earlington, Hanson, Livermore, MadisonviUe, Provi- 
dence, Rosenwald (MadisonviUe), Sacramento, Slaugh- 
ters, Souith Hopkins, West Hopkins 

Hughes Kirk District — ^Central City, Drakesboro, 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1963 



Drakesboi'o Community, Greenville, Hughes Kirk 
Bowling Green Region 

Warren County District — Alvaton, Bowling Green, 
Bristow, College, Franklin-Simpson, High Street, 
Lincoln (Franklin), North Warren, St. Joseph (Bow- 
ling Green), Warren County 

Auburn District — Adaii-ville, Auburn, Clifty, Guth- 
rie, Lewisburg, Russellville, Todd County, Todd 
County Training 

Glasgow District — Allen County, Austin Tracy, 
Bunche, Gamaliel, Glasgow, Hiseville, Metcalfe Coun- 
ty, Park City, Scottsville, Temple Hill, To-mpkinsville 

Cavema District — Caverna, Cub Run, LaRue 
County, Memorial (Hardyville), Munfordville 

Leitehfield District — Butler County, Caneyville, 
Clarkson, Edmonson County, Leitehfield 

Campbellsville District — Adair County, Campbells- 
ville, Greensburg, Lebanon, St. Augustine, St. Charl- 
es, Taylor County 

St. Joseph Disitrict — Bardstown, Bloomfield, Fred- 
'ericktown, Mackville, Lebanon Junction, Mt. Wash- 
ington, St. Joseph (Bardstown), Shepherdsville, 
Springfield, Willisburg 

North Hardin District — East Hardin, Elizabeth- 
town, Elizabethtown Catholic, Fort Knox, North 
Hardin, West Hardin 

Louisville Region 

St. Xavier District — Central, Flaget, Shawnee, St. 
Xavier 

Southern District — Bishop David, Butler, Fair- 
dale, Pleasure Ridge Park, Southern, VaUey, West- 
em 

Atherton District — Atherton, DeSales, Male, 
Manual 

Trinity District — Aquinas, Durrett, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, K. M. L, Louisville Country Day, Seneca, 
Trinity, Waggener, Westport 

Newport Region 

St. Henry District — Boone County, Dixie Heights, 
Lloyd, St. Henry, Simon Kenton 

Ludlow District — Beechwood, Covington C!atholic, 
Holmes, Holy Cross, Ludlow 

Silver Grove District — Campbell County, High- 
lands, Silver Grove, St. Thomas 

Falmouth District — Bracken County, Falmouth, 
Grant County, Pendleton, Walton-Verona, WUliams- 
town 

Newport District — Bellevue, Dayton, Newport, 
Newport Catholic 

ToUesboro District — Fleming County, Lewis Coun- 
ty, Mason County, Maysville, ToUesboro 
Lexington Region 

Versailles District — Anderson, Frankfort, Frank- 
lin County, Georgetown, Scott County, Versailles 

Paris District — Bourbon County, Carlisle, Harri- 
son County, M. M. I., Nicholas County, North 
MiddletowTi, Paris 

Lancaster District — Buckeye, Camp Dick Robin- 
son, Danville, Harrodsburg, Jessamine County, Junc- 
tion City, Lancaster, Mercer County, Paint Lick, 
Perryville 

Shelbyville District — ^Lincoln Institute, Oldham 
County, Shelby County, Shelbyville, Taylorsville 

Liberty District — Crab Orchard, Liberty, Lincoln 
(Stanford), McKinney, Memorial (Waynesburg), 
Middleburg, Mt. Vernon, Stanford 

Carrollton District — Carrollton, Eminence, Galla- 
tin County, Henry County, Owen County, Trimble 
County 

Lexington District — Bryan Station, Douglass 
(Lexington), Henry Clay, Lafayette, Lexington 
CathoHc, Sayre University 



Richmond District — Berea, Estill County, Madi- 
son, Madison Central, Model 

Middlesborough Region 

Somerset District — Burnside, Ferguson, McCreary 
County, Pulaski County, Russell County, Somerset 

Hazel Green District — ^Bush, Hazel Green, Clay 
County, Lily, London 

Lynch District — ^Cumberland, East Main, Evarts, 
Harlan, Loyall 

Lee County District — Jackson, Lee County, Mc- 
Kee, Oneida, Powell County, Riverside Christian, 
Wolfe County 

Middlesborough District — Bell County, Henderson 
Settlement, Lone Jack, Middlesborough, Red Bird 

Elkhom City District— Belfry, Elkhorn City, 
Fleming-Neon, Jenkins, Johns Creek, Phelps, Pike- 
ville, Virgie 

M. C. Napier District — ^Buckhom, Dike Comibs, 
Hazard, Hindman, Leathei-wood, Letcher, Leslie 
County, M. C. Napier, Whitesburg 

Ashland Region 

Ashland District — Ashland, Boyd County, Cat- 
lettsburg, Faii-view, Louisa 

South Portsmouth District — Greenup, McKell, 
Russell, South Portsmouth, Wurtland 

Camargo District — DuBois, Camargo, Clark Coun- 
ty, Montgomery County, Owingsville, Sharpsburg 

Grayson District — Breckinridge Training, Olive 
Hill, Prichard, Rowan County 

Paintsville District — Blaine, Ezel, Inez, Meade 
Memorial, Morgan County, Oil Springs, Paintsville, 
Van Lear 

McDowell District — Dorton, McDowell, Martin, 
Maytown, Prestonsburg, Wheelwright 
TRACK 

Murray Region — Attucks, Ballard, Caldwell Coun- 
ty, Christian County, Fort Campbell, Pulton, Heath, 
Hopkinsville, Mayfield, Murray, Murray College, 
Tilghman, Trigg County 

Daviess County Region — Bremen, Calhoun, Crit- 
tenden County, Daviess Coimty, Douglass (Hender- 
son), Hancock County, Henderson, Henderson Coun- 
ty, Holy Name, Madisonville, Morganfield, Owens- 
boro, Owensboro Catholic, Providence, Slaughters, St. 
Mary-of-the-Woods 

Bowling Green Region — Alvaton, Austin Tracy, 
Bowling Green, Bristow, Bunche, College, Franklin- 
Simpson, Gamaliel, Glasgow, Greenville, High Street, 
Hiseville, Lincoln (Franklin), Metcalfe County, Park 
"jty, Russellville, Temple Hill, Tompkinsville, War- 
ren County 

Fort Knox Region — Breckinridge County, Camp- 
bellsville, Durham, East Hardin, Elizabethtown, Fort 
Knox, Greensburg, LaRue County, Meade County, 
Mt. Washington, Taylor County, West Hardin 

Jefferson County Region — Aquinas, Bishop David, 
Butler, Durrett, Eastern, Fairdale, Fern Creek, K. M. 
I., Lincoln Institute, Louisville Country Day, Old- 
ham County, Pleasure Ridge Park, Seneca, Southern, 
Trinity, Valley, Waggener, Western (Shively), West- 
port 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Central, DeSales, 
duPont Manual, Flaget, Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee 

Lexington Region — Anderson, Bourbon County, 
Bryan Station, Carlisle, Clark County, DuBois, Dun- 
bar, Fleming County, Foundation, Frankfort, Frank- 
lin County, Georgetown, Good Shepherd, Harrods- 
burg, Henry Clay, Jessamine County, Lafayette, 
Lexington Catholic, Madison, Madison Central, M. 
M. I., Montgomery County, Mt. Sterling, Paris, 
Sayre, Scott County, Shelby County, Shelbyville, 
University, Versailles 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1963 



Page Five 



Bellevue Region — Beechwood, Bellevue, Boone 
County, Camipbell County, Covington Catholic, Dixie 
Heights, Grant County, Highlands, Holmes, Lloyd, 
iLudlow, Maysville, Newport, Newport Catholic, 
Simon-Kenton 

Danville Region — ^Bards'town, Bate, Bloomfield, 
Danville, Old Kentucky Home, Parksville, St. Cath- 
erine, St. Charles, St. Joseph (Bardstown), Spring- 
field 

Barbourville Region — Barbourville, Bell County, 
Bush, Clay Coimty, Corbin, Cumberland, Evarts, Hall, 
Harlan, Hazel Green, Knox Central, lily, London, 
Lone Jack, Lynn Camp, McCreary County, Middles- 
borough, Pineville, Pulaski County, Rosenwald (Har- 
lan), Shopville, Somerset, Wallins, West Main, Wil- 
liamsburg 

Elkhorn City Region — Belfry, Buckhom, Dike 
Combs, Dorton, Dunham, Elkhorn City, Fleming- 
Neon, Hazard, Jenkins, John's Creek, Martin, M. C. 
Napier, Painitsville, Pikeville, Prestonsburg, Virgie, 
Whitesifaurg 

Ashland Region — Ashland, Boyd County, Catletts- 
burg, Flat Gap, Greenup, Louisa, Morgan County, 
Oil Springs, Raceland, Russell, Warfield, Wurtland 

GOLF 

Princeton Region — Caldwell County, Daviess Coun- 
ty, Fulton, Fort Campbell, Greenville, Henderson 
County, Hopkinsville, Madisonville, Murray, North 
Marshall, Owensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Provi- 
dence 

Bowling Green Region — Adair County, Bowling 
Green, Breckinridge County, Campbellsville, College, 
Eliaabd;htown, Fort Knox, Franklin-Simpson, Glas- 
gow, Hartford, High Street, LaRue County, Meade 
County, Russellville, St. Joseph (Bardstown), St. 
Joseph (Bowling Green), Scottsville, Tompkinsville, 
Warren County 

Louisville Region — ^Atherton, DeSales, duPont 
Manual, Flaget, Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee 

Jefferson County Region — Aquinas, Bishop David, 
Butler, Durrertt, Eastern, Fern Creek, K.M.L, Louis- 
ville Country Day, Pleasure Ridge Park, Oldham 
County, Seneca, Shelbyville, Southern, Trinity, Val- 
ley, Waggener, Western (Shively) 

Lexington Region — Clark County, Danville, Frank- 
fort, Franklin County, Foundation, Henry Clay, 
Lafayette, Lebanon, Mt. Sterling, Madison, Mason 
County, Maysville, Springfield, University, Versaill- 
es 

Somerset Region — ^C o r b i n , Cumberland, East 
Main, Hall, London, McCreary County, Middles- 
borough, Somerset 

Covington Region — Beechwood, Covington Caitho- 
Mc, Dixie Heights, Highlands, Holmes, Holy Cross, 
Lloyd, Newport, Newport Catholic, St. Henry, Silver 
Grove, Williamstown 

Paintsville Region — Ashland, Boyd County, Breck- 
inridge Training, Fairview, Hazard, Martin, Paints- 
ville, Pikefville, Presitonsburg, Wheelwright, Wurt- 
land 



HOSPITALITY COMMITTEE 

The following events and functions of 
the Hospitality Committee in connection 
with the State High School Basketball 
Tournament will be of interest to tourna- 
ment visitors: 



A DANCE will be held in the Flag Room 
of the Kentucky Hotel on Thursday night, 
March 14, from 10:30 p.m. to 1:00 a.m. The 
admission price is $1.00 per couple or in- 
dividual. 

MOVIE — A special showing at the Ken- 
tucky Theatre on Friday, March 15 at 11:00 
p.m., has been arranged. The price per 
ticket is 50c as long as the students have 
their identification cards. The picture will 
be "To Kill a Mocking Bird," from the 
Pultizer-Prize Winning Novel, and there are 
1,128 seats. 

RECREATION CENTER, West Wing of 
Fairgrounds. There will be free basketball, 
tennis, etc., daily; also free golf at all City 
of Louisville golf courses daily. 

INFORMATION CENTER— Desks will 
be set up and manned at both the Kentucky 
Hotel and the Farigrounds. 

HOSPITALITY ROOM at Freedom Hall 
for coaches, referees, school principals and 
officials will be opened daily, 30-minutes 
before game time. All who will be eligible 
to enjoy the Hospitality Room should come 
prepared with their identification cards 
from the various associaions, etc., as two 
uniformed attendants will be on duty at the 
door to expedite admittance to the room. 

PRACTICE ACCOMMODATIONS FOR 
TEAMS — Principals or coaches desiring 
practice accommodations may phone Louis- 
ville Male High School, 582-2613, and make 
arrangements for the use of these gyms. 
Contact Foster Sanders, Principal. 

STUDENT IDENTIFICATION BADG- 
ES — ^All students, in order to participate in 
this program and to be given advantages of 
che special prices, must have identification 
badges. These are to be picked up at the 
Information Desk at the Fairgrounds Coli- 
seum. 

TRANSPORTATION — Cabs displaying 
signs will charge a flat rate to the Fair- 
grounds from the hotel district as they did 
at the previous Tournament. Buses will be 
identified with signs and will give special 
attention to service from downtown to the 
Fairgrounds at regular rates. 

PARKING OF SCHOOL BUSES at the 
Fairgrounds has been handled at the rate 
of 25c per bus. It has been requested by the 
police that, in order to handle buses ex- 
peditiously and to place them all in a special 
parking area, they use the same Gate No. 2, 
off Crittenden Drive, as will be used by 
Tournament Officials. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1963 



The Flying Dutchman 

The Kentucky High School Basketball 
Tournaments produce keen competition. 
There will be many schoolboy competitors 
who wiU "bleed inwardly" but show manly 
and sportsmanlike attitudes as their teams 
are eliminated. Such competitors justify 
Kentucky's reputation for sportsmanship in 
its high school sports program. 

Try the following on for "Sportsman- 
ship Size": On the final lap of the 400-yard 
Free Style, swimmer Hariy Tuton of Wag- 
gener High School collapsed in the water 
with stomach cramps. Mike Hock of the 
St. Xavier School might have gone on to 
win this event, but he elected to tow Harry 
to the edge of the pool where he was re- 
vived. 

At Tournament time The Dutchman al- 
ways remembers the sportsmanship and 
leadership displayed by a great kid who 
carried the name "Speedy" Moreman proud- 
ly until he died a hero's death in World War 
n. Everybody now knows how "Speedy" 
stopped a menacing crowd and sent them 
back into the stands with the words, "The 
kids on this team are ashamed of you." 

"Speedy's" story was carried in a na- 
tional magazine article and now the Dutch- 
man has a letter from Dr. James Neal of 
Florida saying, "I played on that team with 
"Speedy" and how well I remember how 
that kid taught sportsmanship to the 
crowd." Yesterday, a letter came from a 
lady who was there when it happened and 
part of her letter says, "I was married to 
"Speedy" Moreman until he was killed in 
Germany in World War H" — Sportsmanlike 
acts immortalize the individual. 

From John B. Mueller, Sports Editor, 
The Midland News, Midland, Pennt-sylvania, 
comes the word that The Flying Dutchman 
program is being introduced in "The Land 
of The Quakers." Because Pennsylvania is 
a coal and steel state, the counterpart to 
the Com Cob Pipe of Honor will be the 
"Keystoners' Stainless Award of Honor." 
Midland is the home of a large stainless 
steel plant. 

The Com Cob Pipe of Honor Award 




THE DUTCHMAN 

winner for this month is Doran Hostettler 
of Lost Creek. Basketball Official Marvin 
Meadows, who hails from Clayhole, recom- 
mended the Riverside Christian Training 
Coach. According to Marvin, Coach Hostett- 
ler is truly an unselfish Kentuckian. 

Doran wants every youngster to get to 
play ball so he organized independent lea- 
gues, taking care of more than 100 (one 
hundred) little basketball hopefuls. To do 
this, he had to sei-ve as janitor, as well as 
coach and organizer. In the summer, he gets 
the baseball leagues going in the same man- 
ner. For this unselfish service beyond the 
"call of duty" a Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
now adorns Coach Hostettler's trophy shelf. 

J. W. "Rabbit" Smith has been delegat- 
ed by the authorities of Harrison County to 
launch an "Improvement Campaign of rec- 
reational facilities and program in Cynthi- 
ana and Harrison County. As one County 
joins another in carrying on sports and rec- 
reation after the close of the school year, 
it is evident that the program of the K. H. 
S. A. A. is being carried over into whole- 
some yearround programs of recreation. 
This is good for the people of Kentucky. 

Look the Dutchman up when you are in 
Louisville. Let's hear your ideas on the 
rules for 1963-64! The National Rules Com- 
mittee meets in Louisville on March 25 and 
26, 1963. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled March D 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise desiemated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Butler, Donald A., 2966 Chippewa Drive, Owensboro, MU 3-3176, 

MU 4-1451 
Canady, Ray B., 227 Sycamore, Barbourville. 546-3501 
Cathera, Bob, 509 17th St., Corbin, 1338, 452 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1963 



Page Seven 



KAPOS News 

Sportsmanship Week 

In a letter sent to K.H.S.A.i^. principals 
and cheerleaders sponsors on February 8, 
1963, KAPOS announced that Governor 
Bert Combs would declare the week of Feb- 
ruary 25-March 2 "Sportsmanship Week." 
The following suggestions were offered the 
school representatives: "(1) Arrange for 
radio talks on good sportsmanship by cheer- 
leaders, school heads, or sponsors ; (2) Ar- 
range for T.V. appearance and talks by 
coaches, team captains, and cheerleaders ; 
(3) Write articles for the sports and editorial 
sections of your newspapers ; (4) Plan con- 
vocation programs at school; (5) Arrange 
talks before civic groups by athletes and 
ministers; (6) Enter the KAPOS poster con- 
test; (7) Have pictures made of sponsors, 
discussing sportsmanship; (8) Post slogans 
cheerleaders, principal and superintendent 
and posters in the halls and bulletin boards 
at S'Ohool." 

Poster Contest 

In the letter mentioned an announcement 
was also made concerning the KAPOS poster 
contest. The following instructions were giv- 
en: "Any school can enter the poster con- 
test. Make an attractive poster on any phase 
of spiortsmanship, using any medium desir- 
ed. Select the best poster from your school, 
place the name of your school and the spon- 
sor's name and address on the lower right 
hand corner of the back of the poster. Mail 
the entry to KAPOS, in care of Kentucky 
Hotel, Louisville, Kentucky, so it can be 
judged and displayed during the State Tour- 
nament. Use regular white construction 
paper — 18" x 24". Four prizes will be given : 
First prize, $25.00, Second prize, $15.00, 
Third prize, $10.00 and Fourth prize, $5.00. 

Dates To Remember 

KAPOS Coffee— Saturday, March 16, 
Kentucky Hotel. 

Summer Four-Day Cheerleader Clinic — 
Moved from Camp Daniel Boone to the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky Campus, August 7-11. 
This is the week of the All-Star Games ! 

Fall One-Day Clinic — November 9, Uni- 
versity of Kentucky Campus. 

State Tournament Plans 

As cheerleader sponsors and cheerleaders 
come into the lobby of the Kentucky Hotel, 
they will be met by a bevy of attractive 
cheerleaders. The visitors will be escorted to 
the KAPOS booth where they will be regis- 
tered and given name tags and handbooks. A 
second Welcome Booth will be set up in Free- 
dom Hall on the level of the playing court. 



This booth will be manned by officers and 
board members of KAPOS. 

Cheerleader sponsors who would like to 
have a part in making known to the public 
just what is involved in their work may be 
used for radio interviews or possibly a tele- 
vision program. Sponsors willing to assist in 
this program should leave their names and 
Louisville addresses at the booth. KAPOS 
board members are especially anxious to use 
for radio broadcast those sponsors whose 
teams are participating in the tournament. 
These board members will have rooms at the 
Kentucky Hotel on the same floor where the 
cheerleaders will be. Sponsors are encourag- 
ed to call on them for any services which 
they may render. They are there primarily 
to evaluate cheerleaders, but they will not 
be too busy to help with problems. 
Principals Must Send Confirmation 

Each principal whose school is partici- 
pating as one of the sixteen teams in the 
state tournament will receive a letter from 
the Kentucky Association of Cheerleader 
Sponsors. The letter will contain the infor- 
mation concerning the basis of selecting out- 
standing cheerleader squads, and will re- 
quest that the principal send, either by wire 
or special delivery, confirmation that the 
cheerleaders of his school are being chaper- 
oned by a well qualified, school-approved 
adult. The name of the sponsor should be 
included in this confirmation letter. Send 
confirmation to: President Ruth Spurlock 
(KAPOS), Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, Ken- 
tucky. 

The Cheerleader selections will be made 
on the following basis: 

1. Appearance (This includes neatness 
and general good grooming. Girls are urged 
not to wear blue jeans or other trousers with 
their school sweaters.) 

2. Ability to execute the yells. 

.3. Ability and effort displayed in con- 
trol over own rooters 

4. Appropriateness of the choice and 
time to yell (Delaying the game will result 
in a low grade.) 

5. Conduct in and out of uniform (No 
gum chewing, smoking, using intoxicants or 
profane language, wandering around the 
the hotel corridors after midnight and ap- 
pearing in corridors in hair curlers, etc.) 

6. Pep and enthusiasm displayed during 
cheering 

7. Sportsmanship (toward opponents and 
officials) 

Method of GRADING, based on a poss- 
ible 70 point total, is as follows: Excellent, 
10 pts. ; Good, 7 pts. ; Fair, 5 pts. ; Poor, 2 pts. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1963 



Saturday Morning Coffee 

ElAPOS extends a cordial invitation for 
ALL sponsors and cheerleaders to join them 
for coffee and sweet rolls on Saturday morn- 
ing from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. at the Kentucky 
Hotel. 

Summer Four-Day Cheerleader Clinic 

The Kentucky Cheerleader Association 
announces the Third Annual Summer Cheer- 
leader Clinic. The clinic will be held the week 
of the All-Star Games, August 7-11, Uni- 
versity of Kentucky Campus. Brochures can 
be obtained at the KAPOS booth or by con- 
tacting: Mrs. Grace Fragstein, Mrs. Milly 
Rodes, or Mrs. Stella S. Gild. 




Dr. R. E. Davis Honored 

Dr. Richard E. Davis, Chairman of the 
School Health Committee of the Kentucky 
State Medical Association, was recently nam- 
ed Central City Man of the Year during the 
annual presentation made by the Central 
City Messenger and Times-Argus. Dr. Davis 
is pictured above, right, as he receives con- 
gratulations from Central City Chamber of 
Commerce President Barrett Green. 

The committee which named Dr. Davis 
as the Man of the Year placed emphasis on 
his work in the field of prevention and cure 
of athletic injuries. In Kentucky he has 
pioneered much of the medical work in this 
field. For a number of years he has served 
as the unpaid team doctor for Central City 
High School, and he has provided free medi- 
cal service to several other teams in the area. 

As chairman of the School Health Com- 
mittee, Dr. Davis helped to organize several 
athletic injury prevention conferences dur- 
ing the fall of 1962, these meetings being 
sponsored jointly by the Kentucky State 
Medical Association and the K.H.S.A.A., and 
he was a panel member at most of the meet- 
ings. Recently Dr. Davis flew his own plane, 
accompanied by Central City Coach Jackie 
Day, to Denver to take part in a medical con- 
vention. 



1963 TRACK AND FIELD RULES 

The principal rules revisions authorized 
by the Track and Field Committee, effec- 
tive for the 1963 season, are included in the 
new edition of the Track and Field Rules 
and Records Book. They are as follows: 

RULE 2-2: Contestants may be plac- 
ed in lanes on the basis of drawing by lot 
if the race is run around one or more curv- 
es. 

RULE 2-3: Applications for state and 
national records must be received by the 
Rules and Records Commttee vdthin six 
months after the date of performance. 

RULE 3-11 : Timepieces must be cali- 
brated so that at least one-tenth (1/10) of 
a second is measurable. 

RULE 5-2 : An expansion of this sec- 
tion provides the procedure to be followed 
to detemiine how places and points shall be 
awarded when there is a tie in a field event. 

RULE 8-4: The baton-passing zone is 
22 yards in length. 

RULE 9-1 : Any contestant who does 
not complete all his preliminary attempts 
within the time specified will forfeit any 
remaining preliminary trials. 

A contestant shall be charged with an 
attempt if he does not complete his trial 
within two minutes after he is called. 

RULE 9-2: Fiber glass or other hard 
surfaced material, as well as concrete, 
metal and wood, may be used for a pole 
vault planting pit. 

RULE 9-4: An added note (2) permits 
placing an 8-inch strip of firm resilient 
material against the edge of the take-off 
board farthest from the scratch line when 
an 8-inch joist is used. 

RULE 9-5: If the shot is made of 
metal, it must not be softer than brass, 
thereby making a lead shot illegal. The rub- 
ber or plastic^covered shot with a center 
of buck shot is now legal. 

RULE 9-5: The shot must be put so 
that it falls within a sector marked on the 
ground. 

RULE 9-7: Specifications for the jave- 
lin have been slightly revised. 

RULE 11-6: Cross Country: The fin- 
ish line shall be placed at the entrance of 
the funnel which leads to the chute. 

Situation Ruling 20S: It is not neces- 
sary for a runner to assume the customary 
"Set" position prior to a start. 

Situation Ruling 40S: Hurdles may 
have one or more horizontal bars. 

Situation Ruling 63S: A competitor 
does not make a trial if, after taking a posi- 
tion in the circle, he places the shot on the 
ring surface. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1963 



Page Nine 



Supplement : All tables have been 
broug'ht up^to-date and results for the 1962 
finals are included. 

RULES BOOK CORRECTIONS 

Page 14: Rule 5, Section 2: Delete, in 
the second line, first paragraph of this sec- 
tion, the words "either" and "or field." The 
corrected first sentence of the section 
should correctly read, "Section 2. If there is 
a TIE by two or more competitors for any 
place which scores in a track event, the 
points shall be divided equally between the 
tying competitors and the prizezs shall be 
awarded by lot." The sections' second para- 
graph is applicable to "a tie in a field event 
only and not to a track event." 

Supplemental Diagram : Quarter - mile 
Track: Relay exchange stations are 11 
yards each on each side of the exchange 
mark. The baton passing zone is a total of 
22 YARDS IN LENGTH. 



SURVEY CONCERNING ATHLETICS 

(Conitinued from Page One) 
the athletic programs as provided by the schools of 
Kentucky are beneficial in the following ways: (1) 
Encourage better than average discipline; (2) Pro- 
duce above average scholars; (3) Serve as a holding 
device for students." 

One critic, quoted in a sports column of a state 
newspaper, thought that not much objectivity was 
involved in Mr. Kennison's survey. He said: 

"There were a few figures quoted. One principal 
stated that of forty-four expulsions, only one was 
an athlete. What does this mean? Did it mean that 
principials so value their athletes that they don't 
expel them readily? Or does it mean that athletes 
make up only one 44th of the student body? 

"Another figure said that of 612 male dropouts, 
only twenty-one were athletes. That's interesting. 
Does it mean that athletes are subsidized, and don't 
have to drop out? Is it that they are automatically 
given passing grades, and don't have to drop out? 
Or does it mean something else?" 

This critic also complained that a part of the 
questionnaire included information passed on the 
opinions of the principals involved. 

Mr. Kennison was given an opportunity to reply 
to the critic. He said: 

"I asked for the opinions of the principals with 
the assumption that the experience of these princi- 
pals would give them definite opinions. 

"The study was made to evaluate the benefits or 
detriments derived from the athletic programs. An 
investigator always takes a chance when he starts 
a research problem that the results of the data will 
show his basic assumption to be wrong. In tliis case, 
my assumption that athletics play a distinct part 
in the development and education of those who par- 
ticipate was proven to be time. Had it been proven 
false I would have reported it in the same manner. 

"I bent over backward to see that the study was 
not slanted. First, I sent the questionnaire to the 
principals, not the coaches. Second, the grade-point 
averages of athletes was compared not with the 
grade averages of other boys in the school, but with 
the averages of the 1962 graduating seniors, both 
male and female. 



In answering- Mr. who had asked for con- 
crete facts, not what principals think or feel, Mr. 
Kennison gave the statistics on expulsions of stu- 
dents, grade-point averages of athletes compared 
with graduating seniors, dropoiiits, and marriages in- 
volving athletes and non-athletes, mentioned prev- 
iously in this ai-ticle. He concluded by saying: "As 
I said, I required no lie-deteotor tests. Neither did 
I ask for character references for any principal. I 
re-spect the opinions of the principals. I feel their 
long experience in dealing with our children makes 
their opinions fair, impartial, and very valuable 
to all of us." 



NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from February Issue) 
QUESTIONNAIRE RESULTS which were receiv- 
ed from all sections of the country indicated a very 
high degi'ee of satisfaction with the changes which 
were authorized for the 1962 season. The provision 
requiring each player to wear a tooth and mouth pro- 
tector was endorsed by a vote of more than 4 to 1. 
Specifically, 5, 347 returns found the tooth and mouth 
protector requirement satisfactory, with only 1,518 
indioatinig dissatisfaction. The check-up indicated that 
limiting officials' time-outs for repair of equipment 
to 25 seconds was ovei-whelmingly supported. Approx- 
imately 80% favored the provision. A majority of 
6,588 favored the chance which required that penalties 
for fouls by the offense during the last timed down 
of the 1st and 3rd period be measured before the 
change of goal. Only 235 opposed this change. The 
adoption of the provision which prohibits the blocker 
from swinging, throwing or whipping his elbow or 
forearm into his opponent was favored by 88% of 
those returning questionnaires. Only a slightly smaller 
percentage indicated approval of the provision which 
requires a player on defense who uses his hand or 
arm against an opponent to have his hand in ad- 
vance of the elbow at the time of contact. At least 
83% of the returnees supported each of the five 
principal revisions in the 1962 rules. This was consid- 
ered a whioleheai'ted endorsement of the action taken 
by the Committee at its 1962 meeting. 

Part II of the Questionnaire, which traditionally is 
based upon OBSERVATION, gives evidence that 
athletic administrators, coaches and officials are 
very seriously concerned with several phases of the 
game. While this part of the Questionnaire is based 
entirely upon observation and therefore there are no 
statistics nor supporting evidence presented relative 
to these items, the Committee considers a matter 
serious when 1/3 or more of the respondents check a 
particular item. 36% indicated that piling-on was a 
problem. 1,771 replied that officials were not signaling 
plainly. A comparable number of returns reported 
that the use of hands during offensive blocking often 
wa.s not penalized. It was the consensus that all too 
often officials failed to properly spot the ball and give 
the ready-fornplay signal after the ball has become 
dead. Of the six items which were listed as major 
problems, four had a direct relationship to the effic- 
iency of game officials. These foui- phases of the 
game are entirely within the control of the official and 
it is virtually unanimously agreed that, with the pi-op- 
er and consistent application of the rales, piling on 
and illegal use of hands during offensive blocking 
would soon cease to be a problem. If the officials 
carry out their duties as directed and inatruoted, the 
signaling will be adequate. Two items in Part II, 
namely, face protector contributing to injury of 
wearer and face protector contributing to injury of 
opponent, while mosit worthy of the attention of the 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAECH, 1963 



Committee, did not elicit the concern anticipated. 

ABOUT PROPOSALS FOR 1963: Questionnaire 
returns sigrufied satisfaction with the present width 
goals, namely, those of 18' 6", when compared to the 
wider goals of 23' 4". 4,575 endorsed goals of the 
present width, with only 1,976 favoring the wider 
goals. In excess of 70% of the retiu'ns wanted to have 
the goal line marked with white material rather than 
material of another color. Two questions were asked 
concerning the numbering of players. In response to 
"Should presently recommended numbering of play- 
ers by position become mandatory?" only 419'c said 
"yes." The respondents favored, by 75%, continuing 
the use of the present numbering system to designate 
positions. Tiiis was overwhelming support of the num- 
bering system used dm-ing the last several years. 3 
out of 5 returns recommended a provision which 
would allow the use of a 2-inch kicking tee. There was 
a slight majority (3,580 to 3,032) in favor of the 
elimination of the use of metal cleats and a similar 
slight majority (3,526 to 3,011) would prohibit line- 
men from wearing any kind of leather giove. The 
Questionnaire smnmaiY revealed that 32'';; wanted to 
eliminate the wearing of forearm guards. It was the 
consensus of 4,562 of those returning Questionnaii-es 
that, when four officials are used, the field judge 
rather than the umpire should time the game. A ma- 
jority of approximately 2/3 were opposed to denying 
the player under the snapper the privilege of moving 
to a new position or being in motion after he had 
extended his hands in position to receive the snap. A 
very substantia! majority (4,974, as opposed to 1,664) 
favored starting the clock during a free-kick at the 
time the ball is legally touched by R. A ratio of ap- 
proximately 3 to 1 recommended granting the offen- 
sive team the privilege of putting the ball in play for 
a repeated down anywhere between the inbounds 
marks on the proper yardline after the administration 
of a foul which occurs before or dui-ing a down if the 
offensive team had this privilege for the down dur- 
ing which the foul occun-ed. Over 2/3 of the respond- 
ents indicated favoring a revision which would pro- 
vide that if a scrimmage-kick beyond the line, at rest, 
is touched by a player of the kicking team, it would 
cause the ball to become dead. In response to the 
question "Should all blocking from the rear be pro- 
hibited?" 3,541 said "yes" and 3,168 said "no." 3,079 
indicated that they would favor considering it illegal 
to block above the shouldei-s. 3,717 were opposed to 
such action. A majority of 2,639 were opposed to de- 
claring a tackle above the shoulder illegal. 1,482 of 
those retmTiing the Questionnaire favored disqualify- 
ing (in addition to the 15-yard penalty) any player 
who grasped an opponent's face protector. However, 
3% times as many returns were opposed to this point 
of view. A very substantial majority were opposed to 
permitting the coach to confer with the entire team 
on the field during a charged time-out. A majority of 
over 600 recommended that the official dimensions of 
the field for 8-man football should be identical with 
those of 11-man. 

AUTHORIZED RULES REVISIONS 

1-4-2: The recommended numbering of players 
will be as follows: Backs, 10-49; Centers, 50-59; 
Guards, 60-69; Tackles, 70-79; Ends, 80-89. 

1-5-1-f: A new item will be added to thiis ari;icle 
which will require that all players wear shoes while 
participating. 

1-5-4: The article will be expanded to provide 
that when an incoming substitute or any player is 
found to have required equipment missing correction 
must be made before participation. 



2-12-2: The revision will provide that a 2-inch 
kicking tee is legal for any place-kick, including free- 
kicks, scrimmage-kicks and pomt-after-touchdown. The 
revision will not prohibit place-kicking with the ball 
placed directly on the ground or when the traditional 
1-inch tee is used. 

3-3-4: Coverage has been revised so that if there 
is fair catch interference during the last timed dovsrn 
of any quarter, the quarter may be extended if the 
penalty is accepted or if the offended team is award- 
ed a fair catch. The offended team will have three 
choices. If the penalty is accepted, the kicking team 
will be required to replay the down during the same 
period. If the offended team chooses to take an a- 
warded fair catch they may make a free-kick or they 
may snap the ball for an untimed down during tne 
same period. If the offended team elects, they may 
put the ball in play by a snap of free-kick on the first 
down of the next period. 

3-5-1: To remove the possibility of the free-kick- 
ing team denying the receiving team an opportunity to 
secure the ball with only a few seconds remaining at 
the end of tne second or fourth quarter, a revision will 
provide that the clock will not start on a free-kick 
until the ball has been legally touched. This expansion 
will eliminate the possibility of a team gaining an 
advantage through using up time by intentionally 
committing fouls. 

4-1-7: An added article wiU provide that when a 
down is repeated after the team putting the ball in 
play has had the privilege of puttmg it in play any- 
where between the inbounds lines on the proper yard- 
line for the down following the measurement of the 
penalty when a team has previously been extended 
this privilege and a foul occurred before or dm-ing the 
down. In any case, when a down is repeated, if the 
team had orignially enjoyed the privilege of moving 
the ball along the yai-dline between the inbounds line 
for either a snap or free-kick, this same privilege is 
available for the offense when the down is replaced 
after a foul. 

8-5-4: Expansion of this article will specifically 
provide that the snapping of free-kicking team, whose 
goal line is involved, shall put the ball In play on its 
20 yardline anywhere between the inbounds lines. 

The section on the Responsibilities and Procedures 
of Officials will delegate the responsibility of timing 
to the field judge, if time is kept on the field, rather 
than the umpire, as presently provided. When the tim- 
ing device is off the field, the field judge will be re- 
quired to signal to start and stop it. 
GENERAL 

1. It was voted to include the following items in 
the 1964 Questionnaire: 

(a) Do you favor placing the goal post crossbar 
on the goal line? 

(b) Should the wearing of arm guards, except for 
protection to an injury, be prohibited? 

(c) Would yiu prefer that the winner of the pre- 
game coin toss have the ehoice of goals of kicking or 
of receiving at the beginning of the half of their 
choice ? 

(d) Should first touching of a scrimmage-kick by 
player of the kicking team cause the ball to become 
dead immediately? If a response is in the affirmative 
the respondent will be requested to indicate his pref- 
erence of the following: Should the ball become dead 
immediately when (a) any scrimmage-kick beyond the 
line is touched; or (b) the ball, beyond the line be- 
cause of a scrimmage-kick, is touched while at rest; 
or (c) when the ball, beyond the line because of a 
scrimmage-kick, is in motion on the ground and is 
touched ? 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1963 



Page Eleven 



(e) Is it desirable to have the rules provide for 
correction of an error which results from an official's 
misapplication of a rule? 

(f) Would you favor scoring a successful point 
after touchdown 2 points for a touchdown and 1 point 
for a field goal or safety? 

2. The Game Administration Sub-Committee was 
authorized to investigate the desirability of adopting 
a signal to indicate a dead ball foul and to study the 
desda^ability of limiting eadh team to one representa- 
tive at the coin toss preceding the game. 

3. The Research Sub-Committee was directed to 
investigate the feasibility of adopting a "sudden 
death" method of eliminating tie games and, if ad- 
visable, to incoi-rporate such a method in the Code to 
submit an appropriate proposal. 

4. The Statistical Sub-Committee was assigned 
the making of a coimparison of the percentage of suc- 
cessful poinitJafter-touohdown attempts by kicks dur- 
ing which the 18' 6" and 23' 4" goals were in use. 

5. Tihe Editor was directed to include in approp- 
riate publication articles which: (a) direct officials to 
penalize promptly and without previous warning, all 
infractions of grasping, holding or twisting the oppon- 
ent's face protector; (b) amplify and clarify the in- 
terpretation for pass interference; (c) interpret Item 
i of Rule 9-2-2; and (d) instruct officials to penalize 
promptly and vigilantly a player who piles on any 
player who is lying on the ground. 

6. Case Book play situations providing cover^e 
and interpretations for the following questions will be 
included in the publication: (a) Is a trick play during 
which the snapper picks up the ball, bands it to the 
snap receiver who insists his team is entitled to a 
penalty, walks several steps towards his opponent's 
goal and then sprints toward a score legal; (b) May 
team A, after a huddle, legally snap the ball the mo- 
ment all are stationary; and (c) May any player or 
only the one blocking a kick, contact a kicker or place- 
kick holder? 

7. The Editor was directed to investigate and 
compare the measurements of official balls used for 
the interscholastic, intercollegiate and professional 
aspects of play. 

8. The Commiittee adopted a resolution favoring 
one set of officials' signals for use by all organizations 
sponsoring competition at the various levels. 

9. The following procedure was adopted for the 
1964 meeting: "All proposals for rules changes must 
be submitted dming the first day's sessions, repro- 
duced and made avaOable to the delegates for the sec- 
ond day's sessions, at which time they wiU be con- 
sidered for action." 

10. By resolution, the Committee directed the ap- 
pointment of a sub-committee to develop procedures 
for the conduct of the meeting, which would be recom- 
mended for adoption by the Committee-of-the- Whole. 
Such matters as the form in which motions for rules 
changes would be submitted, the time limits during 
which such motions would be entertained, the sub- 
mission of reports, etc., would be among the items to 
be included in the sub^eommdttee's report. 



Stagg's Principles 

Some 62 years ago, on the eve of a trip, 
Amos Alonzo Stagg wrote a letter to his 
infant son outlining the principles which 
governed his life and w^hich he hoped his 
son would follow. It is a revealing docu- 
ment which more than anything else helps 
explain the reverence and affection in which 
A. A. Stagg is held. It should be read by 
every father and every son. 

June 23, 1900 
To My Son, Amos Alonzo Stagg, Jr. 

You are only a little fellow now — a trifle 
over 14 months old; but I have loved you 
so dearly since you came that it has been 
on my mind to write you a letter in the 
event of my being taken away at any time 
before I have a chance to tell you many 
things which you need to know. 

Your father wants his Boy first of all 
to love, protect, and care for Ms Mother, 
giving to her the same kind of measure of 
love and devotion w'hich she has given to 
you. 

Second, your father wants his Boy to 
be sincere, honest and upright. Be your 
true self always. Hate dishonesty and 
trickery no matter how big and how great 
the thing desired may be. 

Third, your father wants you to have a 
proper independence of thoug'ht . . . Think 
masters out for yourself always where it 
relates to your own conduct and act honest- 
ly afterwards. 

Four, your father wants you to be an 
American in democracy. Treat everybody 
wirbh courtesy and as your equal until he 
proves his unworthiness to be so treated. 
The man and the soul are what count — not 
wealth, not family, not appearance. 

Fifth, your father wants you to abhor 
evil. No curiosity, no imagination, no con- 
versation, no story, no reading which sug- 
gests impurity of life is worthy of your 
thought or attention and I beg you never 
to yield for an instant but turn your 
thought to something good and helpful. 

Sixth, train yourself to be master of 
yourself, of your thought and imagination 
and temper and passion and appetite and of 
your body. Hold all absolutely under your 
will. Allow no thought nor imagination, nor 
passion, nor appetite to injure your mind or 
body. Your father has never used intoxi- 
cating liquors, nor tobacco, nor profane 
language. He wants his Boy to be like him 
in this regard. 

Seventh, your father wants his Boy en- 
thusiastic and earnest in all of his inter- 
ests, Ms sports, his studies, his work; and 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1963 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



348 Southland Drive 



Lexington, Ky. 



School Representative 

FRED "Rock" REECE 

Versailles, Ky. 

Phone 873-3623 



Distributors of: 



Spanjian 

Southern 

Nocona 

Wilson 

Spalding 

Rawlings 

Voit 

Adidas Track Shoes, State of Ky. 

Dehen & New Era Sweaters 



Bike 

Cramer 

Stim-0-Stam Tablets 

Wigwam Socks 

Butwin Jackets 

Adirondack Bats 

Trophies 

E. R. Moore Gym Suits 

Riddell Helmets & Shoes 



SOUTHLAND SPORT SHOP 



Gene Stokley 



7-3977 



Dick Wallace 



he wants him always to keep an active, ac- 
tual participation in each so long as he lives. 
It is my judgment that one's life is most 
healthy and most successful when lived out 
on such a basis. 

Eighth, your father wants his son to 
love Gk)d as He is revealed to him; which 
after all will be the revelation of all that I 
have said and left unsaid of good to you, 
my precious Boy. 

Affectionately, 
Your Father 
Chicago's American 



He Comes In Second 

Everybody likes a winner and there are always 
people ready to cheer for a good loser. But who 
ever heard a song for the man who comes in second? 

So this is in praise of the almost-winner, the 
nearly champion, the next-to-the biggest, the second 
best. This is the song of Mister Two. 

You hear unflattering najnes for Mister Two. 
"Also-Ran", they call him, and "runner-up." Names 
that make you think of a fellow who couldn't quite 
make it. Don't let that fool you. 

Ask the winner of any race how good a man is 
Mister Two. He'U tell you it's Mister Two who 
made him run so ifiast; Mister Two pressing hard at 



his heels, threaiteninig always to overtake and pass 
him. 

Ask the salesman who won the contest what 
kept hiim plugging after hours, looking for the extra 
order. Ask the directors of the giant corporation 
why they keep changing their product, seeking the 
new improvement, the added advantage. 

What drives them? What keeps them hopping? 
It's the salesman with nearly as many orders. It's 
the company with the product almost as good. It's 
Mister Two. 

In this country, we're proud of the quality of 
our champions. Our big men come very big. Our 
fast men run very fast. Our wise men are the wis- 
est and our great men are the greatest that a 
country could hope to be blessed with. And why is 
that? Couldn't it be because hot on the heels of 
every champion nans a Mister Two? Couldn't it be 
because great Mister Two's grow naturalUy in a 
land where the race is always open and everybody 
can run? 

So this is for you. Mister Two. This is your song. 
This is for all the days you tried for first and 
came in second. It's for the nights when you vron- 
der if you ought to go on trying, since nobody 
seems to notice. 

We notice. Mister Two. We know the score. 
Winner or not, you're a natural champion. There 
couldnlt be a race without you, Mister "rwo. 
—RALPH H. COLSON 
in the MSSPA BUGLE 



Student Accident Protection 
Athletic Coverages 



LEGAL LIABILITY INSURANCE FOR 

YOUTH SPORTS LEAGUES 

HOSPITALIZATION AND MAJOR 

MEDICAL COVERAGES 

ACCIDENT HEALTH INSURANCE 

LIFE INSURANCE 

YOUTH GROUP COVERAGES 

Prompt and Efficient Service 

Local Agent's Name 

On Request. 

*7Ae Kin<fdeit ComfUiHif general agent 

W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 2-8522 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS COMPANY 
For all of your 1963 Spring Sports 

With the baseball and track season just around the corner let us help 
you take care of all your supplies. 

BASEBALL EQUIPMENT 

We have in stock baseball uniforms, two-piece shirt and pants trimm- 
ed ready for immediate lettering to your speaifioations at prices $7.95, 
$9.95, $11.95, and $13.95. Samples and swatches sent upon request. 

MacGregor No. 97 official KHSAA Baseballs, Reach American 
League baseball. Hunt's official League balls, at all prices from $1.60 
each up to $2.35 each. 

Famous Louisville Slugger Bats and all the other items to outfit 
your team. 

TRACK SUPPLIES 

We have a complete stock on track this year including vaulting 
poles, shoes, uniforms, discus, javelins, timers, batons, shots etc. Write 
us for complete school prices on all your Spring Sports including softball, 
tennis, golf and swimming. 

K. E. A. 

When in Louisville for the K. E. A. be sure to visit HUNT'S Dis- 
play in the Kentucky Hotel on April 17, 18 and 19. 

Our salesmen will be on hand to show you all our new 1963 Spring 
and Summer as well as Fall and Winter merchandise. 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO, Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



We ShipImp DaV You BuV 




High Schooi Athtefe 



SENECA HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION— 1963 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Managers Mike Constant, Roger Eppinger, Jim Hord. Second Row: 
David Pflug, Bill Heintz, William Miller, Larry Trunnell, David Hecht, John Fleischaker. Third 
Row: Coach Bob Mulcahy, Allen Hepburn, Bruce Dalrymple, Tom Duggins, James Garrison, Wes- 
ley Unseld, Mike Redd, Ass't Coaches E. Christie and Tom Ash. 



District Tournament Games Won 

Seneca 72-46 Louisville Country Day 

Seneca 88-57 Fern Creek 

Seneca 56-44 Trinity 



Regional Tournament Games Won 

Seneca 62-30 DeSales 

Seneca 39-33 Male 

Seneca 52-49 Central 




Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

APRIL - 19B3 




DUNBAR-RUNNER-UP 
1963 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Front Row: James Berry, Eugene Perrin, Russell King, Robert Washignton, 
Lawrence Cowherd, Richard Green. Second Row: Ass't Coach N. L. Passmore, Mejr. Gilbert 
Smith, Kenneth Higgins, Ronald Carter. Rodney Bolten, George Wilson, James Thornton, James 
Smith, Mgr. Robert Stickland, Coach S. T. Roach. 

OWENSBORO— SEMI-FINALIST 
1963 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




(Left to Right) Front Row: George Moore, J^rry Sheldon, Jim Howes, Joe Arnold, Charles 
Taylor, Don Hayden. Second Row: Joe Zogg, Charles Lewis, Billy Foster, Bob Mathews, Grant Tal- 
bot, Bobby \\'oodward. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXV— NO. 9 



APRIL, 1963 



LOO Per Year 



NEWLY ELECTED BOARD MEMBERS 




Sherman Gish 



Don Davis 



Superintendent Sherman Gish of the 
Muhlenberg County Schools and Assistant 
Superintendent Don Davis of the Kenton 
County Schools will represent Sections 2 
and 5 respectively on the Board of Control 
for a four year period, teginning July 1, 
1963. Mr. Gish is presently a Board mem- 
ber, and Mr. Davis will be serving on the 
Board for the first time. 

Mr. Gish, a graduate of Bremen High 
School in Muhlenberg County, holds an A. 
B. and M.A. degree from Western Ken- 
tucky. He was married to the former Ruby 
Mae Miller. They have one son, Raymon 
"Rip" Gish, a former basketball star at 
Western Kentucky, who is now with the 
Phillips Petroleum Company after playing 
for the Marines two years. 

Shei-man Gish has been in the Muhlen- 
berg County school system for the past 
thirty-five years in various positions, teach- 
er, coach, principal and superintendent. He 
is a member of the Bethlehem Baptist 
Church, the Third District Kentucky Educa- 
tional Association, the National Education 
Association, and the state and national as- 
sociations of school administrators. 

Mr. Davis, a graduate of the Dayton 
High School, holds a B.S. degree in Educa- 
tion from the University of Cincinnati, and 
an M.E. degree from St. Xavier University. 
He lettered in football, basketball, and base- 
ball in college. At various times in his 
coaching career he has coached basketball, 
football, baseball, track, and swimming. 



The new Board member is affiliated 
with numerous professional educational or- 
ganizations. He is a Past President of the 
Bellevue Rotary Club, a charter member of 
the Campbell County Youth Advisory 
Committee, and a Past Chairman of the 
Bellevue Youth Advisory Committee. 

Mr. Davis was in the service during the 
1941-46 period, being discharged with the 
rank of 1st Lieutenant in the Coast Artil- 
lery Anti-Aircraft. Since that time teach- 
ing and coaching assignments have been at 
Wellston (Ohio) High School, Dayton High 
School, and Holmes High School. From 1957 
to 1962 Mr. Davis was Principal of the 
Bellevue High School, and he was named 
Assistant Superintendent of Kenton County 
Schools in 1962. He is married to the for- 
mer Mary Louise Byland. They have four 
children, one boy and three girls. 



1963 Annual Meeting 

The businsss meeting of the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association will be held on Thursday, April 
18, at 3:00 P.M. The place will be the Terrace Room 
at the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville. The dinner meet- 
ing will be held in the Crystal Ballroom at the 
Brown Hotel at 6:00 P.M. 

The principal speaker at the dinner meeting vwll 
be Executive Secretary Sam Burke of the Georgia 
High School Association. The presenltiition of the 
Game Guy Award will be made during the meeting. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Constitution, the following proposals for 
clianges in the rules of the Association, ai-e hereby 
submitted to all members of the K. H. S. A. A. for 
their consideration. 

PROPOSAL I 

The Board of Control proposes that "twenty" 
and ' twenty-six" be substituted for "twenty-four" 
and "thirty" respectively in the second sentence of 
By-Law 21; and that the following be added to the 
By-Law: This change, if adopted, is not to take 
effect until the beginning of the 1985-66 school 
year." 

PROPOSAL II 

The Board of Control proposes that the first 
sentence of By-Law 19 be an-ended to read as fol- 
lows: "All fooitball, baskeltball, bjiseball, and track 
contes'ts played in Kentucky by member schools of 
the K. H. S. A. A. shall be played under the Na- 
tional Federation Rules (Clarification). 
PROPOSAL III 

The administrators of the 44th district proposes 
that "nineteenth" be substituted for "twentieth" in 
(Continued on Page Five) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOaL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1963 



APRIL, 1963 



VOL. XXV— NO. 9 



Pnblished monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown 

Vice-President Cecil A. Thornton {1960-64), Harlan 

Directors— Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman 
Gish (1962-63), Greenville; Preston Holland (1961-65), Murray; 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-65), Danville; Foster J. Sanders (1962- 
66), Louisville; Oran C. Teatcr (1960-64), Paintsville. 

Subscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

jflDin the Commissionet s Ufflce 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1962-63 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Offiaal's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



STATE TRACK MEET SCHEDULE 
Lexington, Kentucky May 17-18 

(Time is Eastern Standard Time) 
FRIDAY 

3:00 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hui-dles (4 heats) 2 
from eaeh heat qualify for Finals; Shot Put and 
Pole Vault, Finals. 

3:20 P.M.— 100 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

3:35 P.M.— 880 Yard Relay (4 heats), 2 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:05 P.M. — 440 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:30 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (4 heats), 2 
fram each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:50 P.M.— 880 Yard Run (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

5:15 P.M.— 220 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

5:35 P.M. — Mile Relay (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

SATURDAY 

1:00 P.M. — High Jump, Discus, and Broad Jump. 

2:00 P.M.— 120 Yard High Hui-dles 

2:15 P.M.— 100 Yard Dash 

2:30 P.M.— Mile Run 

2:45 P.M.— 880 Yard Relay 

3:00 PM,^40 Yard Dash 

8:15 P.M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles 

3:30 P.M.— 880 Yard Run 

3:45 P.M.— 220 Yard Dash 

4:00 P.M. — Mile Relay 



MINUTES OF THE BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at 
the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Friday 
morning, March 15, 1963. The meeting was 
called to order by President K. G. Gillaspie 
at 9:00, with all Board members and Com- 
missioner Theo. A. Sanford present. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by 
Preston Holland, that the reading of the 
minutes of the January 26th meeting be 
waived since the members of the Board had 
received copies of these minutes. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that, 
through an error, a tie which existed in the 
53rd district tournament balloting between 
Dunham High School and the Whitesburg 
High School had not teen reported at the 
January meeting of the Board ; and that, in 
accordance with established custom, the 
President and the Commissioner had bixiken 
the tie, and had named the Whitesburg 
High School as the 1963 53rd district tourn- 
ament site. 

The Commissioner reported the results 
of the recent balloting for Board member- 
sihip in Section 2 and Section 5 as follows: 
Section 2 — Sherman Gish 18, W. P. 
Wheeler 16, J. D. Rayburn 7; Section 5 — 
Don Davis 13, Eugene Robinson 11, Tebay 
Rose 11. 

There was a discussion of new proposals 
to be presented by the Board of Control 
to the forthcoming Delegate Assembly. Don 
R. Rawlings moved, seconded by Foster J. 
Sanders, that the following proposals be 
presented by the Board of Control to the 
Delegate Assembly : 

PROPOSAL I — The Board of Control 
proposes that "twenty" and "twenty-six" 
be substituted for "twenty-four" and 
"thirty" respectively in the second sentence 
of By-Law 21 ; and that the following be 
added to the By-Law: "This change, if 
adopted, is not to take effect until the 
beginning of the 1965-66 school year." 

PROPOSAL H— The Board of Control 
proposes that the first sentence of By-Law 
19 be amended to read as follows: "All foot- 
ball, basketball, baseball, and track contests 
played in Kentucky by member schools of 
the K.H.S.A.A. shall be played under the 
National Federation Rules (Clarification)." 

By unanimous vote the Board agreed 
to submit the two proposals. 

The Commissioner read a letter which 
he had received from Brother Giles, a mem- 
ber of the St. Joseph Prep coaching staff, 
suggesting that the Board consider adding 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1963 



Page Three 



wrestling to the list of K.H.S.A.A. sponsor- 
ed sports. The Board deferred any actions 
on the request until the April meeting. 

The Commissioner reported that Execu- 
tive Secretary Sam Burke of the Georgia 
High School Association had agreed to be 
the principal speaker at the forthcoming 
dinner meeting of the K.H.S.A.A. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Cecil 
A. Thornton, that all bills of the Associa- 
tion for the period beginning January 26, 
1963, and ending March 14, 1963, be ap- 
proved. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business, the 
meeting adjourned. 



A RETRACTION 

In the February issue of the ATHLETE 
an article appeared written by Francis El- 
liott, based upon an interview with Neil 
Reed, former coach at Wauconda (Illinois) 
High School and presently a graduate 
assistant in basketball at the University 
of Kentucky. Although the names of no 
individuals were mentioned, certain dis- 
paraging statements were made by Mr. 
Reed concerning former members of the 
coaching staff and players at the Illinois 
school. 

Supt. Richard Warfield of Wauconda 
takes exception to some of the statements 
made by Mr. Reed which are derogatory to 
members of his student body and coaching 
staff. He asks for retractions concerning 
these statements, which we are glad to 
make. We also offer our apology to Mr. 
Warfield and any members of his faculty 
or student body who mig'ht be involved. 

In a letter to the Commissioner, Mr. 
Warfield says: "The comments and the 
quotation made by Mr. Reed are defama- 
tory in nature concerning the character of 
the boys in Wauconda High School, the 
Athletic Director and the coaching staff. 
This is my 17th year in Wauconda High 
School and the breaking of training rules by 
the athletes has never been a serious pro- 
blem." 



New Baseball Film 

The film of the 1962 World Series is 
now available. It may be secured by writing 
to the Film Library, University of Ken- 
tucky, Lexington. Highlights of all the 
seven games of the series are shovni in the 
picture. It is a sound film in color, and runs 
about thirty minutes. 



The series was between the New York 
Yankees of the American League and the 
San Francisco Giants of the National Lea- 
gue. The opening game was played at San 
Francisco with Whitey Ford and the Yanks 
winning. At the end of five games the 
Yankees were leading by three games to 
two. The series play was held up by rain 
for three days when the teams returned to 
the Giants park. After the Giants won the 
sixth game, the American League champ- 
ions won the deciding game by a score of 
1 to 0. 

The film may be used by baseball coach- 
es to show their teams the batting and 
fielding play of such great stars as Mays 
and Hiller of the Giants, and Maris, Mantle 
and Boyer of the Yanks. Thrilling plays are 
in slow motion so they may be observed 
closely. The picture would be interesting 
and entertaining to the student body as a 
protgram for assembly. 



Early Season Baseball Questions 

EDITOR'S NOTE: These rulings do not set aside 
or modify any rule. They are interpretations of 
some of the early season situations which have been 
presented. 

1. Play: Does the recent action taken by the 
Professional Baseball Rules Committee affect the 
strike zone foT g'ames played under the National 
Alliance Baseball Rules? 

Ruling: No. There is no change in the strike 
zone for games played under the National Alliance 
Baseball Rules. The National Alliance Baseball 
Rules provide that the "strike zone" is the space 
over home plajte which is between the batter's arm 
pits and the top of his knees when he assumes his 
naituiTal stance. 

2. Play: With runners on Isit, 2nd and 3rd 
bases with two out, B6 swings and misses third 
strike which P2 drops. B6 runs toward 1st base. 
Is it necesisiary for F2 to throw B6 out at 1st base 
to retire the side? 

Ruling: No. F2 can tag Rl if he is advancing 
to home base from 3rd or he may touch home base 
while holding the ball in his hand and retire Rl or 
he may throw the ball to any base to obtain a force- 
out of the runner who would be advancing there. 

3. Play: With Rl on 2nd base and R2 on 1st 
trying to steal 3rd and 2nd bases respectively, F2 
receives the pitch and, in attempting to throw to 
2nd base, the back swing of his arm strikes the 
umjHre. Is this umpire interference? 

Ruling: If the umpire believes he was out of 
position and in the way of the catcher he may de- 
clare the ball dead when the interference occurs and 
require all runners to return to the bases they legal- 
ly occupied at the time of the interference. If he 
believes he was not out of position when the arm of 
F2 struck him, the ball rem^ains alive and there is no 
interference. 

4. Play: Rl is on 1st base when B2 hits a 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1963 



ground ball to Fl. Rl starts toward 2nd base and 
Fl throws the ball to Ist, retiring B2. F3 overlooks 
Rl, who is between Isit and 2nd, and throws ball to 
F2. Rl then returns to 1st base without having 
touched 2nid or having been tagged with the ball 
while off base. 

Ruling: Rl is safe at 1st base. He was privileg- 
ed to return there because the force on Rl wias re- 
moved when B2 was retired at 1st base. 

5. Play: Hit by B2 enables Rl to reach 3rd 
base. Rl is in contact with the base for approxi- 
mately 2 or 3 seconds when F5, who has juggled the 
throw from the outfield, secures possession of the 
ball and dives at Rl for a tag. In making the tag, 
F5 contacts body or leg of Rl and, as a result, 
forces Rl off the base, holding the ball on him 
while he is off the base. 

Ruling: Rl is not ouit. There is no penalty 
prescribed in the rules book for the action of F5. 
An expsrieruced umpire will overlook the aotion of 
the fieldea- (F5) in such a play the first time it 
occurs. If repeated, the umpire will warn him and 
then, if it happens again, he will banish the fielder 
for an unsportsmanlike act. 

Comment: The above act is not obs/truction be- 
cause obstrudtion is impeding the progress of the 
runner by a fielder wibile he does not have the ball 
in his possession or while he is not fielding the 
ball. 

6. Play: With one out, Rl is on 3rd base and 
B3 is at ciat. B3 bunts ball into the air in fair 
teiritory between 3rd and home bases. As F2 at- 
tempts to field the ball, Rl, advancing toward home 
base, collides with him, preventing F2 from catching 
the pop-up hunt which may have prevented a double 
phy. 

Ruling: Ball becomes dead immediately when 
the interference occurs and Rl is declared out. Since 
batted ball was fair, B3 is awarded 1st base. Had 
the ball been over foul ground at the time Rl 
committed the interference, the ball would have 
become dead inmiediately, but B3 would have been 
required to stay at bat with the ball and strike 
count on him tlie same as it was before tihe ait- 
tempted bunt. 

7. Play: With Rl, R2 and R3 on 3rd, 3nd and 
1st bases, respectively, F2 takes a windup position. 
He starts his full rotation and, while bands and 
arms are up over his head, his cap comes off his 
head. He makes the delivery without any interrup- 
tion or alteration of Ms motion. 

Ruling: Legal pitch, since Fl, after having 
started his movement which he customarily uses in 
his delivery, did not hitch, jerk nor interrupt his 
pitching motion. 

8. Play: With one out, Rl and R2 are on 3rd 
and 2nd bases, respectively. B4 hits a fair ball wthieh 
appears to be a three-base hit. Rl crosses home base 
without touching it and R2 advances, touchd-ng 3rd 
base and home base before B4 is tagged out at 
3rd base. F5 throws ball to F2, who steps on home 
base and aippeals Rl's infraction (missing home 
base). 

Ruling: R2 scores. Appeal on Rl at home base 
is allowed. Even though the out miade by Rl at 
home is the third out insofar as the order of outs 
is concerned, it actually is the second out of the 
inning and B4 made the third out at 3rd base. When 
R2 touched home base, Rl already was out because 
of the subsequent allowed appeal. Rule 9-1-1 Ex- 
ception (c) provides a run is not scored if the run- 
ner advances to home base during aotion in which 
the third out is made by the preceding runner be- 



ing declared out because he failed to touch one of 
the bases. Exception (c) does not apply to this 
situation. Had B4 been put out at 3rd base before 
R2 touched home base and the appeal allowed on 
Rl on home base, the run made by R2 would score. 

9. Play: With two out, Rl is on 1st base. B4 
hits a long line drive to left center field. Rl ad- 
vances to where his momentum causes him to run 
in an arc outside of the base path. The throw by 
the fielder to F2 bounces and strikes Rl when he is 
on foul ground. Rl scores and the ball rolls toward 
home base, where F2 retrieves it and attempts to 
throw B4 out at 3rd base. T'hi-ow is wild and B4 
scores. 

Ruling: Both rims score. There is no penality 
for a runner running more than 3 feet away from a 
direct line between bases unless it is done to avoid 
being tagged; or to hinder a fielder when the run- 
ner is advancing or returning to a base; or to ob- 
tain a running start from a base after a fly ball 
is touched by a fielder. 

10. Play: In a game in which re-enti-y is per- 
mitted, SI enters the game to pinch-hit for B9 and 
leaves the game after he has batted. Later, SI 
attempts to replace B4. 

Ruling: SI may not enter a second time. A sub- 
sititute is allowed to enter the game only one time. 

11. Play: SI, who appears at bat for B9, fail- 
ed to i-eport to the umpire. 

Ruling: There is no penalty prescribed. If the 
umpire notices that the batter is a pinch hitter, he 
should ask him if he is and then require him to re- 
port before entering the batter's box. If the umpire 
fails to notice the substitute, the substitute becomes 
a player when he enters the batter's box. 

12. Play: With a runner on base, F5 hides the 
ball. Fl (without ball) steps on pitcher's plate or 
stands asti-ide it while B3: (a) is standing in the 
batter's box ready to hit; or (b) is out of the bat- 
ter's box applying dirt to his hands or receiving a 
signal from coacher. 

Ruling: Balk in both (a) and (b). 

13. Play: In a game whidh is being played under 
the re-etntry rule. Si replaces F9. F9 re-enters the 
game, to relieve the pitcher Fl, during the same half- 
inning in which he was replaced by Si. Fl then re- 
places SI in right field or S2 replaces SI. 

Ruling: Legal. Players in the game must occupy 
the same position in the battting order whenever 
they are in the line-up. 

14. Play: Bl hits a fair line drive which is 
touched by F4 ar.d, while it is still in flight, the 
ball strikes the base umpire who is behind F4. The 
ball is caught in flight by F6. 

Ruling: Bl is not out. The ball remains alive in 
this situation because it has passed an infielder 
other than the pitcher before it strikes the umpire. F6 
may throw out Bl at first. When a ball strikes an 
umpire while it is in flight, it is the same as touching 
the ground which is directly beneath the ball. 

15. Play: Rl is on 2nd base when B2 hits a 
ground ball to F6, who throws Rl out at 3rd base. 
B2 is then obsti-ucted by F4 and thrown out at 2rJd 
base. 

Ruling: Rl is out and B2 is awarded 2nd base. 

16. Play: With Rl on 2nd base, the ball is hit 
to F6, who, after momentarily obstructing Rl, fields 
the ball and tags Rl with it and then throws out 
B2 at 1st base. 

Ruling: Award Rl 3rd base and B2 is out. 

17. Play: Rl, on 1st base, reaches 2nd base 
before F2 touches the pitch. The pitch: (a) becomes 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1963 



Page Five 



a passed ball which g'oes into the stair.ds; or (b) is 
muffed by F2, who in attempting to prevent Rl frwn 
advancing further, overthrows 3rd base into the 
stands. 

RuliT.ig: In (a), Rl is awarded 2nd and in (b), R2 
is awarded 3rd. 

18. Play: With Rl and R2 on 3rd and 2nd bases, 
respectively, Fl places both feet on pitcher's plate 
and: (a) pumps his arms once and pitches; or (b) 
raises his arms over his head as he places his non- 
pivot foot on ground in fronlt of pitcher's plate. He 
then brings airms down in fro.-it of his body with both 
hands on the ball, pausing one second prior to de- 
livering. 

Ruling: Lagai in (a) and balk in (b). 

19. Play: With a count of strike two on B2 and 
Rl on 2nd base, the next pitch strikes bat of B2 
and goes directly to catcher's: (a) mask and bounces 
into air after which F2 catches it in flight; or (b) 
mitt or hand and rebounds into the air and F2 
catches ball before it touches the ground. 

Ruling: In (a), the ball becomes dead as soon 
as it strikes the catcher's mask and it is ruled an 
uncaught foul. In (b), B2 is out and because it is 
a foul tip, Rl may advance. 

20. Play: With (a) no runner; or (b) one 
runner on base. Pi pitches from a set position but 
fails to come to a complete stop for a full second with 
the ball in both hands in front of his body following 
his stretch prior to delivering. 

Ruling: Illegal pitch in both (a) and (b). In 
(a), it is a ball and in (b) it is a balk. 

21. Play: May the official scorer or the scorer 
for each team keep the official record of charged 
conferences ? 

Ruling: It is the duty of the umpire-in-chief to 
keep a record of charg'ed confei-ences and to notify 
the respective coaches each time a conference is 
charged to his team. 



1963 Annual Meeting 

(Continued from Page One) 

By-Law 4, this change to become effective at the 
beginning of the 1966-67 school year. 
PROPOSAL IV 
Prin. Paul W. Trimble (Paintsville) proposes that 
the followinig be added to Toumament Rule V-A: 
'■An official shall not work a district or regional 
tourniament in the district or region in which he 
resides." 



Early Season Track Questions 

EDITOR'S NOTE: These rulings do not set a- 
side or modify any rule. They are interpretations on 
some of the early season situations which have 
been presented. 

1. Situation: What is the procedure for deter- 
mining the awarding of places and points when 
there is a tie in an event? 

Ruling: The procedure used for a field event is 
different from that used when a track event has a 
tie. When there is a tie in a track event, a winner 
is not determined. The points for the event shall 
be divided equally between the tying competitors 
(two or more) and the prizes shall be awarded by 
lot. The prooediure to be followed in the event of a 
tie in a field event is defined in the second para- 



graph of Riile 5, Section 2, 1963 edition of the 
Naitional Alliance Track and Field Rules and Rec- 
ord Book. 

2. Situation: What is the length of the baton 
passing zone? 

Ruling: It is now 22 yards. Until this year, the 
exchange zsone was 20 yards long. 

3. Sibuiabion: Al takes a position on his mark 
when inisitrudted to do so by the starter. Al does not 
change his position when the starter commands 
"Set." The starter in conformance with the rule, 
fires the pisitol and Al is left in his blocks. 

Ruling: Legal start. Al may or may not take a 
position ousitomarily used by a competitor in a 
dash race. The situation does not indicate nor imply 
that Al was in motion or over the line when the 
pistol was fired and, therefore, there was no viola- 
tion. 

Comment: It is considered good procedure for 
the starter to explain the commands and mechanics 
of sitarting to the competitors before a heat of any 
raioe is run. However, the starter is not obligated 
to do this and under no condition may he coach the 
competitors. 

4. Situaibion: Is there a confliat between track 
situation ruiing 2C'S and Rule 6, Section 2? 

Ruling: No. A competitor may or may not use 
the crouch start. The crouch start is not mandatory. 
At the comnTijnid of the sitarter, the competitor can 
get on his mark in an upright position: At the 
starter's command "Set", the competitors sihaU as- 
sums their full and final set positions. This position 
is the compeltitor's own position and may not nec- 
essarily be a crouch or if a crouch, it is not requir- 
ed that he raise his back when the starter gives 
the command, "Set." Tha rule merely says that the 
comjpsititor's position in response to the starter's 
"Set" command is his final position. Situation 20S 
provides this interpretation and it does make clear 
that ithe competitor may take a position of his 
choice at ''Set". The coverage prohibits late re- 
sponses to the starter's command. 

5. Situiation: Does windage have a bearing on 
a pole vault record? 

Ruling: No. The only reference to anemometer 
readings is in Rule 2, Section 3, and applies as 
specified i.e., only to the dashes, the hurdles and the 
broad jump events. , 

6. Sitiuation: When does a vaulter leave the 
ground in a pole vault attempt? 

Ruling: A vaulter leaves the ground in an at- 
tempt when both his feet have left the ground. 

7. Sii'"Uiation: Discus, thrown by Al, sitrikes 
one of the markers being used in measuring the 
distance of throws before it touches the ground or 
it strikes the ground at the point where the marker 
is in the ground. 

Ruling: Throw by Al is measured to the steel 
rod marker which the discus struck. 

Comment: In some areas the possibility of this 
occurring has been avoided by placing the markers 
so that they indicate the correct distance outside the 
throwing sectors. 

8. Situaition: In order to gain height in the 
broad jump, Al places a hurdle to serve as a guide 
in his paith on the runway or pit or to one side of 
the runwiay or pit. Is this legal? 

Ruling: No. The use of Sie hurdle in the broad 
jump event is considered a mechanical add and is. 
prohibited. 

(Conltinued on Page Ten) 



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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1963 



The Flying Dutchman 

Everything was better at the State 
High School Basketball Tournament this 
year. 

Colonel L. V. Phillips, former Commis- 
sioner of the Indiana High School Athletic 
Association, was an interested spectator. 
Colonel Phillips is an authority on Tourna- 
ment Administration. His comments are 
meaningful. Commissioner Phillips was im- 
pressed with the sportsmanship of the 
fans, players, and coaches. He praised 
highly the masterful handling of the game 
by the eight officials. 

Ken Gillaspie's words of thanks to the 
Hospitality Committee, which was created 
to make all Kentuckians feel at home in 
Louisville, were appreciated. This Com- 
mittee was composed of a cross-section of 
Jefferson County leaders sparked by the 
Louisville Chamber of Commerce, journa- 
lists, police, and others too numerous to 
mention. 

Kentucky's teen agers had wholesome, 
supervised recreation after each night's ses- 
sion ended. Picture, if you can, more than 
1500 (fifteen hundred) boys and girls from 
every nook and cranny of the Common- 
wealth having wholesome fun together at 
a Teen Town Hop in the Flag Room of the 
Kentucky Hotel. The next night there was 
a special late movie for variety — and so 
it went. 

So popular have these events become 
that Convention Hall will be used in 1965 
if the "Schoolboy Classic" returns to Louis- 
ville. The crowds have outgrown the Flag 
Room. 

What are the results of this planned 
fun for Kentuckv's youngsters? Bovs and 
girls are no longer found on the streets late 
at nierht — They have places to go where 
top-flight supervision is provided. Kids from 
eastern, central, and western Kentucky get 
to know and like each other socially in a 
"Melting Pot of Supervised Recreation." 

One pretty cheerleader, who had shed 
tears an hour and a half earlier when her 
team was eliminated was laughing happily 
with her date at the "Hop" — and he was 
the "Eagle Eve" who had beaten her be- 
loved team. Then he was awful. Ninety 
minutes later she was introduced to him 
socially, and he became "Mr. Wonderful." 
A good hospitality program for the students 
causes them to forget the sting of defeat 
in a hurry. 

Visitors to the State Tournament readily 
see why Kentucky is often referred to as 



"The Sportsmanship Capitol of the Na- 
tion." Booing is virtually non-existent, 
coaches take their defeats and refuse to 
alibi, while the winning and losing teams 
and their supporters have fun together im- 
mediately after the contests are completed 
in a massive Hospitality Program. 

Consideration of the fine supervision set 
up by the hotels and adding to this the 
sincere interest taken in the visiting young 
people by the Hospitality Committee, causes 
the Dutchman to recommend Kentucky's 
State Tournament to parents for a whole- 
some spring vacation for their children. 

This article is being written on Sunday 
following the finals of the State Classic. 
The Dutchman has just returned from 
Seneca's victory celebration. Almost 400 
(four hundred) cars formed a motorcade 
which was led through Louisville by Prin- 
cipal Kenneth Farmer. The State Champs 
rode on a fire truck. When the Motorcade 
returned, a standing-room-only crowd was 
packed in the gymnasium. These Seneca 
"Redskins" are not only champions of the 
hardwood, they are also well-coached gentle- 
men. Coach Bob Mulcahy gets the Dutch- 
man's salute of the month. He is one of 
Kentucky's finest gentlemen. 

The next big event on the athletic pro- 
gram is real fun. We're talking about the 
K.H.S.A.A. Dinner at Louisville's Brown 
Hotel for school leaders, coaches, officials, 
and their wives on April 18, 1963. This 
Dinner always honors the Game Guy of the 
Year. 

From Stan Portmann, Editor of The 
Franklin Favorite, comes the last recom- 
mendation of the season for Game Guy of 
1963. Stan nomin-i.ted David Houston, and 
Bert Borrone of Bowling Green's Park City 
News seconded his choice. 

Stan nominates David because he was 
side-lined during the 1961 Football Season 
with one collapsed lung and a partial col- 
lapse of the remaining one. Dave didn't 
quit. He fought back and recovered al- 
though his doctors held out little hope be- 
cause such a recovery is rare. 1962 saw 
this lionhearted lad have a brilliant football 
season, and the following basketball sc'^son 
was equally sensational. Dave has his Lion- 
heart Award and is now eligible to enter the 
competition for the title "GAME GUY 
OF 1963." 

Because of the unselfish interest taken 
in this fighting youngster, the Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor Award for this month goes 
to Franklin's Stan Portmann. 

The Dutchman will look for you at the 
athletic dinner. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1963 



Page Nine 



1963 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 



Average Score: For Winner^ 62.7; For Losers, 49.9; Total for both 112.6 per game 

Average No. Personal Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) 25.5 per game 

Average No. Times per game a player committed 5 Personals .33 per game 

Total No. Free Throvi^ Attempts (Per. and T. for all games 588) Successful 61.0 7o 
Total No. of Overtimes: 



Total Games : 

Average No. : 

Average No. : 
Average No.: 
Average No. : 

Average No. : 

Average No. : 

Average No.: 



Average No. 

Average No. 
Average No. 
Average No. 

Average No. 
Average No. 

Average No. 
Average No. 
Average No. 



DATA COLLECTED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

(a) Official scorer wore identifying apparel: 15-Yes Total Games 

Black and white striped garment: 15-Yes Total Games 

(b) Common fouls committed by player while he or 

a teammate was in control: 1.46 per game 

(c) Fouls involving dribbler and guard: 5.8 per game 

(d) Times dribbler committed foul: .86 per game 

(e) Personal fouls along free throw lane: By Team A. __ .20 per game 

By Team B .26 per game 

(f) Technical foul on coach or bench personnel 

for unsportsmanlike conduct: .06 per game 

(g) Times irregularity noted and corrected as 

provided by 2-10 per game 

(h) Overall tim.e from first toss to final gun: 1 hour 
and 8 minutes. 

DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 

(a) Times official handed ball to player for back 

court throw-in: 8.5 per game 

(b) Violation of 3-second lane rule: 1.06 per game 

(c) Violation by free thrower: per game 

(d) Violation by team A player along free throw 

lane: .13 per game 

(e) Violation by team B player along free throw lane: per game 

(f) Violation called for excessively swinginig arms 

and/or elbows: per game 

(g) Total violations (of all types) by winning 5 losing 4.2 team 

(h) Times substitutions were made during game 9.9 per game 

(i) Times substitutes entered after a violation: .66 per game 



TABULATION OF VOTES ON HIGHEST RATED OFFICIALS — 1963 STATE TOURNAMENT 

Listed balow are the tabulations of votes on ths twelve officials who .received the highest rarhings by 
coaohes of the sixteen teams which participated in the recent State High School Basketball Tournament. 
Eacih ccaoh voted on eight Ceitified officials in the order of his preference, the official whose name was 
listed first by the coach receiving eight points, the second official seven points, etc. The schools given be- 
low are not listed in order by regions nor are they listed in the order of the tournament bracket. 



Official 



ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP TOTAL 



Foster "Sid" Meade 






7 


6 






1 


7 


3 




7 


8 






4 


8 


51 


Bob Foster 




5 


8 










6 




2 




7 


3 


5 


5 




41 


Bobby Flynn 




6 




4 




5 


8 








3 






7 


7 




40 


Charlie Irwin 




7 






8 


8 






8 








7 


2 






40 


Roy Winchester 


6 


8 


1 




7 


6 








1 






2 


4 






35 


Jerry Kimmel 


8 




3 






7 






7 








8 








83 


John W. Brown 






5 












6 






4 




8 


8 




81 


Warren Cooper* 


2 






8 


2 






2 






8 


5 










27 


Walt Green 






6 










8 








6 








7 


27 


Jack Wise 








1 




2 


6 






6 


5 








6 




26 


Irv Spencer 


5 


1 




2 




4 














4 


3 




5 


24 


Roy Settle 


7 








4 








4 








6 








21 



*The tie existing: for the eighth place official was broken by lot. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1963 



Oldham County^-Semi-Finalist 
1963 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mgrs. Roger Cranfill, Larry Cranfill, Mike Boyles, John Bowman. 
Second Row: Gary Chisholm, Keith Oglesby, Todd Roberts, Ronnie Webster, Danny Shearer, David 
Prather, Billy Brown. Third Row: Ass't Coach Ray Warmath, Harry Westmoreland, Pete Wright, 
Jackie Swann, Billy Mathis, Bobby Jenkins, Norman Brown, Eddie Wilhoyte, Coach Barney Thweatt. 



TRACK QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page Five) 

9. Situation: Is it customary or desirable to 
recall runners when starting blocks slip? Does the 
same interpretaition prevail for both indoor and 
outdoor meets 

Ruling: Runners should be recalled when start- 
ing blocks of a competitor slip. The race is recalled 
because of unfair stai-t. This ruling prevails for both 
indoor and outdoor meets. 

10. Situation: Broad jumper Al makes a prop- 
er take-off from the board hvit jumps diagonally so 
that he hnds outside the landing pit. 

Ruling: Legal jump. However, the contestant 
will be at a cisadvant^ge since measurement is at 
riglit angle from the sei-atch line extended. 

11. Situation: High jumper Al wins the high 
jump event at 6'3". He desires to have the bar rais- 
ed above the record height. Is this permissible and 
is Al allowed one try or three tries? 

Ruling: After a competitor has won his event, 
there is nothing to prevent him from continuing to 
jump for a record. He should ba permitted three 
trials at each height until he fails. 

12. Situation: If starter is also the referee, 
should he penalize any foul he observes or should 
he act only on a report by an inspector. 

Ruling: He should penalize any foul he sees. 

13. Situation: Al is at starting position in a 
relay and he is charged with a false start. Miay 
coach interchange Al and A3 to cancel the false 
start ? 



Ruling: No. While the rules are not specific as 
to when changes may be made in the order of run- 
ners, it is intended that changes will not be per- 
mitted after positions have been taken. 

14. Situation: A vaulting pole is wrapped vnth 
tape. At intervals of several inches, two or more 
thicknesses of tape are folded or rolled and bound 
to the pole by another thickness of tape, thus pro- 
viding rings which give a better handgrip. Is such 
wrapping legal? 

Ruling: No. The i-ules prescribe that not more 
than two thicknesses of tape may be used as a pole 
b'ncliug and then these must be of uniform thickness. 
When a strip of tape is folded or rolled, it conisti- 
tutes more than one thickness which, when bound by 
another thickness, constitutes illegal binding. 

15. Situation: In a triangular track meet, the 
Games Committee announces that four places will 
be scored on a 5-3-2-1 basis. In the h'gh jump, only 
three boys enter or only three competitors clear the 
bar at the first heig-ht. Should points for only the 
first three places be awarded or should the three 
place winnei's each be awarded an additional frac- 
tion of the point, the total of which would equal 
the score for fourth place? 

Ruling: In a case of this kind, it is customary 
to score only three places (5-3-2 points) and to 
disrecyard the fourth place point. However, the 
Games Committee is usually peiTnitted discretion in 
connection with decisions for problems which have 
not been anticipi;ted and have not been announced 
prior to the beginning of the meet, so that if it 
were its decision, points could be scored in four 
places. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1963 



Page Eleven 



16. Situation: In the 880 yard ©vent, Al and 
Bl are advancing around a curve when Bl clearly 
forces Al off the track. The inspector indicates the 
infraction. At the time of the infraction, no other 
competitor is within 50 yiards of Al or Bl. Both 
runners continue to race with Al winnii^ and Bl 
finishing second. Since the interference did not pre- 
vent Al from winning the pace, should the infrac- 
tion be overlooked and should Bl be awarded points 
for second place ? 

Ruling: The inspector will report the infraoldon 
to the referee who may, even though Al finidied 
first, disqualify Bl if, in the referee's judgeanent, the 
infraction necessitates disqualification. In arriving 
at his decision, the referee may consider whether the 
act was deliberate or unsportsmanlike, oi whether 
the infraction hindered Al from establishing recoord. 

17. Situation: In a meet in which there are 
foui- competing schools, there is a two mile relay 
and three teams are competing. Team A is running 
in first place when they lap a ninner of team C. 
The track inspector waves the lapped runner from 
the track. Is he correct in doing so ? 

Ruling: The Games Committee may authorize 
the removal of a lapped runner. If this provision is 
not announced prior to the start of the meet, the 
lapped runner should be allowed to continue as long 
as he does not act in such a way as to pass a team- 
mate or to deliberately hinder an opponent. The 
rules do not specify that a lapped runner must be 
removed. Instead, they suggest that the Gomes 
Comanittee may order this done in certain races. 
They would not ordinarily do this in an event in 
which all finishing runners wall place. 

18. Situation: In a t;i-ial heat, hurdler Al reach- 
es the last hm'dle. He does not attempt to go over 
this hurdle but uses his hands to push the huidle 
over, after which he finishes the race. 

Ruling: Al should be disqualified. A competitor 
must attempt to cleai' each hurdle. If he knocks 
over a hurdle in such an attempt, he has not violated 
any rule, but if he pushes the hurdle over with his 
Jiand, it should be treated the same as if he has run 
around a hurdle. 

19. Situation: Runner Al takes his maxk or 
set position with his hand or hands on the sitartmg 
line. 

Ruling: "At the sitai't, no competitor shall touch 
the track with any part of the body on or ahead 
of the nuai-ked line." The starter is responsMe to 
see that the hands of competitors shall be placed 
behind the starting line. 

20. Situation: The top of the pole vauJit bar 
is measured to be 12' 2 7/8". 

Ruling: The height shall be recorded at 12' 2%". 



Annual Meeting Speaker 



Athletics In The High School 

By Coach Chester Caddas 

Many critics of today's modern educa- 
tion use the athletics of the school system 
as a basis for much of their criticism. We 
will admit that many schools handle their 
athletic programs in a manner that might 
brirtg criticism. There is no need for this 
type of situation ever to come about. Most 
school administrators and coaches co-op- 
( Continued on Page Twelve) 




Sam Burke 

Executive Secretary Sam Burke of the 
Georgia High School Association, who is 
currently President of the National Federa- 
tion of State High School Athletic Associa- 
tions, will be the principal speaker at the 
Annual Dinner Meeting of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association. Mr. 
Burke will speak on the subject, "Some 
Problems In High Sohool Athletics." 

Mr. Burke, who was born in Hampton, 
Virginia, had his college work at William 
and Mary College, the United States Naval 
Academy, and the University of South 
Carolina. He taught and coached at Albany 
(Georgia) High School for the 1927-33 per- 
iod, he was Principal and Coach at Greens- 
boro (Georgia) High School for the next six 
years, and he had administrative duties as 
Principal and Superintendent at Thomaston 
(Georgia) from 1939 until 1946. He has 
been Executive Secretary of the Georgia 
High School Association for the past seven- 
teen years. 

Numerous dvic and educational honors 
have come to Mr. Burke, and he has been 
an active figure on the national scene in 
athletics for a long period of time. He is 
an advisory member of the National Track 
Committee, is a member of the National 
Secondary Girls Basketball Rules Commit- 
tee, and since 1944 he has represented Sec- 
tion 3 on the Executive Committee of the 
National Federation. He has been a mem- 
ber of the National Federation Football 
Rules Committee for fourteen years. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1963 



For 1963-64 School Year 

An Excellent Student and Athletic 

Accident Coverage 

Local Agency Service 

Prompt and Fair Claim Administration 



Hte> KisiXfdei^ Go^Kfiaiuf^ 



W. E. KINGSLEY 



CENTRAL BANK BLDG. 



J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. 
Life Department 

LEXINGTON, KY. 



GENERAL AGENT 
CHARLES C. PRICE 

PHONE 2-8522 



Athletics In The High School 

(OoTittinued from Page Eleven) 

erate in a manner that makes the athletic 
program an integral part of the overall 
school program. In the next paragraph, I 
will try to bring out some of the many 
values to be derived from athletics. 

When the school term opens in August, 
no other factor can unify the interest of 
the student body like the first game of the 
new football season. This brings the stu- 
dents together after a summer of diversi- 
fied interests. The pep rallies provide an 
opportunity for the student body to take an 
active part in the school athletic program. 
The fever in the air that affects students, 
teachers, and citizens during a basketball 
tournament, is a wonderful part of athletics. 
I have found that successful athletics give 
the students a feeling of pride that is not 
matched in any other phase of school work. 
Many people can remember the performance 
of their school athletic teams more vividly 
than any other part of their school activ- 
ities. 

There are many specific^ individual val- 
ues to be gained through athletics. No other 



part of our school activities offers the 
challenges that are available in athletics. 
We feel that athletics offer a boy a chance 
to use his physical talents to any degree 
that he so desires. Greatness in athletics 
can be achieved only through great effort 
and persistence on the part of an individual. 
A person who achieves success will have 
proved to himself that he can meet any 
problem presented him during his life time. 
Many times the desire to perform in ath- 
letics can become a goad to the boy who is 
not overly interested in his school work. 
The boy will study enough to maintain his 
eligibility, even though his primary inter- 
est is athletics. We think the greatest value 
of athletics is that an athlete learns to take 
defeat and adversity and rise in spite of 
them. When a person learns to try again 
after defeat and failure he can never be 
defeated. Athletics in our schools provide 
the greatest practical example of life to be 
found, and any person who competes in 
athletics is better equix>ped to participate 
in the most serious game of all-life itself. 
— Fulton High School Kennel 



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Horse Shoes — 






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LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 



Many Thanks To You 



MANY THANKS to our many friends and customers who made our room 
their headquarters while in Louisville for the 1963 State High School 
Basketball Tournament and for the K. E. A. CJonvention. 

It was nice to have you and we appreciate the nice business that you 
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Now is the time for your year end awards and with banquets coming up, 
let us take care of your trophy and lettering needs. We have a com- 
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Please write or call for complete information and prices on all of your 
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Jr. will be glad to assist you. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

CH 7-1941 — PHONES — CH 7-1942 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



Wp ShipThp DaV You BuV 




High School Af Mete 



ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "A" CHAMPION-1963 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Dick Ward, Paul Schultz, Gene Englert, Bill Hayes, Earth Weigel, 
Dave Bowen, Gary Bray. Second Row: Mike McCabe, Greg Stebbins, Ken Leanhart, Dave Kremer, 
Jimmy Kraus, Billy Klarer, Greg Bierly. Third Row: Alan Wilkinson, Mike O'Bryan, Jimmy Wood. 
Don Hubbuch, Tommy Godfrey, Danny Glaser. Fourth Row: Bobby Yann, Fred Gerwing, Ricky 
Smith, Tommy Knopf, George McAuliffe, Fred Betz, Bob Godecker. Fifth Row: Tim Kute, Pat 
Callahan, Eddie Struss, Louie Lococo, Mike Harpring, Greg Meiman, Glenn Hubbuch. Sixth Row: 
Bruce Breitmeyer, Larry Johnson, Mike Koch. Tony Ambrose, Bill Ackerman, Mike Parks, Mike 
Kelly. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MAY - 1363 




WESTPORT HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "B" CHAMPION— 1963 




(Left to Right) Front Row: George Neumapn, Rusty Shelby, Howard Wilson, Jim Smith. Sec- 
ond Row: Joey Lawfer, George Lewis, Richard Mazy, Bob Spiegelhalter, Lin Warren. Third Row: 
Bob Webb, Andy Kiorpes, Danny Knopf, Steve Warren, Tom Ford, Johnny Thompson, Coach Greg 
Bobrow. 

SACRED HEART ACADEMY GIRLS' SWIMMING TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION-1963 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Mrs. Sally Roby (Coach), Jamie Gehring and Vicki Baker (Co- 
captains), Alice Driscoll (Ass't Coach). Second Row: Gloria Daniels, Sandy Pope, Mary McAuliffe, 
Debbie Miranda, Margie Goodwin, Sally Conway, Kristin Pfutzenreuter, Sue Rulander, Candy 
Downard. Third Row: Sherry Vetter, Linda Ericksen, Rosaline Koch, Peggy Wooldridge, Terry 
Diebold, Kathy Huter, Yolanda Crady, Mary Ann DeMuth, Barbara Mudd, Sharon Horton, Karen 
Gocke. Fourth Row: Cindy Canary, Vicki Smock, Mary Hunt, Bizzy Lancaster, Doris Tonini, 
Lynn Patterson. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Otticial Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XXV— NO. 10 



MAY, 1963 



.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The forty-sixth annual meeting of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
was held at the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, 
on Thursday afternoon, April 18, 1963. 

President K. G. Gillaspie called the meet- 
ing to order at 3:00, and asked the Com- 
missioner to call the roll of delegates. Fifty- 
eight regularly elected delegates or alter- 
nates answered the roll call. The following 
delegates were seated in the absence of the 
delegates, or alternates from their respec- 
tive districts: George Whitecotcon, D. 5 
Jackie Day, D. 16; Roy Reynolds, D. 18 
Eugene Clark, D. 40; Hillard Combs, D. 45 
Preston Parrett, D. 46. 

Brad Mutchler moved, seconded by Bow- 
man Davenport that the minutes of the 
1962 meeting of the Association, which had 
been sent previously to all member schools, 
be approved without being read. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a report 
on the activities of the Association during 
the 1962-63 school year (The report of the 
Commissioner appears elsewhere in this 
issue of the magazine). After giving his 
written report, the Commissioner announced 
that the 1962-63 M. J. Cavana Swimming 
Achievement Award had been won for the 
second straight year by the Highlands High 
School. 

President Gillaspie introduced to the 
Delegate Assembly Sherman Gish and Don 
Davis, recently elected to the Board of Con- 
trol for a period of four years, beginning 
July 1, 1963, and representing Sections 2 
and 5 respectively. 

President Gillaspie stated that considera- 
tion of proposals was the next order of 
business. 

Harold Miller moved, seconded by Clin- 
ton B. Ham-mons, that Proposal I, providing 
that "twenty" and "twenty-six" be substi- 
tuted for "twenty-four" and "thirty" res- 
pectively in the second sentence of By-Law 
21, this change not to take effect until the 
beginning of the 1965-66 school year, be 
adopted. The vote was 33-29 in favor of the 
proposal, but this was not the necessary 
two-thirds vote required for amending the 



By-Law, and the motion was declared lost. 

George Houston moved, seconded by Jam- 
es Caudill, that Proposal IL providing that 
all K. H. S. A. A. football, basketball, base- 
ball, and track contests shall be played un- 
der the National Federation rules, be adopt- 
ed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

John Heher moved, seconded by Roy N. 
Walters, that Proposal HL providing that 
"nineteenth" be substituted for "twentieth" 
in By-Law 4, this change to become effec- 
tive at the beginning of the 1966-67 school 
year, be adopted. The motion failed to carry 
by a vote of 29-32. 

Clinton B. Hammons moved, seconded 
by Paul Wright, that Proposal IV, provid- 
ing that a basketball official shall not work 
a district or regional tournament in the 
district or region in which he resides, be 
adopted. The motion carried by a vote of 
41-21, and the proposal was declared to be 
adopted. 

There being no further business. Presi- 
dent Gillaspie declared the meeting adjourn- 
ed. 

The dinner meeting of the Association 
was held in the Crvstal Ballroom of the 
Brown Hotel at 6:00 P.M., with 679 dele- 
gates and other school officials present. 
Recipient of the Game-Guy Award was 
David Leon Wood of the Park City High 
School. The presentation of the award was 
made by K. H. S. A. A. Director Ralph C. 
Dorsey. 

The address of the evening was given by 
Executive Secretary Sam Burke of the 
Georgia High School Association, who is 
currently President of the National Federa- 
tion of State High School Associations. Mr. 
Burke spoke on the subject, "Some Prob- 
lems in High School Athletics." He explain- 
ed the purposes and functions of the Na- 
tional Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations, after which he made 
a forceful presentation of the part which 
high school athletics is playing in modern 
education. He stated that several abuses in 
the field of high school sports have been 
detected from time to time in Georgia, 
(Continued on Page Seven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1963 



MAY, 1963 



VOL. XXV— NO. 10 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President K. G. Gillaspie (1959-63), Georgetown 

Vice-President Cecil A. Thornton (1960-64), Harlan 

Directors— Ralph C. Dorsey (1962-66), Horse Cave; Sherman 
Gish (1962-63). Greenville; Preston Holland (1961-65). Murray: 
Don R. Rawlings (1961-65). Danville: Foster J. Sanders (1962- 
66), Louisville: Gran C. Teater (1960-64). Pa'ntsville. 

Snbscription Rate $1.00 Per Year 

Jiom the Commissionei s CJffice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1962-63 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Attention, Principals! 

More than 200 principals of K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools have not as yet filed re- 
quests this school year for their insurance 
subsidies. If the school is underwriting all 
or part of insurance protection for its ath- 
letes, the Board of Control will allow a 
maximum credit or refund of $30.00 to ea^ch 
school for "all sports except football," and 
an additional credit or refund of $50.00 to 
each school maintaining a football team. 
Principals of schools which qualify for the 
credit or refund should write for reim- 
bursement forms at once. 

State Track Committee 

The State High School Track Meet, 
scheduled to be held in Lexington on May 
17-18, will be managed by John Gettler, Di- 
rector of City Recreation, Lexington. Other 
members of the committee are: Preston 
Holland, Murray ; George Claiborne, Owens- 
boro; Elvis Donaldson, Bowling Green; 
Scott Smith, Fort Knox: Emmett Goranflo, 
Middletown; Wayne Cooper, Louisville; 
Roy McKenney, Bellevue : Ken Snowden, 
Danville; Charles Black, Barbourville ; Ar- 
thur Mullins, Elkhorn City; and Ernie 
Chattin, Ashland. These regional managers 
will assist Mr. Gettler in conducting the 
State Meet. 

Golf Tournaments 

Sites of the eight regional golf tourna- 
ments were announced in the March issue 
of the ATHLETE. These tournaments will 
be managed by the following men: Coach 



Charles Davis, Caldwell County High 
School; Ath. Dir. Elvis Donaldson, Bowling 
Green High School; Ass't. Prin. Oz John- 
son, Valley High School; Coach Wid Elli- 
son, duPont Manual High School; Coach 
Walter R. Baulch, Holmes High School; 
Coach Elmer Gilb, Henry Clay High School; 
Ath. Dir. Bill Clark, Somerset High School; 
and Prin. Paul Trimble, Paintsville. The 
State Golf Tournament will be held at Fort 
Knox on May 21-22, and will be managed 
bv Ath. Dir. John Hackett of the Fort Knox 
High School. Principals who have not re- 
ceived their entry blanks should write to 
their respective managers for these forms. 

Tennis Tournaments 

There are eight regional tournaments 
for boys being held in tennis this year. 
Three of these tournaments are in the 
Louisville and Jefferson County area, all 
to be managed by Ath. Dir. Emmett Gor- 
anflo of the Eastern High School. The other 
tournaments are being managed by Coach 
Ted Hornback, Bowling Green; Scott Smith, 
Fort Knox ; Roger Klein, Bellevue ; Eugene 
Huff, Lexington; and Ath. Dir. Charles 
rlughes, Richmond. The State Tennis Tour- 
nament will be held in Bellevue on May 13- 
14, and will be managed by Mr. Klein. 

Six regional tennis tournaments for 
girls will have been conducted by the time 
this issue of the ATHLETE comes from 
the press. These tournaments were schedul- 
ed to be managed by Mrs. Tom Rowlett, 
Murray; Miss Betty Langley, Bowling 
Green ; Miss Margaret Sheegog, Louisville ; 
Mrs. Ann Sandusky, Middletown; Roger 
Klein, Bellevue ; and Eugene Huff, Lex- 
ington. The State Tennis Tournament for 
Girls will be held at Louisville on May 10- 
11. This tournament will be managed by 
Miss Margaret Sheegog, duPont Manual 
High School, Louisville. 

Fines for Late Reports 

Principals of more than 150 schools had 
not filed their reports on basketball of- 
ficials and their basketball participation 
(eligibility) lists for the 1962-63 season 
when this issue of the ATHLETE went to 
press. Some 800 basketball officials have 
not filed their reports on member sichools. 
The Board of Control has established a fine 
of $5.00 for both schools and officials de- 
linquent with their reports. A deadline of 
June 15 has been set for the filing of all 
reports required under association rules. 
Officials who have not worked any games 
should notify the K.H.S.A.A. office accord- 
ingly. Such notification is considered a re- 
port. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1963 



Page Three 



1963 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, February 23, 1963 

TEAM SCORING — CLASS "A" ' 



TEAM 



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St. Xavier 

Lafayette 

Trinity 

Atherton 

Waggener 

Bryan Station 

Seneca 

Eastern 

Ashland 

Henry Clay 



14 


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8 


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200 Yard Medley Relay — 
Finals 

1. St. Xavier (Finne^an, Koch, 
Kremer, AmbrOGe) 1 ;51.6 

2. Atherton (D. Terry, Benn, 

Rivers, Brooks) 1 :53.0 

3. Lafayette (Vry, Huebner, 
Wickman, M. Cooper) 1:54.1 

4. Trinity (Perry, J. Goodwin, 

R. Goodwin, L. Mudd) 1:57.9 

5. Bryan Station (Hash, Waymen, 

D. Hart, J. Huston) 2:05.3 

6. Seneca (Driver, Proctor, 

Kozlove, Feldbaum) 2:07.1 

St. Xavier set a new state record in 
this event with the time of 1 :51.6. 

2. 200 Yard Freestyle- 
Finals 



Bob Hartye, Trinity 

Tim Kute, St. Xavier 

Neil Benner, Atherton __. 
John Fuller, Bryan Statio 
Paul Clephas, St. Xavier . 
Sonny Wright, Trinity 



50 Yard Freestyle — 
Finals 

Eddie Struss, St. Xavier 

Robert Raisor, Bryan Station 

Bill Walker, Lafayette 

Gary Bray, St. Xavier 

Bud Horner, Waggener 

Greg Meiman, St. Xavier 



Dave Bowen, St. Xavier 

Bobby Yann, St. Xavier 

Mike Parks, St. Xavier 

Fancy Diving — 
Finals 

Ted Witte, Waggener 

Jim Cash, Atherton 

David Shell, Seneca 

Bob Cooper, Lafayette 

Charles Gorton, Lafayette 
Dave Brauner, Trinity 



00.7 
07.4 
12.7 
13.8 
14.1 



1. 



_2:18.1 6. Scotty Hash, Bryan Station __ 
_2:24.0 Vry set a new state record 

_2:27.1 event with his time of :59.5. 
_2:30.2 

.2:32.3 9. 400 Yard Freestyle- 
Finals 

1. Tim Kute, St. Xavier 

2. Frank Hartye, Trinity 

-318.25 3. Sonny Wright, Trinity 

.266.20 4. Logan Sturgeon, Atherton 

_243.45 5. Bobby Yann, St. Xavier 

_239.10 6. John Fuller, Bryan Station ._ 
„211.45 Kute set a new state record 
_210.60 event with his time of 4:21.7. 



100 Yard Butterfly- 
Finals 

Chris Rivers, Atherton 

Bill Ackerman, St. Xavier _ 

Dave Terry, Atherton 

Sandy Wickman, Lafayette 

Tom Godfrey, St. Xavier 

Richard Hill, Eastern 

100 Yard Freestyle — 
Finals 



10. 



42. a 

47.6 
52.0 
53.9 
this 



100 Yard Breaststroke — 
Finals 



1. Mike Koch, St. Xavier 1 :07.S 

2. Tony Ambrose, St. Xavier 1 :07.6 

3. Bob Walker, Lafayette 1:09.7 

4. Jim Goodwin, Trinity 1:12.5 

5. Rick Benn, Atherton 1 :12.5 

6. Rick Proctor, Seneca 1:13.0 

Koch and Ambrose tied in setting a 

new state record in this event with the 
time of 1:07.6. 



Str 
event with hij 

4. 200 Yard Individual Medley — 
Finals 

1. John Geiser, Waggoner 2 :16.9 



3. Frank Hartye, Trinity 

4. Mike Dorton, Waggener 

6. Neil Benner, Atherton 

6. Paul ClephaE, St. Xavier 

Walker set a new state record 
event with his time of :53.3. 

8. 100 Yard Backstroke — 
Finals 

1. John Vry, Lafayette 

2. John Geiser, Waggener 

3. Doug Shawk, Henry Clay 

4. Tom Finnegan, St. Xavier 

Dave Bowen, St. Xavier 



200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 
Finals 



Hi 11- 

53.9 
55.0 
55.8 1. St. Xavier (Bray, Ackerman, 

Hubbuch, Struss) 1 :38.^ 

59.5 2. Bryan Station (C. Hart, D. Hart, 
in this J. Huston, Rasor) 1 :44.5 

3. Trinity (Casper, Rueff, E. 
Goodwin, L. Mudd) 1:44.6 

4. Lafayette (Hudson, Nelson, 
Holladay, M. Cooper) 1 :47.5 

5. Ashland (Marcum, Czeskleba, 

- :59.5 Yancey, Sisler) 1 :4S.5 

_1 :02.2 6. Atherton (Wenton, Cummings, 



_1:07.7 this event with the time of 1:38.2. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1963 



University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, March 30, 1963 



TEAM SCORING — Class "B" 























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1. 200 Yard Medley Relay 
Finals 

1. Covington Catholic (J. Cobb, 
D. Hoppenjans, J- Grayson, 

D. Sweetl 2:04.4 

2. Highlands (T. Bush, C. Wilson, 

J. Jones. T. Reik) 2:04.5 

3. Berea Foundation (W. Olin. 
M. Williamson. G. Abrams. 

L. Grossman) 2:08.8 

4. Fort Knox (J. Whitley, K. 

Lucey, .T. Dowling, F. McDowell _2:10.2 

5. Hopkiniiville (T. Dorroh. W. 
Thurmond. C. Sallee, 

J. Primrose) 2:10.2 

6. Westport (B. Spiegelhalter, 
L. Warren, 

D. Knopf, A. Kiorpes 2-10.3 



2. 



200 Yard Freestyle 
Finals 



1. Howard Wilson, Westport 2 

2. Jim Wade, University 2 

3. Lee Bezold, Highlands 2 

4. Bill Richards, University 2 

5. George Neumann. Westport 2 

6. Tom Bootes, Highlands 2 

Wilson set a new state record in 

event with hiji time of 2:05.8. 

3. 50 Yard Freestyle- 
Finals 

1. Jeff Carmody. Fort Knox 

2. Beaver Jordan, Beechwood 

3. John Primrose, Hopkinsville 

4. Jim Cavana, Bellevue 

5. Rusty Shelby. Westport 

6. John Sims, Harrodsburg 



4. 200 Yard Individual Medley — 
Finals 

1. Richard Wade, University 2:18.3 

2. Mike Moreman, Lexington Oath. 2 :25.7 

3. Jim Smith, Westport 2:26.0 

4. Bob Blank. Covington Cath. 2:37.0 

5. Lee Bezold. Highlands 2:38.5 

6. Jim Ware, Beechwood 2:40.4 

Wade set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 2:18.3. 

5. Fancy Diving 

1. Jim Cavana, Bellevue 217.45 

2. Jerry Baker, Berea Foundation _198.35 

3. Tom Jones, Highlands 173.70 

4. Robert Wartman 
Covington Catholic 172.80 

5. Thomas O'Connor. 
Covington Catholic 164.80 

6. Marc Kuhnhein, Highlands 146.55 



Fort Knox — -1 :03.7 



:09.4 
:10.9 
;12.0 
;17.6 
;21.1 



6. 100 Yard Butterfly- 
Finals 

1. Richard Wade, University 

2. Howard Wilson, Westport _- 

3. Bill Richards. University __. 

4. Ron Major. Covington Cath. 

5. Steve Scharstein, Highlands 

6. Ken Grimm, Highlands 

In the third heat Wade set a i 

record in this event with the 
1:02.8. 





03.1 




06.6 




0H.5 




14.8 




17.1! 




22.8 


new s 


tate 



100 Yard Freestyle — 
Finals 



24.8 
24.9 
25.9 
25.9 
26.1 
26.6 4. Richard Mazy, Westport 



1. Rusty Shelby, Westport 

2. Jim Wade, University 

3. John Sims, Harrodsburg 1 



Paul Sumn 
Larry Gr 
Berea Foundatic 



100 Yard Backstroke — 
Finals 

Wayne Lyster, Bourbon County _1 :06.1 

Jim Smith, Westport 1:06.7 

Mike Moreman, Lexington Cath. 1 :08.5 

Jim Ware, Beechwood 1:10.2 

Jack Addams, Highlands 1 :11.7 

Jeff Cobb, Covington Cath. 1:14.7 



9. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 
Finals 

1. Claude Wikson, Highlands 1 :12.7 

2. George Neumann. Westport 1:13.5 

3. Dick Hoppenjans, 
Covington Catholic 1:15.4 

4. Ted Schroeder. Covington Cath. .1 :16.5 

5. Mike Williamson, 
Berea Foundation 1 :17.6 

6. Jeff Carmody, Fort Knox 1 :17.9 

Wilson set a new state record in this 

event with his time of 1:12.7. 

10. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay- 
Finals 

1. Beechwood (B. Baker, G. Baker, 

G. Allen, B. Jordan) 1:45.9 

"' 2. Covington Catholic (J. Gray- 
son, B. Blank, D. Sweet, 

B. Suedkamp) 1:47.4 

3. Fort Knox (F. McDowell, T. 
Wilbanks, P. Summerson, 

B. Irish) 1:48.4 

56.7 4. Hopkinsville (M. Zimmer. C. 

59.5 Sallee, J. Cohoon, R. Mabry) ___1 :52.0 

00.0 5. Westport (D. Knopf, J. Thomp- 

1.8 son, A Kiorpes, R. Mazy) 1 :53.1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1963 



Page Fire 



University of Kentuclcy Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, March 30, 1963 



TEAM SCORING — Girls' Meet 





>> 














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IS >i 


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O] s 




fed 


Spq 


se 


°m 


^m 


3' 


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10 


5 


12 


4 


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59 




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7 


1 6 


i ^ 


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39 




4 
6 


5 

7 






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23 




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i 


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17 





2 




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Fort Knox 














1 


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4 


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1 31/2 











3% 










2 

















2 







2 




















2 







1. 200 Yard Medley Relay 3- i'" 'l""J'']i. ^^^^f^^V V 

„. I 4. Beth Schaffield, Villa Madonna . 

''•"^'S 5. Trilby Lingenfelter, 

1. Lafayette (C. Boggs. J. Todd, Bryan Station 

Jr., Null, M. Lyons 2:09.8 6. Sandra Stone, Hopk^nsville 

2. Sacred Heart (S. Rulander. K. 4. 100 Yard Butterfly — 
Pfutzenreuter, J. Gehring, Finals 

3. lil.?"Ma7o*nn-a-(D;wTe-ck:-K.---'^''-° 1- Jl? w'aSe Uni^eSity^'^**' 

l.'^^Wint'^^nSnTl' 2:20.1 »'■ ?^/'^, ^onway'sa?;^ H^rt":: 

4. Westport (B. Skinner, M. *• J'" Stivers, Highlands 

Hawkes, C. Caignon, 5. Jan Pauline, Waggener 

Tj D „^«„ & ' 9 .99 1 6. Nancy Gilmore. Ashland 

K w;<.?!Ji,T iK~'r~r.rf^^^"T{ N"" set a new state record ii 

5. Highlands K. Coitman, U. ^„^„* «,:+i, k«.„ *;™„ „f i .it a 
Reed, C. Drake. C. Ney) 2:24.4 f "", ""!j, *•" 'iT "^ »* /i'^-S- 

6. Hopkinsville (L. Roberts, T. !>. 100 Yard Freestyle — 

Dade, J. Vanmeter, S. Dade 2:26.9 Finals 

Lafayette set a new state record in j Marvin Lyons, Lafayette 

this event with the time of 2 :09.8. j Margaret Goodwin, Sacred Herat 

2. 200 Yard Individual Medley- I jllfw^\ S^e'^hS"::::: 

Finals 5. Ann Wiglesworth, 

^ , _ ,,, n ,n n Loxington Catholic 

1- ^^^l .Benson. Westport 2 :40.8 5_ p^^ yf^^^_ University 

2. Jill Stivers, HighlanAi 2:45.5 c ,(jf) YarH RacUstrntp 

3. Margaret Goodwin, "• *"" >^^™ BackStroKe— 
Sacred Heart 2:47.8 Finals 

4. Ann Wiglesworth, 1. Charlene Boggs, Lafayette 

Lexington Catholic 2 :53.7 2. Sue Rulander, Sacred Heart 

5. Margo Wearon, Harrodsburg 2 :54.8 3. Bethea Black, Ashland 

6. Gloria Daniels, Sacred Heart —3:00.2 4. Debbie Reed, Highland 

o T^ T^- • 5- Nancy Jones, Highlands 

3. Fancy Diving — 6. Linda Roberts. Hopkinsville 

1. Vicki Baker, Sacred Heart 122.70 Boggs set a new state recrod ii 

2. Mary McAuiiffe, Sacred Heart -116.90 event with her time of 1:12.0. 



:13.9 
:15.1 
:16.9 
:21.4 
:23.4 
:25.2 
this 



1:19.6 
1:21.6 
1:28.1 
1 this 



7. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 

Finals 

1. Cynthia Caignon, Westport 1 :17.2 

2. Jeanne Todd, Lafayette 1:19.2 

3. Kathy Rettig, Villa Madonna —1:20.5- 

4. Mary Hawkes, Wetitport 1:28.1 

5. Kristin Pfutzenreuter, 

Sacred Heart 1 :30.8 

6. Candy Downard, 

Sacred Heart 1 :33.7 

In the fourth heat Caignon set a new^ 
state record In this event with the time 
of 1:15.6. 

8. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay 

Finals 

1. Sacred Heart (A. Gellelfinger, 
D. Miranda, V. Baker, 

J. Gehring) 2:02.8 

2. Highlands (K. Coffman, R. 

Cecil, J. BryGon, C. Ney) 2:07.0 

3. Ashland (A. Webb, J. Hager- 
man, K. Hagerman, 

N. Gilmore) 2:07.8 

4. Hopkinsville (C. Stone, M. 

Higgins, T. Dade, J. VanMeter) 2:09.5 

5. Fort Knox (G. Pitts, J. 
LeVasseur. S. Shenk, 

M. J. Carmody) 2:16.3 

6. Villa Madnona (M. Wiecks. 
D. Reindiere, B. Schaffield, 

A. Beckman) 2:20.1 

Sacred Heart set a new state record in 
this event with the time of 2:02.8. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1963 



The Flying Dutchman 

Sam Burke, "The Georgia Peach," made 
the best case for high school athletics this 
Dutchman has ever heard when he spoke at 
the annual dinner of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association. Sam, who is 
also President of the National Federation of 
High School Athletic Associations, as well 
as chief of the high school athletic pro- 
gram in Georgia, had "bells rimging all over 
the Brown's Crystal Ball Room." He sold 
Kentuckians on the idea of getting our ath- 
letic programs off the defensive and on the 
offensive by publicizing the social and edu- 
cational training stimulated through whole- 
some competition. So — Let's get with it! 

Enthusiasm and good fellowship rivaled 
the size of the dinner crowd which spilled 
over into the corridors at this popular ban- 
quet. When hundreds of Kentucky's school 
men and women gather with coaches and 
officials as the K. H. S. A. A. rolls out the 
red carpet at this annual affair, the Dutch- 
man can only say again, "It's a privilege to 
be a part of Kentucky's high school athletic 
program." 

When Caverna's genial Ralph Dorsey be- 
gan his introduction of David Wood, Ken- 
tucky's Game Guy of 1963,, that throng of 
banqueteers stood and applauded in honor 
and respect of this courageous youngster. 
They remained standing until Ralph had 
made the presentation of the Game Guy 
trophy to the Park City lad. David had 
captivated the hearts of all Kentuckians 
with his achievements in football, basket- 
ball, and track, in spite of a childhood acci- 
dent which severely damaged both his feet. 
David wanted everybody to know that his 
principal, W. L. Gardner, is a man among 
men because he goes that "extra mile" to 
help troubled kids. His Coach, Al Ellison, 
and his parents came in for their share of 
liis praise, as well as the K. H. S. A. / 
Coincidences are funny things ! David's Dad 
and Mother were seated by the Dutchman 
when Mr. Wood remarked that he had play- 
ed for Fountain Run against Tompkinsville 
in a basketball game which the Dutchman 
had refereed ma"^"^ ^-'-^rs ago. He wondered 
if Dutchie remembered. 

The Dutchman remembered — and hov 
The game was played in 1933 on Fountain 
Run's outdoor court. Tim Lee Carter, now 
a Doctor, was coaching Tompkinsville, and 
Roy Hawk, Fountain Run's principal and 
coach, paid me $1.00 to work the game. 
That's all that was collected for the referee 
when the hat was passed. 

Buechel's Edgar A. Smith, well-known a- 




iHE DUTCHMAN 

cross Kentucky as a football and basketball 
official, has reflected credit on our State. 
The American Association of Health, Phy- 
sical Education, and Recreation has chosen 
him to receive the Honor Award For Rec- 
reation for the Southern States for his work 
on the playgrounds of Jefferson County. 
Edgar, a noted golfer who could clobber 
Briscoe Inman, Harry Stephenson, Bill Nau, 
and Edgar McNabb on any given day, will 
receive his award in Minneapolis in May 
(Dissenting comments are expected from 
the above-named golfers.) 

The Dutchman met with the National 
Basketball Rules Committee this Spring. 
The few minor changes will be helpful to 
officials in the administration of games — 
but they demand better-trained timers and 
scorers. Cliff Fagan, Executive head of the 
National Federation, led the 5-Man High 
School Representative group sitting on the 
Committee. You have to see this man Fagan 
work to really appreciate his ability. The 
chap is a combination of brains, logic, de- 
termination, and personality. The Nation's 
high schools are lucky to have Cliff. In the 
Dutchman's book, he's great. 

Ashland's Courtney Clark gets the Corn 
Cob Pipe of Honor Award for April. Court- 
ney's work with young people, plus the help 
he gives continually to the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Program, make him the 
winner. Presently, Courtney is running 
down a story on Kermit Blosser for the 
Dutchman. You'll read that one in the first 
issue of The Athlete this September. 

Evart's Charlie Hunter and Lone Jack's 
Chester Click have recommended that Cleo- 
phus Pursifull of Bell County High School 
get a Corn Cob Pipe for unselfish service. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1963 



Page Seven 



Cleo is recommended regularly by some- 
body every month — but he won the award 
in 1961. Thanks Charlie and Ches for your 
interest in a great Kentuckian ! 

Has your school community set up a 
playground program for the summer? DO 
IT NOW— IF YOU NEED HELP, CALL 
THE FLYING DUTCHMAN. 



ANNUAL MEETING MINUTES 

(Continued from Page One) 
and possibly in Kentucky and the other 
states; but that he was glad to point to 
certain things of which high school ath- 
letics are guilty which might be on the 
credit side of the ledger. He believed that 
these items of "guilt" in recent years were 
better sportsmanship, better coaching, bet- 
ter equipment and facilities, and higher 
requirements for eligibility. Mr. Burke said 
that surveys made in his state indicated 
that athletics paid their own way in most 
school systems, and that less school time 
was lost by athletes than by students rep- 
resenting their schools in other types of 
activities. He said that better public rela- 
tions and more publicity concerning school 
athletic programs and the :ontributions 
which they make to school and community 
life should he a primary concern of school 
administrators and coaches. 



1962-63 ANNUAL REPORT 

(Presented to Delegate Assembly) 

Four hundred twenty-five schools join- 
ed the Association during 1962-63. This is 
one less than the number of schools enroll- 
ed in 1961-62. One hundred sixty-one 
schools had eleven-man football teams, and 
eleven played eight-man football. This is an 
increase of eight eleven-man teams over 
1961-62. 

Financial reports filed by the sixteen 
regional basketball tournament managers 
show total receipts of $145,015.55. Receipts 
from the sixty-four district basketball 
tournaments amounted to $218,021.36. Re- 
ceipts from ticket sales at the State Basket- 
ball Tournament, including state tax, will 
approximate $168,000.00. Profit to the As- 
sociation on the tournament will be close to 
$124,000.00. A complete record of all re- 
ceipts and disbursements will appear in a 
subsequent issue of the Association maga- 
zine. 

Thirteen hundred nineteen basketball 
officials and 454 football official Is register- 
ed with the Association in 1962-63. Nine 
football rules clinics were held under the 
direction of Edigar MioNabb, and fifty-three 
football officials took the National Federa- 



tion examination for the higher ratings. Of 
this number, eleven were added to the "cer- 
tified" list, and there were twenty-two of- 
ficials on the "approved" list. Charlie Vetti- 
ner, veteran trainer of officials, conducted 
fifteen basketball clinics, and held the 
School for Basketball Officials. Additional 
meetings and clinics were held by the 
regional representatives who continue to 
render a fine service to the officials and 
schools in their respective areas. Seventy- 
eight officials took the National Federation 
basketball examination with eighteen be- 
ing added to the "certified" list and thirty- 
nine receiving the "approved" rating. 

One member school was suspended from 
the Association and three were placed on 
probation during the current school year. 
The schools placed on probation were con- 
sidered guilty of violating K.H.S.A.A. By- 
Law 17, the Association's Sportsmanship 
Rule. 

The football playoffs, in their fourth 
season, continued to create interest in the 
sport. The Board of Control set up districts 
in four regions during 1962. Eight of the 
ten regions in the three classes will have 
districts in 1963. 

Eight regional cross country runs were 
held on October 27 for the purpose of 
qualifying teams and individuals for the 
state event, which was held in Lexington on 
November 10. Interest in this sport con- 
tinues to increase. 

Ten schools sent entries to the Class A. 
Section of the State Swimming meet, held 
in Lexington on February 23. Twelve 
schools sent entries to the Class B Section 
of the State Swimming Meet, held in Lex- 
ington on March 30. The second State 
Swimming Meet for Girls, held in conjunc- 
tion with the Class B Meet for Boys, at- 
tracted entries from fifteen schools. Swim- 
ming is now probably the fastest growing 
sport sponsored by the K.H.S.A.A. 

The numbers of teams representing their 
schools in track and baseball appear to have 
leveled off. One hundred ninety-nine schools 
will send teams to the twelve regional 
track meets. Fifty district tournaments 
have been set up for baseball, to accommo- 
date the 306 teams which will enter the 
tournaments. There will be ninety-seven 
schools with golf teams, fifty-eight with 
boys' tennis teams, and thirty-seven with 
girls' tennis teams. 

Principals of eleven schools have indi- 
cated their interest in the Rifle Marksman- 
ship Championship, scheduled to be held at 
M.M.I. April 27. Representatives of several 
schools have indicated an interest in wrest- 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1963 



ling, and it is probable that this sport will 
be sponsored by the Association in the near 
future. 

Working with the K.H.S.A.A., the 
School Health Committee of the Kentucky 
State Medical Association has conducted 
seven athletic injury convention conferences 
within the past year. In a summary report 
the committee stated that 40 per cent of 
those in attendance were coaches, 40 per 
cent were students, 14 per cent were 
school officials, and 6 per cent were physic- 
ians. Although the attendance at some of 
the meetings was low, it was felt by all of 
those present at the clinics that much good 
was accomplished. It is hoped that the 
State Medical Association will find it poss- 
ible to continue this service to Association 
member schools during 1963-64. Adminis- 
trators and coaches are urged to give their 
assistance to this very worthwhile project. 

The excellent cooperation of numerous 
school men in the state, working with the 
Commissioner, the Assistant Commissioner, 
and the Board of Control has made poss- 
ible the expanding program of the K.H.S. 
A. A. This assistance is appreciated very 
much. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the Jentucky 
Hotel, Louisville, on Friday morning, April 19, 1963. 
The meeting was called to order by President K. 
G. Gillaspie at 9:30, with all Board members. Com- 
missioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Assistant Com- 
missioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Oran C. 
Teater that the reading of the minutes of the 
March 15th meeting be waived since members of 
the Board had received copies of these minutes. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner gave a brief report on the 
state basketball tournament receipts and expenses. 
He stated that total receipts, including ticket sales, 
program profits, and radio fees, would exceed $170,- 
000.00, and he estimated that profits to the As- 
sociation will be a figure close to $125,000.00. 

There was a discussion concei-ning basketball re- 
districting. Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Fos- 
ter J. Sanders, that for 1963-64 Union County be 
moved from District 10 to Distrcit 9. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner presented a report of the 
School Health Committee of the Kentucky State 
Medical Association concerning the athletic injury 
prevention conferences which had been sponsored 
jointly by the committee and the K. H. S. A. A. 
durirg the current school year. Although attendance 
at the clinics had not been what was expected, it 
was the opinion of all Board members that much 
good had been accomplished in the meetings, and 
the Commissioner was authorized to request the 
Kentucky State Medical Association to set up as 
many injury prevention clinics as possible for the 
forthcoming 1963-64 school year. There was a gen- 



eral discussion concerning how more publicity might 
be given to the clinics. 

The Commissioner read a letter which he had 
received from Supt. Lewis Baker of Union County 
Schools, requesting that the Morganfield High 
School and the Sturgis High School be allowed to 
merge their athletic teams and be authorized to 
play under the name of Union County High School 
for the 1963-64 school year, although the new Union 
County High School building, now under construction, 
would not be ready for occupancy during the year. 
Mr. Baker had filed letters with a similar request 
from the principals of the schools in the Big Eight 
Conference. The Commissioner stated that he had 
advised Mr. Baker that K. H. S. A. A. regulations 
do not allow such plan of merging athletic programs 
to be put into effect, but that he wanted to take 
the correspondence on the case to the Board of 
Control in an effort to determine whether or not 
the members of the Board might have any sugges- 
tions concerning how the plan mentioned could be 
followed. It was the opinion of all members of the 
Board that the Commissioner had ruled correctly 
on the case. 

Preston Holland, at a previous Board meeting, 
had suggested an amendment to the Dickinson Sys- 
tem for the football playoffs which might increase 
the scheduling of games between teams in different 
districts of the same region and classification. After 
a general discussion, Preston Holland moved, sec- 
onded by Cecil A. Thornton, that the following para- 
graph be added to Section III of the Dickinson Foot- 
ball Rating System as used by the K. H. S. A. A.: 
"A team undefeated in its district, which has play- 
ed at least three games with teams in its district, 
shall rank above all teams in its district which it 
has defeated." The motion was carried unanimously. 

Ralph C. Dorsey moved, seconded by Preston 
Holland, that wrestling be added to the list of sports 
sponsored by the K. H. S. A. A., and that the 
Commissioner be authorized to set up tournaments 
leading to a championship in this sport. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

Upon recommendation of the Commissioner, Cecil 
A. Thornton moved, seconded by Oran C. Teater, 
that the insurance subsidy for each Association 
member school for 1963-64 be a basic amount of 
$40.00, with an additional subsidy of $60.00 for each 
school maintaining football. The motion was can'ied 
unanimously. 

Don R. Rawling.3 stated that several school rep- 
resentatives had questioned the seating of the al- 
ternates at the business meeting of the Association 
when the regularly elected delegate or alternate of 
the district involved was not present at the meeting. 
He asked the Commissioner for an interpretation of 
Article IV, Section 2-b of the K. H. S. A. A. Con- 
stitution, with respect to the membership of the 
Delegate Assembly. The Commissioner stated that 
the policy of allowing each district to be represent- 
ed at the annual meeting by some person present 
other than the elected delegate and alternate was 
one of long standing, but that the wording and in- 
tent of the rule mentioned were very clear, namely, 
that only delegates or alternates elected by ballot, 
as provided in Article IV, Section 2-b, of the K. H. 
S. A. A. Constitution, are eligible to represent their 
respective districts at the annual meeting. Don R. 
Rawlings moved, seconded by Foster J. Sanders, 
that the interpretation of the rule involved, given 
by the Commissioner, be confirmed by the Board of 
Control, and that only duly elected delegates or al- 
ternates be seated at the annual meeting of the As- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1963 



Fage Nine 



sociation. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by Sherman 
Gish, that the summer meeting of the Board of 
Control be held at Kentucky Dam Village late in 
July, preferably on the third or fourth week end if 
lodging arrangements for either of these dates 
could be made by the Commissioner. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Don R. Raw- 
lings, that Sherman Gish and Ralph C. Dorsey be 
delega,te and alternate respectively to the forthcom- 
ing summer meeting of the National Federation of 
State High .School Athletic Associations. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner read a letter from Secretary 
Joe O'hr of the Kentucky High School Coaches As- 
sociation, requesting sanction, on behalf of his Ex- 
ecutive Committee, of the 1964 and 1965 All-Star 
football and basketball games, sponsored annually 
by the Kentucky High School Coaches Association. 
Oran C. Teater moved, seconded by Ralph C. Dorsey, 
that the sanctions requested by Mr. Ohr be given. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

Sherman Gish moved, seconded by Foster J. 
Sanders, that all bills of the Association for the 
period beginning March 15, 1963, and ending April 
18, P63, be approved. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 

Baseball Questions^ — Installment 2 

EDITOR'S NOTE: These rulings do not set aside nor 
modify any rule. They are interpretations of some 
of the early season situations which have been 
presented. 

22. Play: With Rl on 2nd base, B2 hits safely 
to left field. F4 obstructs B2, who is advancing to 
2nd base. F7 throws to F2, who tags Rl out at 
home b'se. F2 relays ball to F6, who tags B2 
out at 2nd base. 

Ruling: Rl is out. After runner ceases to ad- 
vance, the umpire declares the ball dead and awards 
B2 2nd base. 

23. Play: With 1 out, Rl is on 2nd base and 
R2 on 1st base. B4 hits safely and Rl and R2 advance 
to home base. B4 is tagged out by F5 at 3rd base. 
In advancing Rl failed to touch home base. F2 ap- 
peals on Rl at home base. 

Ruling: Appeal on Rl is allowed and is considered 
the 2nd out of the inning. Since R2 touched boms base 
before B4 was tagged out at 3rd, which is considered 
as being the 3rd out, R2 scores. 

24. Play: Rl is on 2nd base and R2 on 1st base, 
with none out. After preparing to bunt, B3 attempts 
to punch the ball over F3. Punching swing by R3 re- 
sults in a looper which goes no more than 10 to 15 
feet in the air. Can this be ruled an infield fly? 

Ruling: The infield fly rule does not define how 
high the ball must go. Since B3 did not legitimately 
attempt a bunt, the umpire would declare it an 
infield fly if an infielder could catch it with reason- 
able effort. 

25. Play: Team A appears on the field wearing 
uniforms which have one notch at the end of each 
sleeve and there is piping forming a border around 
the bottom of the sleeve and notch. Are these uniforms 
illegal ? 

Ruling: No. The revision in Rule 1-1-5 prohibiting 
sleeves from being ragged, frayed or slit was not 
intended to prohibit a notched sleeve. The revision 
was for the purpose of prohibiting players from hav- 
ing sleeves which are tattered and torn. Pitchers have 



27. Play: In the 1st half of the 1st inning, 
the defensive team has requested and been charged 
with one conference and Fl remains on the mound. 
After one run has scored, the coach requests, through 
the umpire, that Fl and F8 exchange positio.'.s. The 
first three pitches F8 delivers to B5 are balls and 
then the coach is granted time for a second conference. 
Must F8 now be removed from the mound because of a 
second charged conference in an inning? 

Ruling: No. The umpire erred in granting the 
request for a second conference. When his error is 
discovered, the umpire should order play to continue 
until B7 completes his turn at bat, or the half-inning 
is ended. 

28. Play: Line drive hit by Bl strikes 3rd base 
coacher in his box and goes in flight to fair territory 
in front of 3rd base. It this a fair ball? 

Ruling: No. A batted ball becomes a foul as 
soon as it touches a person, or object, other than the 
ground while it is on or over foul ground. 

29. Play: With Rl, R2 and R3 on 3rd, 2nd, and 
1st bases, respectively, 2 out and a 3-2 count or. B6, 
Fl throws a high pitch. B6 swings and misses the 
ball, which gets past F2 and lodges in the umpire's 
mask. All three base runners advance across home 
base before the ball is recovered. Do these runs 
score? 

Rulnig: Only Rl scores. Ball becomes dead im- 
mediately when it lodges i.n the mask of the umpire 
and each base runner is awarded one bass. With less 
than 2 out and 1st base occupied, had this situation 
occurred B6 would be out on the strike-out and each 
base runner would be awarded or^ie base. 

30. Play: Bl breaks his bat when he hits to 
F5. As F5 is about to field the ball, the large part 
of the bat comes spinning toward 3rd base and hits 
the ball again sending it into: (a) foul ground; 
or (b) left field. 

Rulir.g: In (a), it is a foul ball unless it was 
touched in fair territory by a fielder or bounded to 
foul ground after being on fair territoy past 3rd 
base. In (b), it is a fair ball. In either case, the bat- 
ter cannot be called out for his bat hitting the ball 
a second time since the act is not intentional nor was 
the bat carelessly dropped or thrown in such a way 
as to strike the ball. 

31. Play: Bl hits a fair ball along the right 
foul line. While the ball is over fair territory, F9, at- 
tempting a catch, deflects it from his glove irto foul 
territory where it lands in the stands. 

Ruling: Bl is awarded 2rjd base and credited with 
a 2-base hit. 

32. Play: Rl and R2 are on 3rd base and 2nd 
base, respectively, with 1 out. B4 attempts to bunt 
and pops ball into the air between the 3rd base line 
and the pitching mound. Fl runs to catch the ball 
but he barely touches it with the tip of his glove 
and the ball falls to the ground. His momentum 
carries him to the base path where he collides with 
Rl. F5 grabs the ball and tags Rl, who is stretched 
out on the ground. R2 reaches 3rd base safely and 
B4 advances to 2nd base. 

Ruling: This is obstruction by Pi, therefore, 
Rl is awarded home base. Ball did not become 
dead at time of the infraction. R2 and B4 were not 
affected in any way by the obstruction and they ad- 
vance at their own risk. 

33. Play: With Rl on 1st base, B2 hits to the 
outfield. F8 throws his glove and hits the ball with 
it: (a) after B2 touches 1st base; or (b) before B2 
reaches 1st base. 

Ruling: In (a), award Rl and B2 home base and, 
in (b) award Rl home base and B2 3rd base. In both 
(a) and (b), the umpire signals the infraction but 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1963 



worn such sleeves to distract the batter's attention. 

26. Play: With Rl on 2nd base and R2 on 1st 
base, B3 hits fly ball to center field. The fly which 
is not caught is fielded by F9 who throws wildly 
toward 3rd base and into the dugout. When ball 
leaves hand of F9: (a) Rl and R2 are beyond 2nd 
base and B3 is beyond 1st base; or (b) Rl holds at 
2nd base but R2 and B3 are beyond 1st base. 

Ruling: In (a), award Rl and R2 home base and 
B3 3rd base. In (b), Rl is awarded home base, R2 3rd 
base, and B3 2nd base. 

the ball does rot become dead immediately. If Rl and 
B2 each reach the bases they would be awarded or 
advance beyond these bases, the penalty is disregard- 
ed. Otherwise, the umpire awards 3 bases to each 
runner (including batter-runner). If the awards are 
to be made, the ball becomes dead when time is taken 
to make the awards. 

34. Play: Fl, who is to pitch for the home team, 
arrives at the field as game is about to begin. The 
home team coach hoping to give his pitcher time to 
warm up, notifies the umpire the home team will bat 
first. Is this permissible ? 

Ruling: No. The high school rules have always 
provided that the visiting team must bat first. 

35. Play: Rl is in a "rundown" between 3rd base 
and home base and F5 throws to F2. The throw is 
wide and F2, with his mask in his right hand, reaches 
far to his right to catch the ball in his mask. He then 
tag's Rl out. Is this a legal act? 

Ruling: No. Whenever a fielder touches a live 
thrown ball with detached player equipment, each 
base imnner is awarded 2 bases from the base legally 
occupied at the time of the infraction. In this situa- 
tion, Rl is awarded home base. 

36. Play: The team at bat sends SI in to bat 
for F2. After the team's tur.-: at bat, it is decided to 
leave SI, who has just pinch hit for F2, in the game. 
S2 replaces F2. In what position do these players bat? 

Ruling: SI, who went into the game as a pinch 
hitter for F2 must continue to bat in place of F2. S2 
must bat in position of Fl in the batting order. 

37. Play: The plate umpire repeatedly places 
his right hand on the catcher's side or back while 
crouching behind him. 

Ruling: An umpire who does this uses poor 
mechanics. At no time during the game is it considered 
proper for an umpire to purpo.>ely touch any player. 
This procedure, when the catcher is fielding, could 
be intei-preted as umpire interference. 

38. Play: Rl is on 2nd base and the count on the 
batter is 3 balls and 2 strikes. Durir.g the next de- 
livery, Rl advances toward 3rd base in a steal. The 
pitch, which B2 attempts to avoid, touches him on the 
shoulder. 

Ruling: Since B2 was struck by the pitched ball, 
he is awarded 1st base rather than a base on balls. 
The ball becomes dead immediately when it hits B2 
and Rl must return to 2nd base. 

39. Play: Rl is on 3rd base and R2 is on 2nd 
base with none out. B3 hits ground ball to F6. Rl 
tries for home base on the play but is trapped. During 
the run-down, R2 advances to 3rd base and B3 to 
2nd base. When the ball gets away from F5, Rl 
returns to 3rd base safely. R2 returj^is safely to 2nd 
base and B3 to 1st base, respectively. Are runners 
permitted to return to a base once they have touched 
the next base ? 

Ruling: Yes. Runners are permitted to return to 
a base in a play of this type. There is no penaltv in- 
volved for running bases in the reverse order when a 



player is forced to return. 

40. Play: With Rl on 2nd base, R2 on 1st base 
and none out. B3 bunts a fair ball along the 1st base 
foul line. F2 and F3 converge on the ball which is 
fielded by F2. Throw by F2 to F4. covering 1st base, 
strikes B3 in the back while he is advancing on the 
foul line the last half distance to 1st base. Before 
the ball is retrieved, Rl has crossed home base and 
R2 has reached 3rd base with B3 on 2nd base. 

Ruling: The umpire should call B3 out as soon 
as he is hit by F2's throw and order R2 and Rl to 
return to the bases they occupied at the time of the 
pitch. Had B3 been running completely within the pro- 
vided three-foot lane, no infraction would have oc- 
cun-ed and the result of the piay would stand. 

41. Play: With Rl on 1st base, ground ball is 
batted by B2 to F6 and it appears as if a double 
play will result. F6 throws to F4 for the force o.i Rl, 
but relay by F4 disappears inside the shirt of Rl, who 
is the retired runner. Rl made no attempt to interfere. 

Ruling: The umpire will call "time" and award 
B2 1st base. Rl did not interfere. Had Rl deliberately 
attempted to get in the way of the throw and, as a 
result of his actio.i obviously hindered a double play 
at 1st base, the umpire would be justified in calling 
the batter-runner (B2) out also. 



Attention, Coaches! 

The National Athletic Trainers Association An- 
nual Convention and Clinic will be held at the Shera- 
ton-Gibson Hotel, Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 10-12, 
1963. Registration fee will be $5.00. High school 
coaches are invited to attend. There will be approxi- 
mately sixteen lecturers, including College, Pro- 
fessional and High School Trainers and outstanding 
physicians in the field of athletics. 



K. H. S. C. A. 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Held in Lexington, April 10, 1963 

Members of the executive board present were: 
Richard Greenwell, Shelbyville, President; Robert 
Wright, Ashland, Vice-President; Joe Ohr, Ii'vine, 
Secretary-Treasurer; Charlie Kuhn, Hale, Sgt.-at- 
Arms. 

It was suggested that the Lexington Quarterback 
Club be contacted regarding the promoting of the 
All-Star Games. It was the unanimous vote that the 
manager of the All-Star Games be elected a.nnually 
and that no manager serve more than three consecu- 
tive years. 

The executive committee instructed Secretary Joe 
Ohr to secure an insurance policy covering the All- 
Star players, preferably a non- deductible policy. 

The executive committee recommended that the 
participating playei's be honored with a banquet on 
the night preceding the game. This banauet could be 
held at a downtown hotel. Awards should be presented 
at this banquet. 

The schools are attempting to up grade the 
athletic program and the scholastic program of the 
individual schools and feel that the officials associa- 
tions should do the same and that the Executive Com- 
mittee recommends to the Commissioner of the K. H. 
S. A. A. that the State of Kentucky be divided into 
areas and that qualified observers repi-esent these 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1963 



Page Eleven 



areas and report to the Commissioner the quality 
of officiating observed. A rating sheet should be sent 
from the representative of the area to the Commis- 
sioner, and these ratings should determine the as- 
signments for tournaments and piay-off games. These 
observers are to be paid by the Commissioner's office 
of the K.H.S.A.A. 

The executive committee chose Joe Ohr, Irvine 
High School, Irvine, Kentucky, to be hoKiored by the 
Athletic Enterprises in having the 1963-1964 Coaches' 
Directory dedicated to him. 



Reports of Audits 

Irvine, Kentucky 
April 15, 1963 
Executive Committee 

Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 
Gentlemen: 

Upon instructions from Mr. Joe Ohr, your Sec- 
retary, I have examined the records of Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association account for the period 
March 5, 1962 to March 12, 1963. 

All transactions during this period are shown on 
the accompanying schedule of receipts and disburse- 
ments. Receipts have been traced into the Bank and 
all disbursements have been substantiated by can- 
celed checks. 

This schedule, in my opinion, properly reflects 
receipts and disbursements for the period shown. 
The balance of $8,088.61 has been confirmed as bei,'; 
on deposit in the Union Bank & Trust Company, 
Irvine, Kentucky, as of March 12, 1963. 
Your Very Truly, 
WILLIAM SEXTON, JR. Auditor 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOC. 
STATEMENT OF RECEIPTS & DISBURSEMENTS 
FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 5, 1962--MARCH 12, 1963 

RECEIPTS: 

Bank Balance March 5, 1962 $ 7,044.22 

Membership Dues $.1,312.00 

Grant from K.H.S.A.A 500.00 1,812.00 

Total $ 8,856.22 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

E. R. Smith, P. M. Postage. _$ 89.00 

Luckett Florists- 

McRight funeral 16.55 

Caverna Board Education- 
Stationery 4.75 

Estill Herald-Printing 41.55 

Joe Ohr-Delegate to KEA 25.00 

Sexton Ins. Agency-Audit 15.00 

Sports Center- 
Coach of Year Awards 82.40 

Sexton Ins. Agency- 

Treas., Bond 31.25 

Hart County Herald- 
Printing 18.23 

Kentuckian Hotel- 
All Star Hdq. 97.38 

Joe Ohr- 

Mileage, meals All Star 16.50 

Secretary of State- 

Corp. fee 2.00 

Joe Ohr- 

Collection fee (1312) 328.00 

Total Disbursements $ 767.61 

BALANCE $ 8,088.61 



Balance in Union Bank & Trust 

Company, Irvine, Kentucky, per 

bank statement of March 12, 1963 $ 8,088.61 

Irvine, Kentucky 
April 15, 1963 

Executive Committee 

East- West All Star Football & Basketball Games of 
Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
Louisville, Kentucky 

Gentlemen: 

Ujwn instruotion from Mr. Joe Ohr, your Sec- 
retary, I have examined the records of the All- Stare 
account submitted to me by Mr. Ohr, for the period 
March 14, 1962 to March 14, 1963. 

The various transactions for the above period are 
shown on the accompanying schedule of receipts and 
disbursements. The balance of $26,214.33 as of March 
13, 1963, has been confirmed as being on deposit in 
the First Security National Bank & Trust Company, 
Lexington, Kentucky. 

The total receipts of $13,508.00 have been traced 
into the bank and all disbursements of $5,168.31 have 
been properly substantiated by canceled checks. 

The receipts aaid disbursements shown in this 
schedule appear to be correct and, in my opinion, 
clearly reflect all the transactions for the period 
covered. 

In addition to the above balance, there is on 
deposit in the Columbia Federal Savings & Loan As- 
sociation, Covington, Kentucky, in your Accouat No. 
9315 a balance of $4,202.54 as of March 28, 1963. This 
is substantiated by a letter from the Savings Associa- 
tion to Mr. Ohr. 

I might add that Mr. Ohr maintains these records 
in perfect order and the task of preparing this re- 
port is made much easier by his excellent bookkeeping. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WILLIAM SEXTON, JR., Auditor 

EAST-WEST ALL STAR FOOTBALL AND 
BASKETBALL GAMES OF THE KENTUCKY 
HIGH SCHOOL COACHES ASSOCIATION STATE- 
MENT OF RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
FOR THE PERIOD MARCH 14, 1962 TO MARCH 
13, 1963. 

RECEIPTS: 

Balance in First Security Nat'l Bank & 

Trust Co., Lexington, Ky., on 

March 14, 1962 $17,874.64 

Receipts from 

All-star Games $12,835.00 

Program Receipts 600.00 

Reimbursement from Hartford 

Ins. Co. for medical expenses 

to players 73.00 13,508.00 

Total Receipts $31,382.64 

DISBURSEMENTS: 
Change for 

All-Star Games 600.00 

Printing 285.06 

Medical Expenses-Players 226.42 

Travel Expenses-Players — _ 815.32 

Manager Salary 500.00 

Manager Expenses 181.65 

AU-Star Awards 718.12 

Coaches Salaries 1,000.00 

Insurance 50.94 

Federal Taxes 297.40 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1963 



Kentucky Sales Tax 393.40 

Grant to Jerry Hager 100.00 

Total Disbursements 5.168.31 

BALANCE on March 13, 1963 $26.2103 

Balance on deposit in First Security 
Nat*l Bank & Trust Company, Lex- 
ington, Ky. per bank statement 
of March 13, 1963 $26,214.33 



Executive Committee Meeting 

Held in Louisville, April 17, 1963 

The Executive Committee of the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association met April 17, 1963, in Room 704 of the 
Kentucky Hotel in Louisville, Kentucky, with the following 
members present: Ralph Dorsey, Richard Green well. Bob 
Wright, Charles Kuhn, Joe Ohr, and Estill Branham. 

Two changes in the rulec and regulations governing the 
coaching and managing of the All-Star football and basketball 
gajnes were unanimously approved by the committee. These were: 

First — A coach or an assistant coach to be eligible fcr 
coaching duties must be employed by a Kentucky school dis- 
trict as a coach. A coach elected to an AH-Star coaching poui- 
tion, who accepts a job outside the State of Kentucky, or ac- 
cepts a coaching job in a college, or leaves the field of educa- 
tion, automatically forfeits his position as a coach in the All- 
Star games. 

Second — No head coach or assistant coach can use another 
coach as a student manager in the All-Star games. In future 
All-Star games the position of student manager shall be filled 
by a high school student. 

Annual Business Meeting 

Held in Louisville, April 17, 1963 

The regular business meeting of the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association was held in the South Room of the Brown 
Hotel in Louisville, The meeting waG delayed some twenty 
minutes because of a misunderstanding as to the site. 

President Richard Green well, (Shelbyville) called the meet- 
ing to order at 7 :50 P.M. Coach Gippy Graham (Georgetown) 
delivered the invocation. 

President Green well recognized guests in attendance. Com- 
missioner Theo. A. Sanford. Asu't. Commissioner J. B. Mans- 
field. Board of Control Members Ralph Dorsey and Ty Holland 
■were recognized, as were members of the press. 

As the minutes of the 1961-62 meeting were published in 
the ATHLETE, official publication of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association, it wau moved and seconded that 
the reading before the assembly be dispensed with. The motion 
carried. 

A financial report of the Kentucky High School Coaches 
Association and the All-Star account was read by Sec'y-Treas- 
Joe Ohr. It was moved and seconded that the readings be ac- 
cepted. Copies of the two accounts are to appear in the 
ATHLETE. 

There was a report by Sec'y Joe Ohr regarding an Execu- 
tive Meeting held in Lexington on April 10 at 7:00 P.M. at 
which time it was proposed that the Kentucky High School 
Coaches Association s€^k the cooperation of the Lexington 
Quarterback Club in promotion of the All-Star games held 
each year on the University of Kentucky campuii. It was moved 
by L. J. Charmoli (Manual) and seconded by Jim Boyd (An- 
derson County) that this proposal be approved. The motion 
passed. 

Coach Bob Wright (Ashland) presented to the 105 memberc 
present Mr. Ellis Johnson, newly appointed basketball coach 
at Marshall University. Johnson, one of the truly great ath- 
letes in Kentucky history, complimented the high school coaches 
in the wonderful growth in the past few years. 

Johnson remarked "I'm delighted to be back in coaching, 
becau»5e it gives me an opportunity to renew my acquaintance 
with the older coaches and an opportunity to meet some of the 
younger ones." Johnson issued a chaJlenge to all coaches when 
he said, "If you enjoy coaching, do your best with the oppor- 
tunity. There aren't any easy jobs. Coaching takes hard work." 
Johnson exprajsed his pleasure for being invited to speak be- 
fore the K.H.S.A.A. and welcomed Kentucky coaches to visit 
him at Marshall University. 

Every coach was invited to attend the first annual basket- 
ball clinic, to be held Thursday morning at the Hideaway Room 
in the Student Union Building on the University of Louisville 
campus. The clinic was to begin at 9:30 with the following out^ 
standing Kentucky High School coaches presenting the pro- 
gram: Robert Mulcahy (Seneca). Coach of the 1963 State 
Champions; John Lykins (Frankfort), coach of Frankfort, co- 
champions of the Central Kentucky Conference ; Jack Suther- 
land f Harrison County), coach of the champions of the Mid- 
States Conference; and Jim Bazzell (Allen County), coach of 



one of Sweet Sixteen. Bob Wright (Ashland), Chairman of the 
Committee for the clinic, emphasized to the coaches that plans 
are made to make this an annual affair. 

Coach Kuhn (Male), President of the LouiGvlile Football 
Coaches Association, informed the assembly concerning the 
football coaching clinic which was to be held Saturday, April 
20, at St. Xavier High School between the hours of 8:00 A.M. 
and 4 :30 P.M. Two out-of-state coaches were to be presented 
to the high school coaches, Tony Mason of Nilas, Ohio, and 
Bron Bacevich of Roger Bacon High School, Cincinnati. Ohio. 
Kentucky high school coaches appearing on the clinic includes 
Paul Miller (Flaget), John Meihaus (St. Xr.vier), Tom Harper 
(Manual), and Charles Kuhn (Male). 

President Richard Greenwell presented to Ralph Dorsey a 
plaque in recognition of his services ats outgoing Presdient of 
the Kentucky High School Coaches Association. Dorsey (Ca- 
verna) is now a member of the Board of Control of the Ken- 
tucky High School Athletic Association. 

Two of Kentucky's outstanding coaches were presented 
trophies, symbolic of the sports in which they won acclaim as 
the "Coach of the Year." Ray Callahan (Danville) was recog- 
nized as the Coach of the Year in football and was presented 
his trophy by Roy Kidd, recipient of the award in 1961. 

Morton Combs ( Carr Creek ) was selected by his fellow 
coaches as Coach of the Year — 1963, and received his award 
from Jim Bazzell (Allen County), winner in 1962. Combs in 
receiving his award •said, "I hope that I ca.n cast a vote for 
each of you as a winner of this award, because this is one of 
niy greatest honors, being elected by my fellow coaches." 

The two elective offices of the Kentucky High School Coach- 
es Association for 1964-65 were filled when Frazier (Anderson 
County) nominated and Ramuey ( Shepherds ville) seconded the 
nomination of Joe Ohr (Irvine) as Secretary-Treasurer. Ohr 
was elected by acclamation. 

Four nominees were placed before hte group for Sgt.-at- 
Arms. The four nominated were : Jim Bazzell, Allen County ; 
George Saurer, Shawnee ; Bob Mulcahy. Seneca ; and Gippy 
Graham, Georgetown. Bazzell was elected. 

It was proposed that in future voting for the two elective 
offices a ballot be prepared and given to the members for 
secret voting. Motion carried. 

It was also proposed that a ballot be prepared and sent to 
every coach who is a member of the K.H.S.C.A., and that they 
vote on the Secretary-Treasurer and the Sgt.-at-Arms. Wright 
(Louisa) submitted the proposal which lost for lack of a second. 

Ramsey (Shepherdsville) moved that a lifetime memberchip 
in the Kentucky High School Coacheu Association be issued to 
a coach who has devoted ten years or more to coaching, upon 
payment of S5.00. This membership was to be non-voting. The 
coach was to make application for such card. The motion 
carried. 

A membership report showed 1312 registered for 1962-63. 

K.H.S.C. A. officers are : President, Richard Greenwell ; 
Vice-President, Bob Wright ; Sgt.-at-Arms. Chariot Kuhn : 
Sec'y-Treas., Joe Ohr; Sgt.-at-Arms Elect, Jim Bazzell; All- 
Star Manager, Estill Granham ; Retiring President, Ralph 
Dorsey. 

The meeting adjourned at 9 :25. 

"Strike Three" 

Baseball is sponsoring a program to aid 
school athletic departments in maintaining 
the fine traditions and customs of baseball. 
This film is one of the features of the co- 
operative program. This instructional film 
is furnished by the American and National 
Leagues of Professional Baseball Clubs. It 
is a color sound film and runs about fifteen 
minutes. 

The film is designed for use in training 
pitchers. The greatest pitchers in the game 
today illustrate in slow motion how the ball 
is held and released for the fast ball, the 
slider, the screw ball and the knuckleball. 
The fielding duties of the pitcher are cover- 
ed in detail as well as the pick-off play and 
the major fundamentals of pitching. 

The illustrations are done by Warren 
Spahn, Bob Purkey, Dick Donovan, Whitey 
Ford, Frank Lary, Don Drysdale and others. 



It^s Later Than You Think! 

Have You Arranged For Your 

Student Accident And 

Athletic Coverages For 

1963-64? We Offer You 

First-Class Policies And 

Service. May We Explain 

Them To You? 



1U& Ki*Ufx!le4t Go4nfici4Uf, 



GENERAL AGENT 



W. E. KINGSLEY J. E. McCREARY, Mgr. CHARLES C. PRICE 

Life Department 

608 CENTRAL BANK BLDG. LEXINGTON, KY. PHONE 252-8522 



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